Catalogue


Strategies of writing : studies on text and trust in the Middle Ages ; papers from "Trust in Writing in the Middle Ages" (Utrecht 28-29 November 2002) /
edited by Petra Schulte, Marco Mostert and Irene van Renswoude.
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, c2008.
description
xiii, 413 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
2503517587, 9782503517582
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, c2008.
isbn
2503517587
9782503517582
general note
Selected conference papers.
language note
Two chapters in German.
catalogue key
6445155
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The contributions to this volume address the complex relationships between 'trust' and 'writing' in the Middle Ages. They deal with charters, historiography, letters, political communication, and the possibilities of trust in writing.
Long Description
Trust is the basis of all social relations. A society in which trust - be it in one's fellow men or in political order - is not assured, will not, in the end, endure. In the Middle Ages - as, indeed, in any other period in human history - trust presupposes the concordance between word and deed, for instance, that future human action may be predicted. In this way trust creates the security necessary in the life of individuals. Rather than an emotion, trust is an attitude based on experience. It is not created spontaneously, but requires a process of observation and socialization. This implies that the preconditions for trust are culturally determined and subject to change. Trust is expressed through communication. The following questions are addressed in the contributions to this volume: Are some contents more trustworthy than others? Does writing as a medium engender trust irrespective of the contents of the written text? Was trust in writing dependent on trust in an authority? Was it perhaps exclusively dependent on that authority? Are there suggestions that the written form of the text was meant to confer trust on its contents? Did rituals take place (before or during the writing down of the text, or during its handing over to its recipient) that were meant to enhance the text's trustworthiness? Can changes be observed in the strategies of engendering trust? Was trust food for reflection in written texts? What was considered to constitute a breach of trust?
Long Description
Trust is the basis of all social relations. A society in which trust is not assured, will not, in the end, endure. Trust presupposes the concordance of word and deed. Rather than an emotion, trust is an attitude based on experience. It is not created spontaneously, but requires a process of observation and socialization. This implies that the preconditions for trust are culturally determined and subject to change. Trust is expressed through communication. Writing may engender trust, and trust may be placed in written texts. The contributions to this volume address the complex relationships between 'trust' and 'writing' in the Middle Ages. They deal with charters, historiography, letters, political communication, and the possibilities of trust in writing. Some of the questions addressed are: Does writing as a medium engender trust irrespective of the contents of the written text? Was trust in writing dependent on trust in an authority? Are there suggestions that the written form of the text was meant to confer trust on its contents? Did rituals take place (before or during the writing of the text, or during its handing over to the recipient) that were meant to enhance the text's trustworthiness? Can changes be observed in the strategies of engendering trust? Was trust considered food for reflection in written texts? What was considered to constitute a breach of trust? The volume is dedicated to Michael Clanchy, whose work inspired much of its contents.
Table of Contents
Fides publico: Die Dekonstruktion eines Forschungsbegriffesp. 15
Forgery and Trustp. 37
From Subscription to Seal: The Growing Importance of Seals as Signs of Authenticity in Early Medieval Royal Chartersp. 63
30 June 1047: The End of Charters as Legal Evidence in France?p. 85
Illustration and Persuasion in Southern Italian Cartularies (c. 1100)p. 95
Trust in Writing: Charters in the Twelfth-Century County of Hollandp. 111
Mechanisms of Authentication in Late Medieval North German Chroniclesp. 135
Trust and Visualization: Illustrated Chronicles in the Late Middle Ages: The Swiss Illustrated Chronicle by Diebold Schilling from Luzern, 1513p. 165
Litterae, cartae, codices, petentes und notarii: Aspekte der Vertrauenswurdigkeit von Papsturkunden im Pontifikat Innozenz' III (1198-1216)p. 185
Trust and Mistrust in Letters: Late Medieval Diplomacy and Its Communi- cation Practicesp. 213
Suitable for Crown and Gown: The Ritual Context of the Royal Privileges for the University of Parisp. 239
Peace Treaties in Italian City Communes: Public Interaction and Written Recordp. 253
Waging War and Making Peace with Written Documents: The Kingdom of Poland against the Teutonic Knights (1411-1422)p. 263
Point of Reference: Trust and the Function of Written Agreements in a Late Medieval Townp. 277
Rebels, Texts and Triumph: The Use of Written Documents during the Revolt of 1477 in Brugesp. 301
The Vikings' Trust in the Written Wordp. 325
Trusting Writing in Medieval Scandinaviap. 337
Ways of Knowing and Meanings of Literacy in Twelfth-Century Admontp. 355
Trust: Some Methodological Reflectionsp. 379
"The Word Once Sent Forth Can Never Come Back": Trust in Writing and the Dangers of Publicationp. 393
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem