Catalogue


Turning learning right side up : putting education back on track /
Russell L. Ackoff, Daniel Greenberg.
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Wharton School Pub., c2008.
description
xix, 196 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0132346494 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780132346498 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Wharton School Pub., c2008.
isbn
0132346494 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780132346498 (hardback : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6427885
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
PrefacePreface: Why, and How, This Book Was WrittenWhen we first met at a conference devoted to learning in the twenty-first century, we were delighted to find ourselves deeply in sympathy with each other's approach to education. We had each spent long years with people of all ages and in a variety of different environmentsschools, universities, businesses (large and small), nonprofit organizationsespousing views that were for the most part considered radical and unrealistic. We had each endeavored to turn our dreams into reality, and we had each enjoyed enough support and success to encourage us to carry on.But we had never crossed paths, either directly or indirectly. We soon discovered our common interests, our shared goals, and the widely divergent paths that our lives had taken. We soon became friends.One day, we began to discuss a certain subject of mutual interest. Because we lived too far apart to meet regularly face to face, we resorted to writing each other. Because of the ease of e-mail, our exchange became, from the outset, a conversation, a rapid exchange of ideas, albeit in written rather than oral form.The more we chatted through e-mail, the more we delved into the aspects of education that had engrossed us throughout our lives.Eventually, this book emergeda book we believe could be of interest to others who have struggled with the same problems.We wanted, in the body of this book, to keep our unique voices and approaches distinct and obvious to the reader. What you will see is the actual conversation we had, rather than an amalgamation and homogenization of two separate worldviews. In each chapter, our separate views have been set off by icons to enable readers to distinguish our "voices." However, in the final section of the book, which is about our vision of ideal education, we found that we could speak with one voice, undifferentiated.We have derived immense pleasure out of our collaboration in this venture. We hope you, the reader, will enjoy eavesdropping on our conversation.
Introduction or Preface
Preface Preface: Why, and How, This Book Was Written When we first met at a conference devoted to learning in the twenty-first century, we were delighted to find ourselves deeply in sympathy with each other's approach to education. We had each spent long years with people of all ages and in a variety of different environmentsschools, universities, businesses (large and small), nonprofit organizationsespousing views that were for the most part considered radical and unrealistic. We had each endeavored to turn our dreams into reality, and we had each enjoyed enough support and success to encourage us to carry on. But we had never crossed paths, either directly or indirectly. We soon discovered our common interests, our shared goals, and the widely divergent paths that our lives had taken. We soon became friends. One day, we began to discuss a certain subject of mutual interest. Because we lived too far apart to meet regularly face to face, we resorted to writing each other. Because of the ease of e-mail, our exchange became, from the outset, a conversation, a rapid exchange of ideas, albeit in written rather than oral form. The more we chatted through e-mail, the more we delved into the aspects of education that had engrossed us throughout our lives. Eventually, this book emergeda book we believe could be of interest to others who have struggled with the same problems. We wanted, in the body of this book, to keep our unique voices and approaches distinct and obvious to the reader. What you will see is the actual conversation we had, rather than an amalgamation and homogenization of two separate worldviews. In each chapter, our separate views have been set off by icons to enable readers to distinguish our "voices." However, in the final section of the book, which is about our vision of ideal education, we found that we could speak with one voice, undifferentiated. We have derived immense pleasure out of our collaboration in this venture. We hope you, the reader, will enjoy eavesdropping on our conversation.
First Chapter

Preface: Why, and How, This Book Was Written

When we first met at a conference devoted to learning in the twenty-first century, we were delighted to find ourselves deeply in sympathy with each other’s approach to education. We had each spent long years with people of all ages and in a variety of different environments—schools, universities, businesses (large and small), nonprofit organizations—espousing views that were for the most part considered radical and unrealistic. We had each endeavored to turn our dreams into reality, and we had each enjoyed enough support and success to encourage us to carry on.

But we had never crossed paths, either directly or indirectly. We soon discovered our common interests, our shared goals, and the widely divergent paths that our lives had taken. We soon became friends.

One day, we began to discuss a certain subject of mutual interest. Because we lived too far apart to meet regularly face to face, we resorted to writing each other. Because of the ease of e-mail, our exchange became, from the outset, a conversation, a rapid exchange of ideas, albeit in written rather than oral form.

The more we chatted through e-mail, the more we delved into the aspects of education that had engrossed us throughout our lives.

Eventually, this book emerged—a book we believe could be of interest to others who have struggled with the same problems.

We wanted, in the body of this book, to keep our unique voices and approaches distinct and obvious to the reader. What you will see is the actual conversation we had, rather than an amalgamation and homogenization of two separate worldviews. In each chapter, our separate views have been set off by icons to enable readers to distinguish our “voices.” However, in the final section of the book, which is about our vision of ideal education, we found that we could speak with one voice, undifferentiated.

We have derived immense pleasure out of our collaboration in this venture. We hope you, the reader, will enjoy eavesdropping on our conversation.

Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the age of the Internet, we educate people much as we did during the industrial revolution, preparing them for a world that no longer exists. This book offers a new way forward, asking questions about the nature and purpose of education in the 21st century.
Back Cover Copy
In the age of the Internet, we educate people much as we did during the Industrial Revolution. We educate them for a world that no longer exists, instilling values antithetical to those of a free, 21st century democracy. Worst of all, too many schools extinguish the very creativity and joy they ought to nourish. InTurning Learning Right Side Up, legendary systems scientist Dr. Russell Ackoff and "in-the-trenches" education innovator Daniel Greenberg offer a radically new path forward. In the year's most provocative conversation, they take on the very deepest questions about education: What should be its true purpose? Do classrooms make sense anymore? What should individuals contribute to their own education? Are yesterday's distinctions between subjects--and between the arts and sciences--still meaningful? What would the ideal lifelong education look like--at K-12, in universities, in the workplace, and beyond? Ackoff and Greenberg each have experience making radical change work--successfully. Here, they combine deep idealism with a relentless focus on the real world--and arrive at solutions that are profoundly sensible and powerfully compelling. Why today's educational system fails--and whysuperficial reforms won't help The questions politicians won't ask--and the answers they don't want to hear How do people learn--and why do they choose to learn? Creating schools that reflect what we know about learning In a 21st century democracy, what values must we nurture? ...and why aren't we nurturing them? How can tomorrow's "ideal schools" be operatedand funded? A plan that cuts through political gridlock and canactually work Beyond schools: building a society of passionatelifelong learners Learning from childhood to college to workplacethrough retirement Reinventing Learningfor the Next Century:How We Can,and Why We Must An extraordinary conversation about the very deepest questions... Today, what is education for? Where should it take place? How? When? What is the ideal school? The ideal lifelong learning experience? Who should be in charge of education? And who pays for it all? Over the past 150 years, virtually everything has changed...except education. Schools were designed as factories, to train factory workers. The factories are gone, but the schools haven't changed. It's time for us to return to first principles...or formulate new first principles...and reimagine education from the ground up. InTurning Learning Right Side Up, two of this generation's most provocative thinkers--and practical
Main Description
In the age of the Internet, we educate people much as we did during the Industrial Revolution. We educate them for a world that no longer exists, instilling values antithetical to those of a free, 21st century democracy. Worst of all, too many schools extinguish the very creativity and joy they ought to nourish. In Turning Learning Right Side Up, legendary systems scientist Dr. Russell Ackoff and “in-the-trenches” education innovator Daniel Greenberg offer a radically new path forward. In the year’s most provocative conversation, they take on the very deepest questions about education: What should be its true purpose? Do classrooms make sense anymore? What should individuals contribute to their own education? Are yesterday’s distinctions between subjects--and between the arts and sciences--still meaningful? What would the ideal lifelong education look like--at K-12, in universities, in the workplace, and beyond? Ackoff and Greenberg each have experience making radical change work--successfully. Here, they combine deep idealism with a relentless focus on the real world--and arrive at solutions that are profoundly sensible and powerfully compelling. Why today’s educational system fails--and why superficial reforms won’t help The questions politicians won’t ask--and the answers they don’t want to hear How do people learn--and why do they choose to learn? Creating schools that reflect what we know about learning In a 21st century democracy, what values must we nurture? ...and why aren’t we nurturing them? How can tomorrow’s “ideal schools” be operated and funded? A plan that cuts through political gridlock and can actually work Beyond schools: building a society of passionate lifelong learners Learning from childhood to college to workplace through retirement Reinventing Learning for the Next Century: How We Can, and Why We Must An extraordinary conversation about the very deepest questions... Today, what is education for? Where should it take place? How? When? What is the ideal school? The ideal lifelong learning experience? Who should be in charge of education? And who pays for it all? Over the past 150 years, virtually everything has changed...except education. Schools were designed as factories, to train factory workers. The factories are gone, but the schools haven’t changed. It’s time for us to return to first principles...or formulate new first principles...and reimagine education from the ground up. In Turning Learning Right Side Up, two of this generation’s most provocative thinkers--and practical doers--have done just that. They draw on the latest scientific research, the most enduring human wisdom, and their unique lifelong personal experiences transforming institutions that resist change. And, along the way, they offer a powerful blueprint for a thriving society of passionate lifelong learners.
Main Description
In the year's most provocative conversation, legendary systems scientist Dr. Ackoff and education innovator Greenberg offer a radically new path forward and take on the very deepest questions about education. Along the way, they offer a powerful blueprint for a thriving society of passionate, lifelong learners.
Main Description
The radically new future of education: reinventing learning for the 21st century, and beyond. bull; Taking on the very deepest questions: What is education for? What should we teach? Who should teach? Where? How? Who should be in charge? And who pays? bull; Reinventing lifelong learning: crafting the ideal education for children, college students, working people, retirees . . . everyone! bull; By two of the world's leading experts in driving fundamental change.
Long Description
Over the past 150 years, virtually everything has changed... except education. In the age of the Internet, we educate people much as we did during the industrial revolution. We educate them for a world that no longer exists, instilling values that are antithetical to those of a free, 21st century democracy. Perhaps worst of all, too many schools extinguish the human creativity and joy they ought to nourish. In this book, legendary systems scientist Dr. Russell Ackoff and "in-the-trenches" education innovator Daniel Greenberg offer a radically new path forward. In the year's most provocative conversation, they take on the very deepest questions about education: What should be its true purpose? Must schools be the way they are? Do classrooms make sense anymore? What should we teach? What should individuals contribute to their own education? What if students did the teaching and teachers did the learning? Is it possible to eliminate old-fashioned distinctions between subjects and between the arts and sciences? What would the ideal lifelong education look like: at the K-12 level, at universities and colleges, in the workplace, and beyond? How do you educate for a world that doesn't yet exist? And how do you pay for tomorrow's "ideal schools"? Ackoff and Greenberg each bring a lifetime of success making radical change. Here, they combine deep idealism with a relentless focus on the real world and arrive at solutions that make far more sense than anything we're doing now.
Table of Contents
Preface: Why and How This Book Was Written
What Education Is About
Where Today's Educational System Failsp. 1
Learning and Teachingp. 3
The Classroom Environmentp. 23
Subjects and Disciplinesp. 39
The New Worldp. 49
Antidemocratic Schoolingp. 65
Factors That Resist Changep. 71
Factors That Contribute to Educationp. 77
The Environment a Developed Society Provides for Individual Realizationp. 79
The Special Demands the Environment of a Liberal Democracy Places on Individual Realizationp. 91
What Individuals Contribute to Their Own Educationp. 99
The Place of Artsp. 107
Envisioning Ideal Lifelong Educationp. 119
Why, and How, We Should Be Envisioning an Ideal Educational Environmentp. 121
The Preschool Yearsp. 125
A New Look at Schools K-12p. 135
The College and University Experiencep. 139
Education and the Working Lifep. 147
Taking "Retire" Out of Retirementp. 151
Excursus: Funding Ideal Schoolsp. 153
Sudbury Valley Schoolp. 159
Postscriptp. 173
Endnotesp. 175
Indexp. 187
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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