Catalogue


Thirty ways of looking at Hillary : reflections by women writers /
edited by Susan Morrison.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York, NY : HarperCollins Publishers, c2008.
description
xv, 254 p. ; 22 cm
ISBN
0061455938 :, 9780061455933 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York, NY : HarperCollins Publishers, c2008.
isbn
0061455938 :
9780061455933 :
contents note
Yellow pantsuit / by Amy Wilentz -- The tyranny of high expectations / by Elizabeth Kolbert -- Hillary Rotten / by Katha Pollitt -- Political animals / by Susan Orlean -- Boys and girls / by Lorrie Moore -- The ballad of Bill and Hill / by Daphne Merkin -- Monarchy in the making / by Lionel Shriver -- All hail Betty Boop / by Rebecca Mead -- My generation / by Jane Kramer -- Re: Hillary / by Roz Chast -- Fate is a feminist issue / by Judith Thurman -- Hillary's list / by Susan Cheever -- Cheating / by Ariel Levy -- The validator / by Kathryn Harrison -- The wife, the candidate, the senator, and her husband / by Letty Cottin Pogrebin -- Elect Sister Frigidaire / by Katie Roiphe -- From the 1965 Eyrie yearbook / by Patricia Marx -- The double bind / by Deborah Tannen -- Firm Hillary / by Susan Lehman -- Medusa for president / by Laura Kipnis -- How hungry is Hillary / by Mimi Sheraton -- Confessions of a Hillary hagiographer / by Judith Warner -- Can you forgive her? / by Dahlia Lithwick -- Macramé, anyone? / by Lauren Collins -- Hillary's underpants / by Lara Vapnyar -- The self-reliance thing / by Marie Brenner -- The road to Cleavagate / by Robin Givhan -- Cold snap : the sorceress problem by Susanna Moore -- Hello, my name is-- / by Cristina Henríquez -- Beyond gender / by Leslie Bennetts.
abstract
An evaluation of Hillary Clinton by thirty women writers considers her political career and prospects from supportive and less favorable perspectives, in a volume that includes contributions by such names as Deborah Tannen, Susan Cheever, and Lorrie Moore.
catalogue key
6407164
A Look Inside
First Chapter
Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary
Reflections by Women Writers

Chapter One

Yellow Pantsuit

What if you could never say what you really felt?

By Amy Wilentz

My generation definitely has a Clinton problem. The problem consists in what psychiatrists call transference: the men and women of the baby boom take what we imagine ourselves to be, all the myths and ideas and emotions of our cultural and political selves, and then we project it onto the Clintons. What a burden for them, I often think. But then, they asked for it.

We can't help but identify with these two bizarre creatures—the grand Democratic figures of our adulthood, the Mom and Pop of the Me generation—even though the creatures were formed in Arkansas. Frankly, there are no other Arkansans with whom I've ever identified. I can't say I've ever met a person from Arkansas, except for Bill Clinton. Even though he was president, he seemed to typify the Arkansan breed in those few seconds I shared with him: he used the words "might" and "could," one right after the other, something I'd never heard before outside the Li'l Abner comic strip.

Do you think things will turn out well for Haiti, I asked him.

"Well," said the president thoughtfully. "They might could."

Our Clinton problem now, of course, is Hillary (for the moment, Bill's only a useful accessory, like Barbie's Ken, except Bill has that extra part that sometimes gives trouble). Just as Bill raised issues for men of our generation about what kind of man one should be, what kind of leader, husband, father, etc., so Hillary raises similar issues for women.

Personally, when men are running for office, or have been elected, I don't wonder what it's like to be them; or not very often. I have to say that I did wonder what it could possibly be like to be George Bush when he was sitting in a schoolroom reading about a goat while the World Trade Center was falling down. I did wonder why Howard Dean made that funny noise, I wondered about Bill Clinton's cigar wielding, and I did wonder about Ronald Reagan's inner life. Male politicians have their moments of head-spinning eccentricity that make you curious. Usually, though, it's an abstract humanity that one shares with balding, compressed-lip men, in suits, ties, and wing tips.

But Hillary is different. From the day she appeared on the national scene, I've been identifying, or at least trying to identify, with her, her goals, and most of all, her character (the hardest thing to pin down). I have always wondered what it would be like to be her, even though the "her" I'm wondering about has certainly changed over the past fifteen years.

Sometimes, my instinctive desire to identify reminds me of childhood fantasies about inappropriate or silly exemplary figures. Like many girls of ten, I would lie on my bed and wonder so hard about what it would be like to be Nancy Drew with all those adventures, climbing up a ruined mansion's chimney, driving around in the red roadster. I would wonder so hard about what it might feel like to be Jackie Kennedy, a beautiful and romantic widow. I would imagine so intensely being Clara Barton and wiping the feverish brow of a wounded soldier. There was something about each of these figures, I felt, that was just like me.

With Hillary, that feeling is more intense but less romantic. From the beginning, I looked at her and I couldn't help thinking that in many ways, I am like her and she is like me. I'm a Democrat and so is she. I'm a liberal and so—arguably—is she. We're both middle-class suburbanites. She's only a few years older than I. Okay, she's from Illinois, but is that so different from my home state, New Jersey? Illinois is working-class, a labor state, on America's hidden third coast (the Great Lakes), and as blue as they come. And I was amused and impressed by what Hillary said about baking during the first Clinton presidential campaign in 1992: "I've done the best I can to lead my life. . . .You know, I suppose I could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas, but what I decided to do was fulfill my profession." That resonated.

I remember feeling delighted when she said that. I thought: there's our voice. The statement had a tone to it: arrogant, dismissive, irritated, ambitious, dedicated. She got ripped for it, of course: What's wrong with baking cookies, Hillary, huh? Are you too good for that? But she did think she was too good for that, and so did hundreds of thousands of us. We were made for things that were better than baking. It was before women decided it was better to leave the workforce and be good mothers. (In a post-feminist apologia, may I add that I have become a fairly accomplished bread baker—from scratch, without a machine—and I have also baked three children's birthday cakes per year for going on twelve years now. You can have it all.)

In fact, my apologia is very much in the style of the revised Hillary. Much to my dismay, I discovered, when I Googled "Hillary baking," that she has actually managed to get her name associated with a recipe for chocolate-chip cookies (one that uses oatmeal and a cup of vegetable shortening and that sounds awful). In 1992, after the infamous "baking" comment, Hillary—who rarely takes a step forward without taking two back, we now know—entered this cookie formula into a Family Circle magazine bake-off against other candidates' wives' recipes. She won. Of course. It is reasonable to assume that she did this in order to vitiate the original baking comment that stirred so much right-wing anger.

This to-and-froing is the kind of thing that has led women to wonder about Hillary, and that keeps them riveted. Her early, less self-conscious, less visibly political behavior was a confidence deposit that has—for . . .

Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary
Reflections by Women Writers
. Copyright © by Susan Morrison. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Excerpted from Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary: Reflections by Women Writers by Susan Morrison
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, December 2007
Boston Globe, January 2008
PW Annex Reviews, January 2008
New York Times Book Review, February 2008
Los Angeles Times, March 2008
New York Times Full Text Review, October 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
A collection of original writings by women about Hillary Rodham Clinton as she heads into the 2008 Presidential campaign. The election is almost two years away, but Hillary has been in the public eye for twenty years, and there is no other politician who inspires such a wide range of passionate feelings, particularly among women. To some women she's a sellout who changed her name and her hairstyle when it suited her husband's career; to others she's a hardworking idealist with the political savvy to work effectively within the system. Where one person sees a carpetbagger, another sees a dedicated politician; where one sees a humiliated and long-suffering wife, another sees a dignified First Lady. Is she tainted by the scandals of her husband's presidency, or has she gained experience and authority from weathering his missteps? Cold or competent, overachiever or pioneer, too radical or too moderate, Hillary Clinton continues to overturn the assumptions we make about her. It is hard to imagine a political figure of more compelling interest right now.
Long Description
No other politician inspires such a wide range of passionate feelings as Hillary Rodham Clinton. As America's first viable female candidate for president, she has become the repository of many women's contradictory hopes and fears. To some she's a sellout who changed her name and her hairstyle when it suited her husband's career; to others she's a hardworking idealist with the political savvy to work effectively within the system. Where one person sees a carpetbagger, another sees a dedicated politician; where one sees a humiliated and long-suffering wife, another sees a dignified First Lady. Is she tainted by the scandals of her husband's presidency, or has she gained experience and authority from weathering his missteps? Cold or competent, overachiever or pioneer, too radical or too moderate, Hillary Clinton continues to overturn the assumptions we make about her. In "Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary," New Yorker editor Susan Morrison has compiled this timely collection of thirty original pieces by America's most notable women writers. This pointillistic portrait paints a composite picture of Hillary Clinton, focusing on details from the personal to the political, from the hard-hitting to the whimsical, to give a well-balanced and unbiased view of the woman who may be our first Madam President. Taken together, these essays--by such renowned writers as Daphne Merkin, Lorrie Moore, Deborah Tannen, Susan Cheever, Lionel Shriver Kathryn Harrison, and Susan Orlean--illuminate the attitudes that women have toward the powerful women around them and constitute a biography that is must reading for anyone interested in understanding this complex and controversial politician.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Yellow Pantsuitp. 1
The Tyranny of High Expectationsp. 9
Hillary Rottenp. 16
Political Animalsp. 24
Boys and Girlsp. 29
The Ballad of Bill and Hillp. 37
Monarchy in the Makingp. 47
All Hail Betty Boopp. 57
My Generationp. 65
Re: Hillaryp. 72
Fate Is a Feminist Issuep. 74
Hillary's Listp. 80
Cheatingp. 87
The Validatorp. 94
The Wife, the Candidate, the Senator, and Her Husbandp. 104
Elect Sister Frigidairep. 116
From the 1965 Eyrie Yearbookp. 124
The Double Bindp. 126
Firm Hillaryp. 140
Medusa for Presidentp. 148
How Hungry Is Hillary?p. 159
Confessions of a Hillary Hagiographerp. 167
Can You Forgive Her?p. 175
Macrame, Anyone?p. 183
Hillary's Underpantsp. 190
The Self-Reliance Thingp. 197
The Road to Cleavagegatep. 208
Cold Snap: The Sorceress Problemp. 217
Hello, My Name Is ...p. 224
Beyond Genderp. 230
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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