Catalogue


The travels of Marco Polo /
translated and with an introduction by Ronald Latham.
imprint
London : Penguin, 1958.
description
379 pages : maps, genealogical table ; 18 cm.
ISBN
0140440577
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
London : Penguin, 1958.
isbn
0140440577
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
6379068
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'The Travels' provides an account of Marco Polo's famous travels. In this translation, Ronald Latham examines Marco Polo's background to explain how he understood and classified the people, races, cultures and religions he saw in his voyages. This edition also contains an index and maps.
Description for Library
One of many editions of this account kept by Marco Polo of his travels in Asia in the 13th century.
Main Description
Marco Polo was the most famous traveller of his time. His voyages began in 1271 with a visit to China, after which he served the Kubilai Khan on numerous diplomatic missions. On his return to the West he was made a prisoner of war and met Rustichello of Pisa, with whom he collaborated on this book. The accounts of his travels provide a fascinating glimpse of the different societies he encountered: of their religions, customs, ceremonies and way of life; of the spices and silks of the East; of precious gems, exotic vegetation and wild beasts. He tells the story of the holy shoemaker, the wicked caliph and the three kings, among a great many others, evoking a remote and fascinating world with colour and immediacy.
Main Description
Marco Polo was the most famous traveller of his time. His voyages began in 1271 with a visit to China, after which he served the Kubilai Khan on numerous diplomatic missions. On his return to the West he was made a prisoner of war and met Rustichello of Pisa, with whom he collaborated on this book. The accounts of his travels provide a fascinating glimpse of the different societies he encountered: their religions, customs, ceremonies and way of life; on the spices and silks of the East; on precious gems, exotic vegetation and wild beasts. He tells the story of the holy shoemaker, the wicked caliph and the three kings, among a great many others, evoking a remote and long-vanished world with colour and immediacy.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 7
Prologue (1-19)p. 33
The Middle East (20-43)p. 46
The Road to Cathay (44-75)p. 74
Kubilai Khan (76-105)p. 113
From Peking to Bengal (106-131)p. 163
From Peking to Amoy (132-158)p. 194
From China to India (159-174)p. 241
India (175-189)p. 260
The Arabian Sea (190-199)p. 295
Northern Regions and Tartar Wars (200-234)p. 313
Epiloguep. 344
Genealogical Table of Mongol Imperial Housep. 347
Mapsp. 348
Indexp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem