Catalogue


One man great enough : Abraham Lincoln's road to Civil War /
John C. Waugh.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Orlando : Harcourt, c2007.
description
479 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0151010714, 9780151010714
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Orlando : Harcourt, c2007.
isbn
0151010714
9780151010714
catalogue key
6394237
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [455]-463) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2007-12-01:
Journalist Waugh sketches Lincoln from his parentage up to the attack on Fort Sumpter. His easy and good-humored style will appeal to many readers. He does not forsake arguably unreliable narrators, such as Lincoln cousin Dennis Hanks and while some scholars might object, others will see the magic in keeping such voices with us in following Lincoln's journey. Recommended for public and undergraduate libraries. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2007-09-17:
Former Christian Science Monitor journalist Waugh is the author of six books on the Civil War, including Re-electing Lincoln, perhaps the most accessible and complete volume on the pivotal presidential election of 1864. In his latest book, Waugh employs the same combination of lively prose backed with solid research to examine Lincoln's life story from birth to his first presidential inauguration, rarely straying from the themes of the future of the Union, impending Civil War and, more importantly, slavery. Waugh covers the events in Lincoln's pre-April 1861 life, making liberal use of Lincoln's own words, primarily from letters and speeches, and the reminiscences of one of Lincoln's closest friends and associates, his former law partner William Herndon. Waugh shows that although Lincoln embraced white supremacy and opposed interracial marriage and black suffrage during his early years as an Illinois state legislator, he managed to separate those views from his strong opposition to the institution of slavery. "If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong," Lincoln later said. "I can not remember when I did not so think, and feel." Waugh is particular adept at weaving details of Lincoln's family life into the narrative, which focuses on decidedly political matters, including the 1858 Lincoln-Douglas debates and the 1860 presidential election campaign. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
PRAISE FOR REELECTING LINCOLN " Reelecting Lincoln . . . brings a great deal of discrete information together in an informative fashion and it is, as Waugh well knows--and well tells it--a terrific story." -- The Washington Post "Waugh . . . recounts the 1864 election with great narrative skill. The story sweeps along, with brilliant vignettes of all the players in the drama and one vivid scene after another." -- The New York Times Book Review
PRAISE FORREELECTING LINCOLN "Reelecting Lincoln. . . brings a great deal of discrete information together in an informative fashion and it is, as Waugh well knows--and well tells it--a terrific story." --The Washington Post "Waugh . . . recounts the 1864 election with great narrative skill. The story sweeps along, with brilliant vignettes of all the players in the drama and one vivid scene after another." --The New York Times Book Review
PRAISE FOR ONE MAN GREAT ENOUGH "A swift-paced narrative of Lincoln's pre-presidential life." -Washington Post Book World "Waugh is a smooth and gifted writer . . . [His] description of life on the frontier and the prairies is fascinating." -Newark Star-Ledger
PRAISE FOR ONE MAN GREAT ENOUGH "A swift-paced narrative of Lincoln's pre-presidential life." --Washington Post Book World "Waugh is a smooth and gifted writer . . . [His] description of life on the frontier and the prairies is fascinating." --Newark Star-Ledger
"General audiences will delight in Waugh''s expansive narrative full of colorful anecdotes. This book vividly illustrates why Abraham Lincoln remains a touchstone for democracy."
PRAISE FOR ONE MAN GREAT ENOUGH "A swift-paced narrative of Lincoln's pre-presidential life. --Washington Post Book World "Waugh is a smooth and gifted writer . . . [His] description of life on the frontier and the prairies is fascinating. --Newark Star-Ledger
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, September 2007
Booklist, October 2007
Library Journal, December 2007
Washington Post, January 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
How did Abraham Lincoln, long held as a paragon of presidential bravery and principled politics, find his way to the White House? How did he become thisone man great enoughto risk the fate of the nation on the well-worn but cast-off notion that all men are created equal? Here award-winning historian John C. Waugh takes us on Lincoln's road to the Civil War. From Lincoln's first public rejection of slavery to his secret arrival in the capital, from his stunning debates with Stephen Douglas to his contemplative moments considering the state of the country he loved, Waugh shows us America as Lincoln saw it and as Lincoln described it. Much of this wonderful story is told by Lincoln himself, detailing through his own writing his emergence onto the political scene andthe evolution of his beliefs about the Union, the Constitution, democracy, slavery, and civil war. Waugh brings Lincoln's path into new reliefby letting the great man tell his own story, at a depth that brings us ever closer to understanding this mysterious, complicated, truly great man.
Main Description
The award-winning historian John C.Waugh takes us on Lincoln's road to the CivilWar. From Lincoln's first public rejection of slavery to his secret arrival in the capital, from his stunning debates with Stephen Douglas to his more contemplative moments,Waugh shows us America as Lincoln saw it and as Lincoln described it.Much of this wonderful story is told by Lincoln himself, detailing through his own writing his emergence onto the political scene and the evolution of his beliefs about the Union, the Constitution, democracy, slavery, and the buildup to the CivilWar. In this acclaimed biography,Waugh brings us ever closer to understanding this mysterious, complicated, and truly great man.
Main Description
How did Abraham Lincoln, long held as a paragon of presidential bravery and principled politics, find his way to the White House? How did he become this one man great enough to risk the fate of the nation on the well-worn but cast-off notion that all men are created equal?Here award-winning historian John C. Waugh takes us on Lincolns road to the Civil War. From Lincoln's first public rejection of slavery to his secret arrival in the capital, from his stunning debates with Stephen Douglas to his contemplative moments considering the state of the country he loved, Waugh shows us America as Lincoln saw it and as Lincoln described it. Much of this wonderful story is told by Lincoln himself, detailing through his own writing his emergence onto the political scene and the evolution of his beliefs about the Union, the Constitution, democracy, slavery, and civil war. Waugh brings Lincolns path into new relief by letting the great man tell his own story, at a depth that brings us ever closer to understanding this mysterious, complicated, truly great man.
Main Description
How did Abraham Lincoln, long held as a paragon of presidential bravery and principled politics, find his way to the White House? How did he become this one man great enough to risk the fate of the nation on the well-worn but cast-off notion that all men are created equal? Here award-winning historian John C. Waugh takes us on Lincoln's road to the Civil War. From Lincoln's first public rejection of slavery to his secret arrival in the capital, from his stunning debates with Stephen Douglas to his contemplative moments considering the state of the country he loved, Waugh shows us America as Lincoln saw it and as Lincoln described it. Much of this wonderful story is told by Lincoln himself, detailing through his own writing his emergence onto the political scene and the evolution of his beliefs about the Union, the Constitution, democracy, slavery, and civil war. Waugh brings Lincoln's path into new reliefby letting the great man tell his own story, at a depth that brings us ever closer to understanding this mysterious, complicated, truly great man.
Table of Contents
Prologue: The Uncoiling of the Serpentp. 1
Who He Was and Where He Came Fromp. 5
The Dark and Bloody Groundp. 7
The Hoosier Yearsp. 11
Making His Wayp. 21
New Salemp. 23
Politicsp. 33
Vandaliap. 39
The Issue's Dark Sidep. 47
Death in Altonp. 49
Political Enemies and Female Enigmasp. 61
Springfieldp. 63
Young Hickoryp. 73
The Ballyhoo Campaignp. 85
Lincoln in Lovep. 105
On the National Stagep. 117
The Steam Engine in Breeches and the Engine that Knew No Restp. 119
"Who Is James K. Polk?"p. 129
Laying Congressional Pipep. 143
Seeing Spotsp. 153
Eclipsep. 165
Lincoln's Other Lifep. 167
What He Had Becomep. 183
Tempestp. 193
Clash of the Giantsp. 201
Lincoln Emergesp. 203
Political Earthquakep. 221
At the Crossroadsp. 233
Axe Handles and Wedgesp. 239
A House Dividedp. 249
The Debatesp. 265
On the Glory Roadp. 285
Spreading the Gospelp. 287
Cooper Unionp. 295
Reaching for the Brass Ringp. 309
Chicagop. 319
From Ballots to Bulletsp. 339
The Four Legged Racep. 341
Firebell in the Nightp. 359
Getting Therep. 377
The War Comesp. 397
Epilogue: Twilight of the Little Giantp. 413
In Appreciationp. 419
Notesp. 422
Sources Citedp. 455
Indexp. 464
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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