Catalogue


Watching the world : screen documentary and audiences /
Thomas Austin.
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2007.
description
217 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0719076897 (cloth), 0719076897 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester, UK ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2007.
isbn
0719076897 (cloth)
0719076897 (hbk.)
contents note
1. Continuity and change: the documentary 'boom' -- 2. Seeing, feeling, knowing: Etre et avoir -- 3. 'Suspense, fright, emotion, happy ending': documentary form and audience response to Touching the Void -- 4.'The most confusing tears': home video, sex crime and determinacy in Capturing the Friedmans -- 5. Approaching the invisible centre: middle-class identity and documentary film -- 6. 'Our planet reveals its secrets': wildlife documentaries on television -- 7. Conclusion: documentary world views.
catalogue key
6462116
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [205]-213) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-01-01:
Austin (Univ. of Sussex, UK) combines three methodological approaches to the documentary films he takes as case studies: close analysis of the texts themselves, contextual consideration of the commercial practices and marketing employed in these examples, and qualitative studies of viewer responses to individual films. If the first of these is common (though not pursued rigorously here), the latter two are less familiar in documentary study, particularly studies of viewer response, and they make this study interesting. In chapters devoted to Etre et avoir (2002), Touching the Void (2003), and Capturing the Friedmans (2003), Austin employs several measures of audience response, each described with some care. In a separate chapter on Paradise Lost (1996) and Paradise Lost 2 (2000), he substitutes an analytical assessment of his own reactions for the reactions of others, and his final study is a broad look at television nature documentaries. If his approach is unusual, his conclusions are less so; he argues that whatever documentary sets out to do, its social meaning is constructed "within the particular social situations of its individual viewers." But his methodology gives stronger support for that conclusion than a purely theorized argument could provide. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. K. S. Nolley Willamette University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2009
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Summaries
Main Description
Screen documentary has experienced a marked rise in popularity in recent years. What are the reasons for the so-called "boom" in documentaries at the cinema? How has television documentary met the challenge of new formats? And how do audiences engage with documentaries on screen? Watching the World extends the reach of documentary studies by investigating recent instances of screen documentary and the uses made of them by audiences. It focuses on the interfaces between textual mechanisms, promotional tactics, and audiences' viewing strategies. Key topics of inquiry are: film and tele-visual form, truth claims and issues of trust, the pleasures, politics and the ethics of documentary. This compelling and accessible book will be of interest to both students and fans of documentary.
Long Description
Screen documentary has experienced a marked rise in popularity in recent years. What are the reasons for the so-called "boom" in documentaries at the cinema? How has television documentary met the challenge of new formats? And how do audiences engage with documentaries on screen? "Watching the World" extends the reach of documentary studies by investigating recent instances of screen documentary and the uses made of them by audiences. It focuses on the interfaces between textual mechanisms, promotional tactics, and audiences' viewing strategies. Key topics of inquiry are: film and tele-visual form, truth claims and issues of trust, the pleasures, politics and the ethics of documentary. This compelling and accessible book will be of interest to both students and fans of documentary.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Screen documentary has experienced a marked rise in visibility and popularity in recent years. What are the reasons for the so-called 'boom' in documentaries at the cinema? This compelling and accessible book will be interest to both students and fans of documentary.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Introductionp. 1
Continuity and change: the documentary 'boom'p. 12
Seeing, feeling, knowing: Etre et avoirp. 34
'Suspense, fright, emotion, happy ending': documentary form and audience response to Touching the Voidp. 60
'The most confusing tears': home video, sex crime and indeterminacy in Capturing the Friedmansp. 84
Approaching the invisible centre: middle-class identity and documentary filmp. 109
'Our planet reveals its secrets': wildlife documentaries on televisionp. 122
Conclusion: documentary world viewsp. 178
Methodological appendixp. 184
Select bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 215
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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