Catalogue


Writing women's worlds : Bedouin stories /
Lila Abu-Lughod.
edition
15th anniversary ed.
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, c2008.
description
xxxvii, 267 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780520256514
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, c2008.
isbn
9780520256514
catalogue key
6395730
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-267).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lila Abu-Lughod is Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-04:
In this beautifully written book, Abu-Lughod, an Arab American anthropologist, presents stories, anecdotes, and reminiscences she recorded in the course of her research on women in a small Bedouin community in western Egypt. Collected from a handful of kinswomen, these diverse narratives are skillfully edited and rearranged by Abu-Lughod to illustrate the dynamics of such patriarchal institutions as patrilineality, polygyny, and arranged marriages and their impact on the lives of individual men and women. More than just providing the reader with a look into the private lives of Bedouin women, these stories are meant to demonstrate the shortcomings of anthropological and feminist theory and the politics of ethnograpic representation. These issues are fully addressed in the book's lengthy and skillfully argued introductory essay in which the author critically assesses the role of the anthropologist in creating and maintaining the myth of the culturally distinct "Other." An important contribution to the study of culture theory, gender ideologies, and Arab society. Advanced undergraduate; graduate; faculty. A. Rassam; Queens College, CUNY
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-11-01:
Abu-Lughod, a Palestinian American anthropologist and author of Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society (Univ. of California Pr., 1986), is well known for her research on Arab women. In this second book based on her fieldwork among the Awlad Ali Bedouin in northwestern Egypt, she hopes to convey in greater depth the richness and complexity of these Bedouin women's lives through their stories, songs, poetry, and essays. Despite editorial comment by Abu-Lughod throughout (a lengthy introduction discusses her approaches to anthropological fieldwork and ethnographic writing), the Bedouin women themselves are the primary voices in the book (translated by the author). Although this is definitely a scholarly anthropological work, the informed reader can also find much of interest. The tales these women tell, which illuminate their relations to the world around them, have a universal appeal. Highly recommended for academic libraries and public libraries with strong Middle East or women's studies collections.-- Ruth K. Baacke, Bellingham P.L., Wash . (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
For over a decade beginning in 1978, Lila Abu-Lughod lived, on and off, in the small Awlad 'Ali Bedouin community in Egypt. She witnessed striking changes, both cultural and economic, and recorded the stories of the women for this book.
Bowker Data Service Summary
For over a decade beginning in 1978, Lila Abu-Lughod lived, on and off, in the small Awlad 'Ali Bedouin community in Egypt. She witnessed strinking changes, both cultural and economic, and recorded the stories of the women for this book.
Main Description
For over a decade beginning in 1978, Lila Abu-Lughod lived, on and off, in the small Awlad 'Ali Bedouin community in Egypt. She witnessed striking changes, both cultural and economic, and she recorded the stories of the women. This edition is updated with a new preface by the author. She argues for the special urgency in today's polarized world of using knowledge of the particular lives of others to counter general images of "the Muslim woman" and to bring nuance and substance to feminist debates about culture and rights.
Long Description
Lila Abu-Lughod draws on anthropological and feminist insights to construct a critical ethnography of a small Awlad 'Ali Bedouin community in Egypt. She explores how the telling of stories of everyday life challenges the power of anthropological theory to render adequately the lives of others and the way feminist theory appropriates Third World women.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Preface to the Fifteenth Anniversary Editionp. xi
Preface to the First Editionp. xxv
Acknowledgmentsp. xxxiii
Keeping the Names Straightp. xxxvii
Introductionp. 1
Patrilinealityp. 45
Polygynyp. 87
Reproductionp. 127
Patrilateral Parallel-Cousin Marriagep. 167
Honor and Shamep. 205
Transcriptions of Arabic Poems and Songsp. 243
Bibliographyp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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