Catalogue


A kingly craft : art and leadership in Ethiopia : a social history of art and visual culture in pre-modern Africa /
Earnestine Jenkins.
imprint
Lanham : University Press of America, c2008.
description
xviii, 115 p., [28] p. of plates : ill., map ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0761838899 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780761838890 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham : University Press of America, c2008.
isbn
0761838899 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780761838890 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Eighteenth century political culture in Shewan Province: chiefs, wars, and conquests -- Shewa's first patron of the arts: Amha Iyasus and his Miracles of Mary manuscript -- Ruler and saint: Asfa Wassan and holy man, Takla Haymanot: secular themes in late eigtheenth century manuscript painting -- King Sahle Selassie and the infrastructure of patronage in early nineteenth century Shewa -- Painting authority: a double portrait, shared power: the 'Queen Mother' and the king -- Sahle Selassie, iconography, and the ideal king: King David as a model of Christian leadership -- A 'killer of heathens' and a leader of men: Sahle Selassie, Christian warrior king -- Duty and leisure: King Sahle Selassie at court -- On a patriarchal note: painting history and honoring the father in Sahle Selassie's prayer book -- Coda the cultural legacy of the 'House of Shewa'.
general note
Rev. ed. of author's dissertation, Michigan State Univ., 1998--P. vii.
catalogue key
6406381
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 103-110) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Earnestine Jenkins is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Memphis.
Reviews
Review Quotes
This study is well-written, interesting, and epistemologically important. Jenkins' analyses and arguments are informed, interesting, sometimes provocative, and often fun to read.
Jenkin's analysis of the thirty images she utilizes is meticulous and thorough, and clearly demonstrates her argument that Shewa's rulers influenced the production of illuminated manuscripts, particularly with regard to the inclusion of secular imagery and unique aspects of their lives and courts…. A Kingly Craft will certainly be of interest to Ethiopianists, particularly those in the field of history or visual culture….Jenkins's in-depth analysis of individual images is excellent, and her argument regarding Shewan rulers' impact on the increasing use of secular imagery in Ethiopian painting is convincing and well supported.
Jenkin's analysis of the thirty images she utilizes is meticulous and thorough, and clearly demonstrates her argument that Shewa's rulers influenced the production of illuminated manuscripts, particularly with regard to the inclusion of secular imagery and unique aspects of their lives and courts . A Kingly Craft will certainly be of interest to Ethiopianists, particularly those in the field of history or visual culture .Jenkins's in-depth analysis of individual images is excellent, and her argument regarding Shewan rulers' impact on the increasing use of secular imagery in Ethiopian painting is convincing and well supported.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2008
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Summaries
Title Summary
"A Kingly Craft is a significant contribution to the interdisciplinary fields of African art history and visual studies. Ethiopian-illuminated manuscripts have been regarded as remarkable expressions of Christian art and material culture. However, until recently, the elite art form of manuscript production has not been rigorously examined within specific social, cultural, and political contexts. This work is an innovative study of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century manuscript painting during a critical period of Ethiopian history known as the "Era of the Princes."" "Focusing on manuscripts commissioned by members of an influential dynasty in the province of Shewa, the book draws attention to the relationship between art and patronage. Shewan leaders commissioned books with illustrations that were increasingly narrative and secular, visually documenting historical events, everyday life at court, and the portrayal of political concepts. This analysis also explores how local leaders in an independent African kingdom used art to establish links with a glorious past, thereby legitimizing their authority and preserving their great deeds for the future."--BOOK JACKET.
Long Description
A Kingly Craft is a significant contribution to the interdisciplinary fields of African art history and visual studies. Ethiopian illuminated manuscripts have been regarded as remarkable expressions of Christian art and material culture. However, until recently, the elite art form of manuscript production has not been rigorously examined within specific social, cultural, and political contexts. This work is an innovative study of eighteenth and nineteenth century manuscript painting during a critical period of Ethiopian history known as the "Era of the Princes." Focusing on manuscripts comissioned by members of an influential dynasty in the province of Shewa, the book draws attention to the relationship between art and patronage. Shewan leaders commissioned books with illustrations that were increasingly narrative and secular, visually documenting historical events, everyday life at court, and the portrayal of political concepts. This analysis also explores how local leaders in an independent African kingdom used art to establish links with a glorious past, thereby legitimizing their authority and preserving their great deeds for the future.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. v
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. ix
The Politics of Visual Culture in Eighteenth Century Shewa: Chiefs, Patronage, and Early Images of Authority
Eighteenth Century Political Culture in Shewan Province: Chiefs, Wars, and Conquestsp. 3
Shewa's First Patron of the Arts: Amha Iyasus and His Miracles of Mary Manuscriptp. 10
Ruler and Saint: Asfa Wassan and Holy Man, Takla Haymanot: Secular Themes in Late Eighteenth Century Manuscript Paintingp. 25
The Nineteenth Century: King Sahle Selassie and the Court Art Tradition
King Sahle Selassie and the Infrastructure of Patronage in Early Nineteenth Century Shewap. 41
Painting Authority: A Double Portrait, Shared Power: the 'Queen Mother' and the Kingp. 51
Sahle Selassie, Iconography, and the Ideal King: King David as a Model of Christian Leadershipp. 59
A 'Killer of Heathens' and a Leader of Men: Sahle Selassie, Christian Warrior Kingp. 67
Duty and Leisure: King Sahle Selassie at Courtp. 78
On a Patriarchal Note: Painting History and Honoring the Father in Sahle Selassie's Prayer Bookp. 91
Coda: The Cultural Legacy of the 'House of Shewa'p. 97
Bibliographyp. 103
Indexp. 111
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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