Catalogue


Chronology of immigration in the United States /
Russell O. Wright.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
description
ix, 202 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786436271 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786436279 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
isbn
0786436271 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786436279 (softcover : alk. paper)
abstract
"This book details the issues and events of the immigration debate from 1600 to present. It demonstrates how immigration laws changed to restrict immigration from 1917 through 1924, and shows how, in 1965, they were drastically changed to encourage it"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
6454910
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 189-191) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2008
Booklist, December 2008
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Summaries
Main Description
The United States is truly a nation of immigrants. While it was very sparsely populated by mostly Native Americans in 1600, today it is a nation of about 300 million people, most of whom are immigrants or descendents of immigrants. Before the landmark Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 (which abolished national-origin quotas), about 40 million immigrants had come to America, most of them from Europe. Since 1965, another 40 million immigrants have arrived, primarily from Mexico and Asia.This book details the issues and events of immigration to America chronologically from 1600 to the present, beginning with the mass influx of Jamestown settlers, Pilgrim separatists, and slaves during the colonial period and concluding with a discussion of the ongoing contemporary legislative debates over illegal immigration and border security. Other topics include the development of the first immigration-regulating laws in the Alien and Sedition Acts of the late 1790s; the mass influx of cheap immigrant labor during the industrial revolution; the intended severity of the 1917, 1921, and 1924 immigration laws; and the effects of the September 11, 2001 attacks, the Patriot Act of 2001, and the Homeland Security Act of 2002 on reshaping the public's opinion toward national security and immigration, particularly illegal immigration.
Title Summary
"Today the United States is a nation of about 300 million people, most of whom are immigrants or descendants of immigrants. Before the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, about 40 million immigrants had come to America, most of them from Europe. Since 1965, another 40 million have arrived, primarily from Mexico and Asia." "This book details the issues and events of immigration to America chronologically from 1600 to present, from the colonial period to contemporary legislative debates over illegal immigration and border security. Other topics include the first immigration-regulating laws of the 1790s; the influx of cheap labor during the industrial revolution; the severe 1917, 1921, and 1924 immigration laws; and the effects of the September 11, 2001 attacks, the Patriot Act of 2001, and the Homeland Security Act of 2002 on public opinion toward national security and immigration."--BOOK JACKET.
Main Description
The United States is truly a nation of immigrants. While it was very sparsely populated by mostly Native Americans in 1600, today it is a nation of about 300 million people, most of whom are immigrants or descendents of immigrants. Before the landmark Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 (which abolished national-origin quotas), about 40 million immigrants had come to America, most of them from Europe. Since 1965, another 40 million immigrants have arrived, primarily from Mexico and Asia. This book details the issues and events of immigration to America chronologically from 1600 to the present, beginning with the mass influx of Jamestown settlers, Pilgrim separatists, and slaves during the colonial period and concluding with a discussion of the ongoing contemporary legislative debates over illegal immigration and border security. Other topics include the development of the first immigration-regulating laws in the Alien and Sedition Acts of the late 1790s; the mass influx of cheap immigrant labor during the industrial revolution; the intended severity of the 1917, 1921, and 1924 immigration laws; and the effects of the September 11, 2001 attacks, the Patriot Act of 2001, and the Homeland Security Act of 2002 on reshaping the public's opinion toward national security and immigration, particularly illegal immigration.
Description for Library
"This book details the issues and events of the immigration debate from 1600 to present. It demonstrates how immigration laws changed to restrict immigration from 1917 through 1924, and shows how, in 1965, they were drastically changed to encourage it"--Provided by publisher.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
The Chronologyp. 25
Immigration by Decadep. 165
Immigration by Period and Sourcep. 169
Key Legislation Affecting Immigrationp. 174
The Bracero Programp. 179
Immigration and Populationp. 182
Eugenics and the 1924 Immigration Actp. 185
Bibliographyp. 189
Indexp. 193
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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