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Exporting American dreams : Thurgood Marshall's African journey /
Mary L. Dudziak.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
description
xii, 257 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195329015 (cloth), 9780195329018 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.
isbn
0195329015 (cloth)
9780195329018 (cloth)
catalogue key
6456194
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-03-01:
Thurgood Marshall's reputation as an indefatigable civil rights leader and later as Supreme Court justice has been carefully chronicled by historians and legal authorities. What is new in this superb narrative is the detailed story of Marshall's role in Kenya as it emerged from British colony to full-fledged nationhood. Especially worthy of note is his authorship of the Kenyan bill of rights. Through careful juxtaposition, Dudziak (Univ. of Southern California Law School) leads the reader through Marshall's role as a civil rights activist in the US and as a strong participant in the political and constitutional development of the new Kenyan nation. In both cases, success did not come easily. Two close friends, Martin Luther King Jr. in the US and Tom Mboya in Nairobi, were assassinated during this period. In addition to the 272 pages of text, the author includes Marshall's notes of the draft of the proposed Kenyan bill of rights as well as detailed documentation of Marshall's work as a civil rights advocate. A worthy and readable tribute to a man dedicated to the advancement of civil rights in both the US and Africa. Summing Up: Recommended. All readership levels. R. J. Steamer emeritus, University of Massachusetts at Boston
Appeared in Library Journal on 2008-06-15:
In 1960, many post-independence African nations were on the cusp of political and social revolution. To help structure Kenya's society, the Kenyan government invited prominent civil rights attorney Thurgood Marshall to help develop a constitution and bill of rights. Dudziak (law & history, Univ. of Southern California Law Sch.) examines the multicultural implications for both Marshall and the Kenyan leaders as they ventured into uncharted territory. Marshall used his American legal consciousness to solve the problems of Kenyan society as it moved from colonial rule to democratic self-government. Dudziak recognizes the social and political disruptions to Kenya's path to democratic norms, including the recent violent crisis following the disputed 2007 presidential election, and contrasts Kenya's peaceful regime change in the early 1960s with contemporary U.S. racial conflicts in many urban areas. She also examines how the conception of democracy and rights varies among cultures. A central element for Marshall was how to develop ideas that would engage newly independent African political power and yet protect the rights of white minorities. In America, Marshall faced the same problem, but the racial proportions were reversed. This book on a less-studied part of Marshall's career is recommended for libraries collecting in law, legal processes, and African and African American history.--Steven Puro, St. Louis Univ. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2008-05-05:
While Marshall is best known for his pivotal role during Brown v. Board of Education and his appointment to the Supreme Court, Dudziak (Cold War Civil Rights) recovers a nearly buried undertaking, "one of the great adventures of his life": Marshall's contributions to the Kenyan Bill of Rights. Marshall arrived in London in January 1960; a month later, the Greensboro, N.C., sit-in began, and Marshall found himself "torn between two continents and two movements." The author effectively sketches those events in the civil rights movement (civil disobedience, urban riots, Black Power) and in Kenya (President Kenyatta's early moderation and subsequent mistreatment of the Asian minority and suppression of opposition) that supported and undermined Marshall's "faith in the law as a vehicle for social change." The tensions between Marshall's desire for equal rights and Kenyatta's priorities of "sovereignty and national unity" are still heartbreakingly unresolved, as are Marshall's great hope for the "entrenchment in Kenya of the rights he still hoped for in America." Dudziak's clarity and careful documentation make her book accessible to the general reader and a valuable tool for African and African-American studies. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Dudziak brings out with impressive clarity how Thurgood Marshall's greatness stemmed from his Whitman-esque ability to contain multitudes: committed to the rule of law, he could chide Kenya's new leadership for departing even slightly from it, work for justice in segregated America, and sustain a relationship with young civil rights activists taking direct and 'illegal' action in the early 1960s."--Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School and author of Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1956-1961 "In this gem of a book, Mary Dudziak brings vividly to life the important but little known history of Thurgood Marshall's intense involvement with Kenya during its journey toward independence in the 1960s. This great champion of the American civil rights struggle never relinquished his hope that democracy and equality would one day flourish in Kenya, even as he became painfully aware of the obstacles that stood in the path of this dream. A powerful and poignant story, beautifully told."--Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University and author of American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century "By dint of creative and exhaustive research, Mary Dudziak has written an excellent book about a facet of Thurgood Marshall's career that has never before received substantial attention. Who knew that 'Mr. Civil Rights' contributed significantly to African as well as American legal systems. All students of this great man's life owe a major debt to Professor Dudziak's labors."--Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School and author of Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal
"Effectively sketches those events in the civil rights movement... Dudziak's clarity and careful documentation make her book accessible to the general reader and a valuable tool for African and African-American studies."--Publishers Weekly "Dudziak brings out with impressive clarity how Thurgood Marshall's greatness stemmed from his Whitman-esque ability to contain multitudes: committed to the rule of law, he could chide Kenya's new leadership for departing even slightly from it, work for justice in segregated America, and sustain a relationship with young civil rights activists taking direct and 'illegal' action in the early 1960s."--Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School and author of Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1956-1961 "This book on a less-studied part of Marshall's career is recommended for libraries collecting in law, legal processes, and African and African American history."--Library Journal "In this gem of a book, Mary Dudziak brings vividly to life the important but little known history of Thurgood Marshall's intense involvement with Kenya during its journey toward independence in the 1960s. This great champion of the American civil rights struggle never relinquished his hope that democracy and equality would one day flourish in Kenya, even as he became painfully aware of the obstacles that stood in the path of this dream. A powerful and poignant story, beautifully told."--Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University and author of American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century "By dint of creative and exhaustive research, Mary Dudziak has written an excellent book about a facet of Thurgood Marshall's career that has never before received substantial attention. Who knew that 'Mr. Civil Rights' contributed significantly to African as well as American legal systems. All students of this great man's life owe a major debt to Professor Dudziak's labors."--Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School and author of Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal
"Readers who enjoy a thoughtful, accessible book that covers a seminal period in the histories of the two countries will appreciate the rich material this book provides."--Andrew Grant-Thomas,History: Reviews of New Books "Effectively sketches those events in the civil rights movement... Dudziak''s clarity and careful documentation make her book accessible to the general reader and a valuable tool for African and African-American studies."--Publishers Weekly "Dudziak brings out with impressive clarity how Thurgood Marshall''s greatness stemmed from his Whitman-esque ability to contain multitudes: committed to the rule of law, he could chide Kenya''s new leadership for departing even slightly from it, work for justice in segregated America, and sustain a relationship with young civil rights activists taking direct and ''illegal'' action in the early 1960s."--Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School and author ofMaking Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1956-1961 "This book on a less-studied part of Marshall''s career is recommended for libraries collecting in law, legal processes, and African and African American history."--Library Journal "Dudziak''s narrative proceeds by deftly interweaving the historical events of the 1960s in the United States and Kenya, with Marshall as the focal point and link.... The true genius [of the book] is in using Marshall as both a concrete and conceptual link between the civil rights protest movements of the early and late 1960s and the tactical and principled choices of US civil rights leaders or the leaders of the Kenyan independence movement.... Thought provoking and painstakingly researched."--Law & Politics Book Review "In this gem of a book, Mary Dudziak brings vividly to life the important but little known history of Thurgood Marshall''s intense involvement with Kenya during its journey toward independence in the 1960s. This great champion of the American civil rights struggle never relinquished his hope that democracy and equality would one day flourish in Kenya, even as he became painfully aware of the obstacles that stood in the path of this dream. A powerful and poignant story, beautifully told."--Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University and author ofAmerican Crucible: Race and Nation in the TwentiethCentury "By dint of creative and exhaustive research, Mary Dudziak has written an excellent book about a facet of Thurgood Marshall''s career that has never before received substantial attention. Who knew that ''Mr. Civil Rights'' contributed significantly to African as well as American legal systems. All students of this great man''s life owe a major debt to Professor Dudziak''s labors."--Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School and author ofSellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal "Dudziak brings out with impressive clarity how Thurgood Marshall''s greatness stemmed from his Whitman-esque ability to contain multitudes: committed to the rule of law, he could chide Kenya''s new leadership for departing even slightly from it, work for justice in segregated America, and sustain a relationship with young civil rights activists taking direct and ''illegal'' action in the early 1960s."--Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School and author ofMaking Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1956-1961 "In this gem of a book, Mary Dudziak brings vividly to life the important but little known history of Thurgood Marshall''s intense involvement with Kenya during its journey toward independence in the 1960s. This great champion of the American civil rights struggle never relinquished his hope that democracy and equality would one day flourish in Kenya, even as he became painfully aware of the obstacles that stood in the path of this dream. A powerful and poignant story, beautifully told."--Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University and author ofAmerican Crucible: Race and Nation in the TwentiethCentury "By dint of creative and exhaustive research, Mary Dudziak has written an excellent book about a facet of Thurgood Marshall''s career that has never before received substantial attention. Who knew that ''Mr. Civil Rights'' contributed significantly to African as well as American legal systems. All students of this great man''s life owe a major debt to Professor Dudziak''s labors."--Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School and author ofSellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal Mary L. Dudziak''sExporting American Dreamssuccessfully explores the relations between Thurgood Marshall and Africa through the prism of African American connections with Africa during the twentieth century... The book suggests the fleeting nature of democratic ideals in the mid-twentieth century, the exportation of which was easily spoiled when they became a fleeting illusion, rather than a feasible dream, in the lives of African Americans in the United States... a promising scholarship."--H-Net Reviews
"Readers who enjoy a thoughtful, accessible book that covers a seminal period in the histories of the two countries will appreciate the rich material this book provides."--Andrew Grant-Thomas, History: Reviews of New Books "Effectively sketches those events in the civil rights movement... Dudziak's clarity and careful documentation make her book accessible to the general reader and a valuable tool for African and African-American studies."-- Publishers Weekly "Dudziak brings out with impressive clarity how Thurgood Marshall's greatness stemmed from his Whitman-esque ability to contain multitudes: committed to the rule of law, he could chide Kenya's new leadership for departing even slightly from it, work for justice in segregated America, and sustain a relationship with young civil rights activists taking direct and 'illegal' action in the early 1960s."--Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School and author of Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1956-1961 "This book on a less-studied part of Marshall's career is recommended for libraries collecting in law, legal processes, and African and African American history."-- Library Journal "Dudziak's narrative proceeds by deftly interweaving the historical events of the 1960s in the United States and Kenya, with Marshall as the focal point and link.... The true genius [of the book] is in using Marshall as both a concrete and conceptual link between the civil rights protest movements of the early and late 1960s and the tactical and principled choices of US civil rights leaders or the leaders of the Kenyan independence movement.... Thought provoking and painstakingly researched."-- Law & Politics Book Review "In this gem of a book, Mary Dudziak brings vividly to life the important but little known history of Thurgood Marshall's intense involvement with Kenya during its journey toward independence in the 1960s. This great champion of the American civil rights struggle never relinquished his hope that democracy and equality would one day flourish in Kenya, even as he became painfully aware of the obstacles that stood in the path of this dream. A powerful and poignant story, beautifully told."--Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University and author of American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth Century "By dint of creative and exhaustive research, Mary Dudziak has written an excellent book about a facet of Thurgood Marshall's career that has never before received substantial attention. Who knew that 'Mr. Civil Rights' contributed significantly to African as well as American legal systems. All students of this great man's life owe a major debt to Professor Dudziak's labors."--Randall Kennedy, Harvard Law School and author of Sellout: The Politics of Racial Betrayal "Dudziak brings out with impressive clarity how Thurgood Marshall's greatness stemmed from his Whitman-esque ability to contain multitudes: committed to the rule of law, he could chide Kenya's new leadership for departing even slightly from it, work for justice in segregated America, and sustain a relationship with young civil rights activists taking direct and 'illegal' action in the early 1960s."--Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School and author of Making Civil Rights Law: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court, 1956-1961 "In this gem of a book, Mary Dudziak brings vividly to life the important but little known history of Thurgood Marshall's intense involvement with Kenya during its journey toward independence in the 1960s. This great champion of the American civil rights struggle never relinquished his hope that democracy and equality would one day flourish in Kenya, even as he became painfully aware of the obstacles that stood in the path of this dream. A powerful and poignant story, beautifully told."--Gary Gerstle, Vanderbilt University and author of American Crucible: Race and Nation in the Twentieth
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, May 2008
Library Journal, June 2008
Booklist, July 2008
Choice, March 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Thurgood Marshall became a living icon of civil rights when he argued Brown v. Board of Education before the Supreme Court in 1954. This text presents an intimate and dramatic portrait of one of the most important figures in American history.
Main Description
Thurgood Marshall became a living icon of civil rights when he argued Brown v. Board of Education before the Supreme Court in 1954. Six years later, he was at a crossroads. A rising generation of activists were making sit-ins and demonstrations rather than lawsuits and legal maneuvering thehallmarks of the civil rights movement. What role, he wondered, could he now play? When in 1960 Kenyan independence leaders asked him to help write their constitution, Marshall seized the occasion and threw himself into their cause. Here was a new arena in which law might serve as the tool withwhich to forge a just society, an opportunity to prove that legal means offered the brightest hope for progress. In Exporting American Dreams, Mary Dudziak recounts with poignancy and power the untold story of Marshall's journey to Africa. His experience in Kenya was emotional as well as intellectual, and during it he developed ties of friendship with, among others, Tom Mboya and Jomo Kenyatta. Marshallserved as advisor to the Kenyans, who needed to demonstrate to both Great Britain and to the world that they would treat minority races (whites and Asians) fairly once Africans took power. He crafted a bill of rights, aiding constitutional negotiations that enabled peaceful regime change, ratherthan violent resistance. Marshall's involvement with Kenya's foundation affirmed his belief in progress by legal means, while also forcing him to understand how the struggle for justice could be compromised by the imperatives of sovereignty. Marshall's beliefs were most sorely tested later in the decade when he became aSupreme Court Justice, even as American cities erupted in flames and civil rights progress stalled. But his journey to Africa remained a source of inspiration on which he continued to draw.
Main Description
Thurgood Marshall became a living icon of civil rights when he argued Brown v. Board of Education before the Supreme Court in 1954. Six years later, he was at a crossroads. A rising generation of activists were making sit-ins and demonstrations rather than lawsuits the hallmark of the civil rights movement. What role, he wondered, could he now play? When in 1960 Kenyan independence leaders asked him to help write their constitution, Marshall threw himself into their cause. Here was a new arena in which law might serve as the tool with which to forge a just society. In Exporting American Dreams , Mary Dudziak recounts with poignancy and power the untold story of Marshall's journey to Africa. African Americans were enslaved when the U.S. constitution was written. In Kenya, Marshall could become something that had not existed in his own country: a black man helping to found a nation. He became friends with Kenyan leaders Tom Mboya and Jomo Kenyatta, serving as advisor to the Kenyans, who needed to demonstrate to Great Britain and to the world that they would treat minority races (whites and Asians) fairly once Africans took power. He crafted a bill of rights, aiding constitutional negotiations that helped enable peaceful regime change, rather than violent resistance. Marshall's involvement with Kenya's foundation affirmed his faith in law, while also forcing him to understand how the struggle for justice could be compromised by the imperatives of sovereignty. Marshall's beliefs were most sorely tested later in the decade when he became a Supreme Court Justice, even as American cities erupted in flames and civil rights progress stalled. Kenya's first attempt at democracy faltered, but Marshall's African journey remained a cherished memory of a time and a place when all things seemed possible.
Main Description
Thurgood Marshall became a living icon of civil rights when he arguedBrown v. Board of Educationbefore the Supreme Court in 1954. Six years later, he was at a crossroads. A rising generation of activists were making sit-ins and demonstrations rather than lawsuits the hallmark of the civil rights movement. What role, he wondered, could he now play? When in 1960 Kenyan independence leaders asked him to help write their constitution, Marshall threw himself into their cause. Here was a new arena in which law might serve as the tool with which to forge a just society. InExporting American Dreams, Mary Dudziak recounts with poignancy and power the untold story of Marshall's journey to Africa. African Americans were enslaved when the U.S. constitution was written. In Kenya, Marshall could become something that had not existed in his own country: a black man helping to found a nation. He became friends with Kenyan leaders Tom Mboya and Jomo Kenyatta, serving as advisor to the Kenyans, who needed to demonstrate to Great Britain and to the world that they would treat minority races (whites and Asians) fairly once Africans took power. He crafted a bill of rights, aiding constitutional negotiations that helped enable peaceful regime change, rather than violent resistance. Marshall's involvement with Kenya's foundation affirmed his faith in law, while also forcing him to understand how the struggle for justice could be compromised by the imperatives of sovereignty. Marshall's beliefs were most sorely tested later in the decade when he became a Supreme Court Justice, even as American cities erupted in flames and civil rights progress stalled. Kenya's first attempt at democracy faltered, but Marshall's African journey remained a cherished memory of a time and a place when all things seemed possible.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Marshall and Mboya
Tricky Constitution
Writing Rights
Discriminating Friends
Anarchy is Anarchy
Epilogue
Appendix: Thurgood Marshall's Draft Bill of Rights for Kenya, 1960
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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