Catalogue


Tradition, treaties, and trade : Qing imperialism and Chosŏn Korea, 1850-1910 /
Kirk W. Larsen.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Asia Center : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 2008.
description
xi, 328 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0674028074 (cl : alk. paper), 9780674028074 (cl : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Asia Center : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 2008.
isbn
0674028074 (cl : alk. paper)
9780674028074 (cl : alk. paper)
contents note
Pre-nineteenth-century Sino-Korean relations -- Nineteenth-century challenges and changes -- Treaties and troops: bringing multilateral imperialism to Korea -- Soldiers, diplomats, and merchants: establishing a Qing presence in Korea -- The residency of Yuan Shikai -- Suzerainty, sovereignty, and ritual -- Yuan Shikai and "commercial warfare" in Korea -- Defending multilateral privilege at Suzerainty's end: the Sino-Japanese war and its aftermath -- Endings, echoes, and legacies.
catalogue key
6414381
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 297-318) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
This is a fine piece of diplomatic and political history that should become standard reading for anyone interested in the process of imperialism in late nineteenth-century East Asia.
This is an important and stimulating work, and it deserves to be widely read.
An important addition to the body of literature on the period of Korea's opening.
Its rich analysis of the Qing's interventionism sheds fresh and more varied light on interpreting Qing China's imperialism into Choson Korea at the turn of the twentieth century, not only in the history of Sino-Korean relation but in the larger historical and regional context of imperialism of the world.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Relations between the Choson and Qing states are often cited as the prime example of the operation of the traditional Chinese tribute system. In contrast, this work contends that the motivations, tactics and successes (and failures) of the late Qing Empire in Choson Korea mirrored those of other 19th-century imperialists.
Long Description
Relations between the Choson and Qing states are often cited as the prime example of the operation of the "traditional" Chinese "tribute system." In contrast, this work contends that the motivations, tactics, and successes (and failures) of the late Qing Empire in Choson Korea mirrored those of other nineteenth-century imperialists. Between 1850 and 1910, the Qing attempted to defend its informal empire in Korea by intervening directly, not only to preserve its geopolitical position but also to promote its commercial interests. And it utilized the technology of empire--treaties, international law, the telegraph, steamships, and gunboats. Although the transformation of Qing-Choson diplomacy was based on modern imperialism, this work argues that it is more accurate to describe the dramatic shift in relations in terms of flexible adaptation by one of the world's major empires in response to new challenges. Moreover, the new modes of Qing imperialism were a hybrid of East Asian and Western mechanisms and institutions. Through these means, the Qing Empire played a fundamental role in Korea's integration into regional and global political and economic systems.
Main Description
Relations between the Choson and Qing states are often cited as the prime example of the operation of the “traditional” Chinese “tribute system.” In contrast, this work contends that the motivations, tactics, and successes (and failures) of the late Qing Empire in Choson Korea mirrored those of other nineteenth-century imperialists. Between 1850 and 1910, the Qing attempted to defend its informal empire in Korea by intervening directly, not only to preserve its geopolitical position but also to promote its commercial interests. And it utilized the technology of empire-treaties, international law, the telegraph, steamships, and gunboats. Although the transformation of Qing-Choson diplomacy was based on modern imperialism, this work argues that it is more accurate to describe the dramatic shift in relations in terms of flexible adaptation by one of the world’s major empires in response to new challenges. Moreover, the new modes of Qing imperialism were a hybrid of East Asian and Western mechanisms and institutions. Through these means, the Qing Empire played a fundamental role in Korea’s integration into regional and global political and economic systems.
Main Description
Relations between the Choson and Qing states are often cited as the prime example of the operation of the "traditional" Chinese "tribute system." In contrast, this work contends that the motivations, tactics, and successes (and failures) of the late Qing Empire in Choson Korea mirrored those of other nineteenth-century imperialists. Between 1850 and 1910, the Qing attempted to defend its informal empire in Korea by intervening directly, not only to preserve its geopolitical position but also to promote its commercial interests. And it utilized the technology of empire-treaties, international law, the telegraph, steamships, and gunboats. Although the transformation of Qing-Choson diplomacy was based on modern imperialism, this work argues that it is more accurate to describe the dramatic shift in relations in terms of flexible adaptation by one of the world's major empires in response to new challenges. Moreover, the new modes of Qing imperialism were a hybrid of East Asian and Western mechanisms and institutions. Through these means, the Qing Empire played a fundamental role in Korea's integration into regional and global political and economic systems.
Table of Contents
Conventions and Abbreviationsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Pre-Nineteenth-Century Sino-Korean Relationsp. 23
Nineteenth-Century Challenges and Changesp. 43
Treaties and Troops: Bringing Multilateral Imperialism to Koreap. 72
Soldiers, Diplomats, and Merchants: Establishing a Qing Presence in Koreap. 95
The Residency of Yuan Shikaip. 128
Suzerainty, Sovereignty, and Ritualp. 164
Yuan Shikai and "Commercial Warfare" in Koreap. 197
Defending Multilateral Privilege at Suzerainty's End: The Sino-Japanese War and Its Aftermathp. 231
Endings, Echoes, and Legaciesp. 272
Reference Matter
Works Citedp. 297
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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