Catalogue


The Black aesthetic unbound : theorizing the dilemma of eighteenth-century African American literature /
April C. E. Langley.
imprint
Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2008.
description
xiv, 210 p.
ISBN
0814210775 (alk. paper), 9780814210772 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2008.
isbn
0814210775 (alk. paper)
9780814210772 (alk. paper)
contents note
The dilemma of a ghost : early Black American literature and its mournings/moorings -- What a difference a "way" makes : Wheatley's ways of knowing -- Kaleidoscopic re-memory in Equiano's "Interesting narrative" : shifting the lens to replace the landscapes -- Reading "others" in eighteenth-century Afr0-British American literature : the promise and the dilemma of new ways of reading -- Concluding remarks.
catalogue key
6395858
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"April Langley persuasively argues that scholars of African American literary history cannot divorce from their work any one of the three elements of the coherent tripartite world made up of Africa, Britain, and British North America." --Joycelyn Moody, editor of African American Review and Sue E. Denman Distinguished Chair in American Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio
"April Langley persuasively argues that scholars of African American literary history cannot divorce from their work any one of the three elements of the coherent tripartite world made up of Africa, Britain, and British North America." -Joycelyn Moody, editor of African American Review and Sue E. Denman Distinguished Chair in American Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio
"April Langley persuasively argues that scholars of African American literary history cannot divorce from their work any one of the three elements of the coherent tripartite world made up of Africa, Britain, and British North America." -Joycelyn Moody, editor ofAfrican American Reviewand Sue E. Denman Distinguished Chair in American Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
During the era of the slave trade, more than 12 million Africans were brought as slaves to the Americas. Their memories, ideas, beliefs, and practices would forever reshape its history and cultures. April C. E. Langley's The Black Aesthetic Unbound exposes the dilemma of the literal, metaphorical, and rhetorical question, "What is African in African American literature?" Confronting the undeniable imprints of West African culture and consciousness in early black writing such as Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative or Phillis Wheatley's poetry, the author conceives eighteenth-century Black Experience to be literally and figuratively encompassing and inextricably linked to Africa, Europe, and America.Consequently, this book has three aims: to locate the eighteenth century as the genesis of the cultural and historical movements which mark twentieth-century black aestheticism-known as the Black Aesthetic; to analyze problematic associations of African identity as manifested in an essentialized Afro-America; and to study the relationship between specific West African modes of thought and expression and the emergence of a black aesthetic in eighteenth-century North America. By exploring how Senegalese, Igbo, and other West African traditions provide striking new lenses for reading poetry and prose by six significant writers, Langley offers a fresh perspective on this important era in our literary history. Ultimately, the author confronts the difficult dilemma of how to use diasporic, syncretic, and vernacular theories of Black culture to think through the massive cultural transformations wrought by the Middle Passage.
Main Description
During the era of the slave trade, more than 12 million Africans were brought as slaves to the Americas. Their memories, ideas, beliefs, and practices would forever reshape its history and cultures. April C. E. Langley's The Black Aesthetic Unbound exposes the dilemma of the literal, metaphorical, and rhetorical question, "What is African in African American literature?" Confronting the undeniable imprints of West African culture and consciousness in early black writing such as Olaudah Equiano's The Interesting Narrative or Phillis Wheatley's poetry, the author conceives eighteenth-century Black Experience to be literally and figuratively encompassing and inextricably linked to Africa, Europe, and America.Consequently, this book has three aims: to locate the eighteenth century as the genesis of the cultural and historical movements which mark twentieth-century black aestheticism--known as the Black Aesthetic; to analyze problematic associations of African identity as manifested in an essentialized Afro-America; and to study the relationship between specific West African modes of thought and expression and the emergence of a black aesthetic in eighteenth-century North America. By exploring how Senegalese, Igbo, and other West African traditions provide striking new lenses for reading poetry and prose by six significant writers, Langley offers a fresh perspective on this important era in our literary history. Ultimately, the author confronts the difficult dilemma of how to use diasporic, syncretic, and vernacular theories of Black culture to think through the massive cultural transformations wrought by the Middle Passage.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Historical and Cultural Recovery: Eighteenth-Century Scholarship and the Politics of Visibilityp. 1
The Dilemma of a Ghost: Early Black American Literature and Its Mournings/Mooringsp. 17
What a Difference a "Way" Makes: Wheatley's Ways of Knowingp. 57
Kaleidoscopic Re-memory in Equiano's Interesting Narrative: Shifting the Lens to Replace the Landscapesp. 97
Reading "Others" in Eighteenth-Century Afro-British American Literature: The Promise and the Dilemma of New Ways of Readingp. 139
Concluding Remarksp. 155
Notesp. 161
Bibliographyp. 185
Indexp. 199
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem