Catalogue


United States foreign policy and the prospects for peace education /
Carl Mirra ; with forewords by Johan Galtung and Staughton Lynd.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
description
x, 226 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0786433213 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786433216 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.
isbn
0786433213 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786433216 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
The tasks of peace education -- The contours of U.S. foreign policy: a critical peace education perspective -- Unacknowledged guilt and U.S. militarism -- George W. Bush and the resurrection of the chosenness syndrome after September 11: a unique challenge for peace education -- The war on "terrorism," Iraq and the challenges for peace education -- The International Criminal Court as a peace educator: a challenge for the United States -- Toward a critical peace pedagogy of nonviolent tension.
abstract
"U.S. policies toward diplomatic peace education are coming under increasing scrutiny. This book evaluates the prospects for effective U.S. peace education in the context of post-1945 U.S. foreign policy"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
6425282
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-220) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Carl Mirra is an associate professor in the Ruth S. Ammon School of Education at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-11-01:
Mirra (Adelphi Univ.) asserts that peace education offers a chance to unlock the motives behind US military intervention in the world. Mirra presents compelling cases of US hypocrisy when it comes to military interventions and war. He shows that such actions run against the values of freedom, self-determination, and democracy that the US advocates at home and abroad. Teaching peace requires the adoption of teaching methods that promote critical thinking and participatory learning. Mirra cites the works of educational philosophers such as Peter McLaren and Henry Giroux and liberation theology advocates such as Paulo Freire as a guide to this type of education. Mirra believes that these teaching methods will promote peace education and may eventually affect the country's foreign policy. Certainly Mirra is to be commended for advocating these methods of teaching and learning, but the extent to which such methods may affect US foreign policies remains unclear. Mirra correctly asserts that teaching peace should take place in high school and college, but the motivation should not be because of the country's aggressive foreign policy, but rather because such teachings would reflect the cultural values of US society, irrespective of the government's foreign policies. Summing Up: Recommended. All undergraduate, graduate, and research collections. F. Abboushi Felician College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is an evaluation of the prospects for effective US peace education in the context of post-1945 US foreign policy. It documents the disparity between US pronouncements about protecting human rights and the country's systematic erosion of those rights in the international arena.
Title Summary
"In light of the American experience with terrorism and the controversial war in Iraq, U.S. policies toward peace education are coming under increasing scrutiny. This book examines the prospects." "The work documents the disparity between U.S. pronouncements about protecting human rights and the systematic erosion of those rights in the international arena, evaluates the challenges the war on terrorism poses for peace education, and examines new ways of thinking. Designed for educators, the book offers proposals for addressing contentious foreign policy issues and includes an appendix of primary documents and sample questions."--BOOK JACKET.
Main Description
In light of the United States' "age of terrorism" and the controversial involvement in the war in Iraq, U.S. policies toward diplomatic peace education are coming under increasing scrutiny. This book evaluates the prospects for effective U.S. peace education in the context of post-1945 U.S. foreign policy. The work first documents the disparity between U.S. pronouncements about protecting human rights and the country's systematic erosion of those rights in the international arena. Second, it evaluates the challenges that the war on terrorism poses for peace education and explores the importance of international treaties in upholding security. A final section explores new ways of thinking and relating that are ultimately necessary for the realization of nonviolent peacekeeping efforts. Designed as a resource text for U.S. educators, the text offers concrete proposals for addressing contentious foreign policy issues in the classroom and includes an appendix of primary documents and sample questions for easy use.
Description for Library
"U.S. policies toward diplomatic peace education are coming under increasing scrutiny. This book evaluates the prospects for effective U.S. peace education in the context of post-1945 U.S. foreign policy"--Provided by publisher.
Long Description
The work first documents the disparity between U.S. pronouncements about protecting human rights and the country's systematic erosion of those rights in the international arena. Second, it evaluates the challenges that the war on terrorism poses for peace education and explores the importance of international treaties in upholding security. A final section explores new ways of thinking and relating that are ultimately necessary for the realization of nonviolent peacekeeping efforts. Designed as a resource text for U.S. educators, the text offers concrete proposals for addressing contentious foreign policy issues in the classroom and includes an appendix of primary documents and sample questions for easy use.
Main Description
In light of the United States' "age of terrorism" and the controversial involvement in the war in Iraq, U.S. policies toward diplomatic peace education are coming under increasing scrutiny. This book evaluates the prospects for effective U.S. peace education in the context of post-1945 U.S. foreign policy.The work first documents the disparity between U.S. pronouncements about protecting human rights and the country's systematic erosion of those rights in the international arena. Second, it evaluates the challenges that the war on terrorism poses for peace education and explores the importance of international treaties in upholding security. A final section explores new ways of thinking and relating that are ultimately necessary for the realization of nonviolent peacekeeping efforts. Designed as a resource text for U.S. educators, the text offers concrete proposals for addressing contentious foreign policy issues in the classroom and includes an appendix of primary documents and sample questions for easy use.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Foreword: What Would the World Like the United States of America to Know about Peace? On Peace Education for Those Most in Needp. 1
Forewordp. 5
Prefacep. 13
Introductionp. 17
The Tasks of Peace Educationp. 23
The Contours of U.S. Foreign Policy: A Critical Peace Education Perspectivep. 35
Unacknowledged Guilt and U.S. Militarismp. 71
George W. Bush and the Resurrection of the Chosenness Syndrome after September 11: A Unique Challenge for Peace Educationp. 96
The War on "Terrorism," Iraq and the Challenges for Peace Educationp. 108
The International Criminal Court as a Peace Educator: A Challenge for the United Statesp. 130
Toward a Critical Peace Pedagogy of Nonviolent Tensionp. 136
Using Primary Documents to Teach Contemporary U.S. Foreign Policyp. 157
Examining the Military-Industrial Complexp. 158
Analyzing the Manipulation of Informationp. 162
Changing the Terminology from "War" to "Peace"p. 166
Notesp. 183
Bibliographyp. 207
Indexp. 221
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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