Catalogue


Hidden in plain sight : the tragedy of children's rights from Ben Franklin to Lionel Tate /
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2008.
description
xvii, 357 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780691126906 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2008.
isbn
9780691126906 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
How to think about childhood -- How to think about children's rights -- Frederick Douglass : boys in slavery and servitude -- Dred Scott's daughters : girls at the intersection of race and patriarchy -- Growing up in state custody : Tony and John G. -- The printer's apprentice : Ben Franklin and youth speech -- Youth in the civil rights movement : John Lewis and Sheyanne Webb -- Old maids and little women : Louisa Alcott and William Cather -- Breaking the prison of disability : Helen Keller and Mara -- Hide and survive : Anne Frank and Liu -- Newsboys, entrepreneurs, and Evelyn : children at work -- Telling the scariest secrets: Maya Angelou and Jeannie -- Age and the idea of innocence : Amal and Lionel Tate.
catalogue key
6380812
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This moving and highly readable book reflects Woodhouse's long career as a distinguished family-law scholar and her deep reflection on the position of children in law and policy. She brings us riveting stories about famous people who, as children, have made significant contributions in areas such as gender equality and civil rights. Woodhouse presents us with the original and compelling argument that children should also have rights, not because they are potential adults, but because of the agency, courage, and vision they can and do exercise as children."--Martha Albertson Fineman, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of Law, Emory University"Woodhouse's superb, nuanced volume demonstrates the importance of treating children with dignity, shows the connection between children's needs and rights, and conveys how a developmentally based human rights framework can shape the balance between dependency and autonomy on the journey from childhood to adulthood."--Robert G. Schwartz, executive director of the Juvenile Law Center"This is a wonderful book that essentially teaches us, through the eyes of a child, what it means to be an American--or at least what it should mean. Through profound and beautifully told stories of the experiences of youth, Professor Woodhouse provides new insight and 'a new conversation' about the misunderstood and improperly politicized concept of children's rights."--Marvin Ventrell, president and CEO of the National Association of Counsel for Children"An intensely personal book, written with passion and conviction. Woodhouse does a highly effective job of conveying the importance of attending to children's voices and agency. This book is likely to attractpublic attention and spur public debate."--Steven Mintz, author of "Huck's Raft: A History of American Childhood""Woodhouse is a wise person of experience whose voice is an important one, because of her good sense, her compassion, and her well-earned reputation in the field. She is also an excellent writer who brings the law alive through her stories, and talks about important legal issues in language that all can understand."--Elizabeth Bartholet, author of "Nobody's Children" and "Family Bonds"
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-10-01:
With this thoroughly annotated, well-written book, Woodhouse (law, Univ. of Florida) performs an admirable job in helping readers to understand the complicated and ambiguous issue of children's rights in the US. Documenting some of the most egregious examples of the abuse and neglect of children with stories both personal and universal, she leads readers down the historical trail of legislative and judicial decisions made on children's behalf, and suggests others ripe for the making. While the chapter narratives by themselves are engaging and highly readable, they fail to weave a convincing, integrative, rights-based thread through the text. Also missing is a sound argument as to why the US continues to be one of only two countries in the world not willing to sign on to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (the other being Somalia). Woodhouse does finish, however, with a coherent, psychosocially based vision for the future of children's rights as human rights, which she terms "ecogenerism." How much this new term becomes known and used will, in part, demonstrate the success of this important book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J.C. Altman Adelphi University
Reviews
Review Quotes
This book is timely. Hidden in Plain Sight: The Tragedy of Children's Rights . . . will serve as a guide for all professions involved with children. The author has provided a discussion of the elemental rights of children, using historical narratives to illustrate the presence and lack of rights afforded them. . . . It is an important book and hopefully will result in definitive guidelines that will include needs-based and capacity-based standards that the legal, economic, and psychosocial professions can apply in determining the best interests of children.
This is a substantive book from an academic perspective while maintaining a very readable dialogue. And for absolute certainty, wherever you stand or thought you stood on the issue of children's rights, once you have read this book, you will never look at a children's story the same again. -- Elizabeth Falter, Nursing Administration Quarterly
Winner of the 2009 APSA's Best Book Award, Human Rights Section
This is a wonderful book that essentially teaches us, through the eyes of a child, what it means to be an American--or at least what it should mean. Through profound and beautifully told stories of the experiences of youth, Professor Woodhouse provides new insight and 'a new conversation' about the misunderstood and improperly politicized concept of children's rights.
This moving and highly readable book reflects Woodhouse's long career as a distinguished family-law scholar and her deep reflection on the position of children in law and policy. She brings us riveting stories about famous people who, as children, have made significant contributions in areas such as gender equality and civil rights. Woodhouse presents us with the original and compelling argument that children should also have rights, not because they are potential adults, but because of the agency, courage, and vision they can and do exercise as children.
Woodhouse's superb, nuanced volume demonstrates the importance of treating children with dignity, shows the connection between children's needs and rights, and conveys how a developmentally based human rights framework can shape the balance between dependency and autonomy on the journey from childhood to adulthood.
Woodhouse is a wise person of experience whose voice is an important one, because of her good sense, her compassion, and her well-earned reputation in the field. She is also an excellent writer who brings the law alive through her stories, and talks about important legal issues in language that all can understand.
An intensely personal book, written with passion and conviction. Woodhouse does a highly effective job of conveying the importance of attending to children's voices and agency. This book is likely to attract public attention and spur public debate.
[Woodhouse] provides a narrative balanced with historical examples, including Anne Frank and the children of Dred Scott, as well as contemporary examples, like children of illegal immigrants, to explain the need for a defined structure of children's rights in the United States. Recognizing the ways that America has failed its children, Woodhouse advocates for a much-needed perspective and commitment when it comes to thinking about how we treat our country's most vulnerable youth. . . . As a founder and director of the Center on Children and Families at the University of Florida and the Chair in Family Law at the University of Florida Levin, Woodhouse is uniquely situated to write about advocating for children's rights. -- Erika Asgiersson, Campus Progress.com
[Woodhouse] provides a narrative balanced with historical examples, including Anne Frank and the children of Dred Scott, as well as contemporary examples, like children of illegal immigrants, to explain the need for a defined structure of children's rights in the United States. Recognizing the ways that America has failed its children, Woodhouse advocates for a much-needed perspective and commitment when it comes to thinking about how we treat our country's most vulnerable youth. . . . As a founder and director of the Center on Children and Families at the University of Florida and the Chair in Family Law at the University of Florida Levin, Woodhouse is uniquely situated to write about advocating for children's rights.
With this thoroughly annotated, well-written book, Woodhouse performs an admirable job in helping readers to understand the complicated and ambiguous issue of children's rights in the US. Documenting some of the most egregious examples of the abuse and neglect of children with stories both personal and universal, she leads readers down the historical trail of legislative and judicial decisions made on children's behalf, and suggests others ripe for the making. -- J. C. Altman, Choice
"This book is timely. Hidden in Plain Sight: The Tragedy of Children's Rights . . . will serve as a guide for all professions involved with children. The author has provided a discussion of the elemental rights of children, using historical narratives to illustrate the presence and lack of rights afforded them. . . . It is an important book and hopefully will result in definitive guidelines that will include needs-based and capacity-based standards that the legal, economic, and psychosocial professions can apply in determining the best interests of children."-- Viola Mecke, PsychCRITIQUES
This book is timely.Hidden in Plain Sight: The Tragedy of Children's Rights. . . will serve as a guide for all professions involved with children. The author has provided a discussion of the elemental rights of children, using historical narratives to illustrate the presence and lack of rights afforded them. . . . It is an important book and hopefully will result in definitive guidelines that will include needs-based and capacity-based standards that the legal, economic, and psychosocial professions can apply in determining the best interests of children.
With this thoroughly annotated, well-written book, Woodhouse performs an admirable job in helping readers to understand the complicated and ambiguous issue of children's rights in the US. Documenting some of the most egregious examples of the abuse and neglect of children with stories both personal and universal, she leads readers down the historical trail of legislative and judicial decisions made on children's behalf, and suggests others ripe for the making.
This book is timely. Hidden in Plain Sight: The Tragedy of Children's Rights . . . will serve as a guide for all professions involved with children. The author has provided a discussion of the elemental rights of children, using historical narratives to illustrate the presence and lack of rights afforded them. . . . It is an important book and hopefully will result in definitive guidelines that will include needs-based and capacity-based standards that the legal, economic, and psychosocial professions can apply in determining the best interests of children. -- Viola Mecke, PsychCRITIQUES
This book is timely.Hidden in Plain Sight: The Tragedy of Children's Rights. . . will serve as a guide for all professions involved with children. The author has provided a discussion of the elemental rights of children, using historical narratives to illustrate the presence and lack of rights afforded them. . . . It is an important book and hopefully will result in definitive guidelines that will include needs-based and capacity-based standards that the legal, economic, and psychosocial professions can apply in determining the best interests of children. -- Viola Mecke, PsychCRITIQUES
This is a substantive book from an academic perspective while maintaining a very readable dialogue. And for absolute certainty, wherever you stand or thought you stood on the issue of children's rights, once you have read this book, you will never look at a children's story the same again.
"This is a substantive book from an academic perspective while maintaining a very readable dialogue. And for absolute certainty, wherever you stand or thought you stood on the issue of children's rights, once you have read this book, you will never look at a children's story the same again."-- Elizabeth Falter, Nursing Administration Quarterly
"With this thoroughly annotated, well-written book, Woodhouse performs an admirable job in helping readers to understand the complicated and ambiguous issue of childrens rights in the US. Documenting some of the most egregious examples of the abuse and neglect of children with stories both personal and universal, she leads readers down the historical trail of legislative and judicial decisions made on childrens behalf, and suggests others ripe for the making."-- J. C. Altman, Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Tells the untold story of children's rights in America.
Back Cover Copy
"This moving and highly readable book reflects Woodhouse's long career as a distinguished family-law scholar and her deep reflection on the position of children in law and policy. She brings us riveting stories about famous people who, as children, have made significant contributions in areas such as gender equality and civil rights. Woodhouse presents us with the original and compelling argument that children should also have rights, not because they are potential adults, but because of the agency, courage, and vision they can and do exercise as children."--Martha Albertson Fineman, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of Law, Emory University "Woodhouse's superb, nuanced volume demonstrates the importance of treating children with dignity, shows the connection between children's needs and rights, and conveys how a developmentally based human rights framework can shape the balance between dependency and autonomy on the journey from childhood to adulthood."--Robert G. Schwartz, executive director of the Juvenile Law Center "This is a wonderful book that essentially teaches us, through the eyes of a child, what it means to be an American--or at least what it should mean. Through profound and beautifully told stories of the experiences of youth, Professor Woodhouse provides new insight and 'a new conversation' about the misunderstood and improperly politicized concept of children's rights."--Marvin Ventrell, president and CEO of the National Association of Counsel for Children "An intensely personal book, written with passion and conviction. Woodhouse does a highly effective job of conveying the importance of attending to children's voices and agency. This book is likely to attract public attention and spur public debate."--Steven Mintz, author of Huck's Raft: A History of American Childhood "Woodhouse is a wise person of experience whose voice is an important one, because of her good sense, her compassion, and her well-earned reputation in the field. She is also an excellent writer who brings the law alive through her stories, and talks about important legal issues in language that all can understand."--Elizabeth Bartholet, author of Nobody's Children and Family Bonds
Back Cover Copy
"This moving and highly readable book reflects Woodhouse's long career as a distinguished family-law scholar and her deep reflection on the position of children in law and policy. She brings us riveting stories about famous people who, as children, have made significant contributions in areas such as gender equality and civil rights. Woodhouse presents us with the original and compelling argument that children should also have rights, not because they are potential adults, but because of the agency, courage, and vision they can and do exercise as children."-- Martha Albertson Fineman, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of Law, Emory University "Woodhouse's superb, nuanced volume demonstrates the importance of treating children with dignity, shows the connection between children's needs and rights, and conveys how a developmentally based human rights framework can shape the balance between dependency and autonomy on the journey from childhood to adulthood."-- Robert G. Schwartz, executive director of the Juvenile Law Center "This is a wonderful book that essentially teaches us, through the eyes of a child, what it means to be an American--or at least what it should mean. Through profound and beautifully told stories of the experiences of youth, Professor Woodhouse provides new insight and 'a new conversation' about the misunderstood and improperly politicized concept of children's rights."-- Marvin Ventrell, president and CEO of the National Association of Counsel for Children "An intensely personal book, written with passion and conviction. Woodhouse does a highly effective job of conveying the importance of attending to children's voices and agency. This book is likely to attract public attention and spur public debate."-- Steven Mintz, author of Huck's Raft: A History of American Childhood "Woodhouse is a wise person of experience whose voice is an important one, because of her good sense, her compassion, and her well-earned reputation in the field. She is also an excellent writer who brings the law alive through her stories, and talks about important legal issues in language that all can understand."-- Elizabeth Bartholet, author of Nobody's Children and Family Bonds
Main Description
Hidden in Plain Sight tells the tragic untold story of children's rights in America. It asks why the United States today, alone among nations, rejects the most universally embraced human-rights document in history, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. This book is a call to arms for America to again be a leader in human rights, and to join the rest of the civilized world in recognizing that the thirst for justice is not for adults alone. Barbara Bennett Woodhouse explores the meaning of children's rights throughout American history, interweaving the childhood stories of iconic figures such as Benjamin Franklin with those of children less known but no less courageous, like the heroic youngsters who marched for civil rights. How did America become a place where twelve-year-old Lionel Tate could be sentenced to life in prison without parole for the 1999 death of a young playmate? In answering questions like this, Woodhouse challenges those who misguidedly believe that America's children already have more rights than they need, or that children's rights pose a threat to parental autonomy or family values. She reveals why fundamental human rights and principles of dignity, equality, privacy, protection, and voice are essential to a child's journey into adulthood, and why understanding rights for children leads to a better understanding of human rights for all. Compassionate, wise, and deeply moving, Hidden in Plain Sight will force an examination of our national resistance--and moral responsibility--to recognize children's rights.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Forewordp. xi
Prefacep. xv
Introduction: Ain't I a Person?p. 1
How to Think about Childhoodp. 15
How to Think about Children's Rightsp. 29
The Privacy Principle: Stories of Bondage and Belonging
Boys in Slavery and Servitude: Frederick Douglassp. 51
Girls at the Intersection of Age, Race, and Gender: Dred Scott's Daughtersp. 75
Growing Up in State Custody: "Tony" and "John G."p. 93
The Agency Principle: Stories of Voice and Participation
The Printer's Apprentice: Ben Franklin and Youth Speechp. 111
Youth in the Civil Rights Movement: John Lewis and Sheyann Webbp. 133
The Equality Principle: Stories of Equal Opportunity
Old Maids and Little Women: Louisa Alcott and William Catherp. 159
Breaking the Prison of Disability: Helen Keller and the Children of "Greenhaven"p. 180
The Dignity Principle: Stories of Resistance and Resilience
Hide and Survive: Anne Frank and "Liu"p. 213
Children at Work: Newsboys, Entrepreneurs, and "Evelyn"p. 234
The Protection Principle: Stories of Guilt and Innocence
Telling the Scariest Secrets: Maya Angelou and "Jeannie"p. 259
Age and the Idea of Innocence: "Amal" and Lionel Tatep. 279
Conclusion: The Future of Rightsp. 304
Notesp. 315
Bibliographyp. 337
Indexp. 349
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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