Catalogue


Innovation in global industries : U.S. firms competing in a new world : collected studies /
Jeffrey T. Macher and David C. Mowery, editors ; Committee on the Competitiveness and Workforce Needs of U.S. Industry, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, Naitonal Research Council of the National Academies.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2008.
description
xiii, 371 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0309116317, 9780309116312
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academies Press, c2008.
isbn
0309116317
9780309116312
contents note
Personal computing / Jason Dedrick and Kenneth L. Kraemer -- Software / Ashish Arora, Chris Forman, and JiWoong Yoon -- Semiconductors / Jeffrey T. Macher, David C. Mowery, and Alberto Di Minin -- Flat Panel Displays / Jeffrey A. Hart -- Lighting / Susan W. Sanderson, Kenneth L. Simons, Judith L. Walls, and Yin-yi Lai -- Pharmaceuticals / Iain M. Cockburn -- Biotechnology / Raine Hermans, Alicia Löffler, and Scott Stern -- Logistics / Anuradha Nagarajan and Chelsea C. White III -- Venture Capital / Martin Kenney, Martin Haemmig, and W. Richard Goe -- Financial Services / Ravi Aron.
general note
Papers resulting from two workshops held April 19, 2006 and April 20, 2007 in Washington, D.C.
catalogue key
6431929
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-01-01:
This work, sponsored by the National Research Council, studies the impact of the accelerating globalization of innovation on US businesses and workers. The excellent industry studies in this volume include software, personal computing, semiconductors, flat panel displays, lighting, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, logistics, venture capital, and financial services. By revealing the changing nature of innovation processes in each industry, these studies offer some solace to those concerned that US firms and workers are losing their competitive advantage, notwithstanding the emergence of new locations of research capacity, new sources of skilled technical workers, and global sourcing of innovation. The authors of each industry study offer policy recommendations designed to enhance the ability of US firms and workers to innovate. Editors Macher (George Washington Univ.) and Mowery (Univ. of California, Berkeley) emphasize the importance of continued support for policies such as ARPANET and broadband development, which provided a large domestic "testbed" for end users of new applications. They also warn against "short-sighted" university patenting and licensing policies, policies that restrict federal funding of politically sensitive topics such as embryonic stem cell research and, citing the positive-sum nature of global competition in innovation, policies that would restrict international trade and investment flows. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections. R. C. Singleton University of Puget Sound
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2009
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The debate over offshoring of production, transfer of technological capabilities, and potential loss of U.S. competitiveness is a long-running one. Prevailing thinking is that "the world is flat"-that is, innovative capacity is spreading uniformly; as new centers of manufacturing emerge, research and development and new product development follow. Innovation in Global Industries challenges this thinking. The book, a collection of individually authored studies, examines in detail structural changes in the innovation process in 10 service as well as manufacturing industries: personal computers; semiconductors; flat-panel displays; software; lighting; biotechnology; pharmaceuticals; financial services; logistics; and venture capital. There is no doubt that overall there has been an acceleration in global sourcing of innovation and an emergence of new locations of research capacity and advanced technical skills, but the patterns are highly variable. Many industries and some firms in nearly all industries retain leading-edge capacity in the United States. However, the book concludes that is no reason for complacency about the future outlook. Innovation deserves more emphasis in firm performance measures and more sustained support in public policy. Innovation in Global Industries will be of special interest to business people and government policy makers as well as professors, students, and other researchers of economics, management, international affairs, and political science.
Description for Bookstore
The debate over offshoring of production, transfer of technological capabilities, and potential loss of U.S. competitiveness is a long-running one. Prevailing thinking is that "the world is flat"-that is, innovative capacity is spreading uniformly; as new centers of manufacturing emerge, research and development and new product development follow. Innovation in Global Industrieschallenges this thinking. The book, a collection of individually authored studies, examines in detail structural changes in the innovation process in 10 service as well as manufacturing industries: personal computers; semiconductors; flat-panel displays; software; lighting; biotechnology; pharmaceuticals; financial services; logistics; and venture capital. There is no doubt that overall there has been an acceleration in global sourcing of innovation and an emergence of new locations of research capacity and advanced technical skills, but the patterns are highly variable. Many industries and some firms in nearly all industries retain leading-edge capacity in the United States. However, the book concludes that is no reason for complacency about the future outlook. Innovation deserves more emphasis in firm performance measures and more sustained support in public policy. Innovation in Global Industrieswill be of special interest to business people and government policy makers as well as professors, students, and other researchers of economics, management, international affairs, and political science.
Description for Bookstore
The debate over offshoring of production, transfer of technological capabilities, and potential loss of U.S. competitiveness is a long-running one. Prevailing thinking is that “the world is flat”-that is, innovative capacity is spreading uniformly; as new centers of manufacturing emerge, research and development and new product development follow. Innovation in Global Industries challenges this thinking. The book, a collection of individually authored studies, examines in detail structural changes in the innovation process in 10 service as well as manufacturing industries: personal computers; semiconductors; flat-panel displays; software; lighting; biotechnology; pharmaceuticals; financial services; logistics; and venture capital. There is no doubt that overall there has been an acceleration in global sourcing of innovation and an emergence of new locations of research capacity and advanced technical skills, but the patterns are highly variable. Many industries and some firms in nearly all industries retain leading-edge capacity in the United States. However, the book concludes that is no reason for complacency about the future outlook. Innovation deserves more emphasis in firm performance measures and more sustained support in public policy. Innovation in Global Industries will be of special interest to business people and government policy makers as well as professors, students, and other researchers of economics, management, international affairs, and political science.
Long Description
The debate over offshoring of production, transfer of technological capabilities, and potential loss of U.S. competitiveness is a long-running one. Prevailing thinking is that "the world is flat"--that is, innovative capacity is spreading uniformly; as new centers of manufacturing emerge, research and development and new product development follow. Innovation in Global Industries challenges this thinking. The book, a collection of individually authored studies, examines in detail structural changes in the innovation process in 10 service as well as manufacturing industries: personal computers; semiconductors; flat-panel displays; software; lighting; biotechnology; pharmaceuticals; financial services; logistics; and venture capital. There is no doubt that overall there has been an acceleration in global sourcing of innovation and an emergence of new locations of research capacity and advanced technical skills, but the patterns are highly variable. Many industries and some firms in nearly all industries retain leading-edge capacity in the United States. However, the book concludes that is no reason for complacency about the future outlook. Innovation deserves more emphasis in firm performance measures and more sustained support in public policy. Innovation in Global Industries will be of special interest to business people and government policy makers as well as professors, students, and other researchers of economics, management, international affairs, and political science.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Personal Computingp. 19
Softwarep. 53
Semiconductorsp. 101
Flat Panel Displaysp. 141
Lightingp. 163
Pharmaceuticalsp. 207
Biotechnologyp. 231
Logisticsp. 273
Venture Capitalp. 313
Financial Servicesp. 341
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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