Catalogue


(Re)visualizing national history : museums and national identities in Europe in the new millennium /
edited by Robin Ostow.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2008.
description
x, 228 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802092217 (alk. pap.), 9780802092212 (alk. pap.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2008.
isbn
0802092217 (alk. pap.)
9780802092212 (alk. pap.)
contents note
Exhibition as film / Mieke Bal -- The terror of the house / István Rév -- Putting contested history on display : the uses of the past in Northern Ireland / Elizabeth Crooke -- Museums, multiculturalism, and the remaking of postwar Sarajevo / Edin Hajradpašić -- Building a Jewish museum in Germany in the twenty-first century / Bernhard Purin -- Remusealizing Jewish history in Warsaw : the privatization and externalization of nation building / Robin Ostow -- Constructing the Canadian War Museum/constructing the landscape of Canadian identity / Reesa Greenberg -- Peter Eisenman's design for Berlin's memorial for the murdered Jews of Europe : a juror's report in three parts / James E. Young.
catalogue key
6438937
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-12-01:
This publication is the outgrowth of a 2004 conference sponsored by the University of Toronto. Its thesis is based on the belief that the role of a contemporary museum is increasingly contentious as post-Cold War Europe struggles with issues of its visual histories versus its various national identities. As museums grow at an unprecedented rate, they face unique challenges in coping with nationalism, globalization, and multiculturalism. (Re)visualizing National History takes a multidisciplinary approach, representing a wide range of European perspectives in a case study-like format. Divided into four parts, the book looks at issues of exhibition philosophy, the reconfiguration of national histories, international participation in museum development, and the display of national involvement with war and genocide. Edited by Ostow (Univ. of Toronto), the book features essays by eight distinguished museum professionals from a variety of countries and backgrounds. The essays are uniformly well written, readable, informative, and authoritative, and provide pertinent bibliographies and useful notes. Technically the book is of good quality--small in format, straightforward in design, and offering 29 adequate but informative figures. This work makes an important contribution to literature dealing with the missions and challenges facing contemporary museums in a postmodern world. Summing Up: Recommended All libraries supporting museum studies; graduate students and up. J. A. Day University of South Dakota
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2008
Choice, December 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
The role of the museum is a contentious one. The last fifteen years have seen scholars point to ways in which states A? particularly imperial states A? use museums as sites to showcase looted treasure, to document their geographic expansion, to present the state as the guardian of the national treasure, and to educate citizens and subjects. This period has also seen a great deal of attention paid to the reshaping of national histories and values in the wake of the collapse of the Communist bloc and the emergence of the European Union. (Re)Visualizing National Historybrings these two streams of scholarship together, treating the wave of monument and museum building in Europe as part of an attempt to forge consensus in politically unified, but deeply divided nations. The essays in this collection explore the ways in which museums exhibit new national values, and, equally important, how the realization of these new museums (and new exhibits in older museums) reflects the search for a new consensus among different generational groups in Europe and in North America. The approach of the volume is deliberately interdisciplinary. The contributors come from a variety of countries in Europe and North America, speaking from the perspectives of cultural studies, history, art history, anthropology, and sociology, as well as museum studies.
Main Description
Ideas regarding the role of the museum have become increasingly contentious. In the last fifteen years, scholars have pointed to ways in which states (especially imperialist states) use museums to showcase looted artefacts, to document their geographic expansion, to present themselves as the guardians of national treasure, and to educate citizens and subjects. At the same time, a great deal of attention has been paid to reshaping national histories and values in the wake of the collapse of the Communist bloc and the emergence of the European Union. (Re)Visualizing National Historyconsiders the wave of monument and museum building in Europe as part of an attempt to forge consensus in politically unified but deeply divided nations. This collection explores ways in which museums exhibit emerging national values and how the establishment of these new museums (and new exhibits in older museums) reflects the search for a consensus among different generational groups in Europe and North America. The contributors come from a variety of countries and academic backgrounds, and speak from such varied perspectives as cultural studies, history, anthropology, sociology, and museum studies. (Re)Visualizing National Historyis a unique and interdisciplinary volume that offers insights on the dilemmas of present-day European culture, manifestations of nationalism in Europe, and the debates surrounding museums as sites for the representation of politics and history.
Main Description
The role of the museum is a contentious one. The last fifteen years have seen scholars point to ways in which states - particularly imperial states - use museums as sites to showcase looted treasure, to document their geographic expansion, to present the state as the guardian of the national treasure, and to educate citizens and subjects. This period has also seen a great deal of attention paid to the reshaping of national histories and values in the wake of the collapse of the Communist bloc and the emergence of the European Union. (Re)Visualizing National History brings these two streams of scholarship together, treating the wave of monument and museum building in Europe as part of an attempt to forge consensus in politically unified, but deeply divided nations.The essays in this collection explore the ways in which museums exhibit new national values, and, equally important, how the realization of these new museums (and new exhibits in older museums) reflects the search for a new consensus among different generational groups in Europe and in North America. The approach of the volume is deliberately interdisciplinary. The contributors come from a variety of countries in Europe and North America, speaking from the perspectives of cultural studies, history, art history, anthropology, and sociology, as well as museum studies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Museums and National Identities in Europe in the Twenty-First Centuryp. 3
The Twenty-First Century: New Exhibits and New Partnerships
Exhibition as Filmp. 15
Reconfiguring National History: Centralized and Local Strategies
The Terror of the Housep. 47
Putting Contested History on Display: The Uses of the Past in Northern Irelandp. 90
Restoring National History with International Participation
Museums, Multiculturalism, and the Remaking of Postwar Sarajevop. 109
Building a Jewish Museum in Germany in the Twenty-First Centuryp. 139
Remusealizing Jewish History in Warsaw: The Privatization and Externalization of Nation Buildingp. 157
Displaying War, Genocide, and the Nation: From Ottawa to Berlin, 2005
Constructing the Canadian War Museum/Constructing the Landscape of a Canadian Identityp. 183
Peter Eisenman's Design for Berlin's Memorial for the Murdered Jews of Europe: A Juror's Report in Three Partsp. 200
Contributorsp. 215
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem