Catalogue

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Trauma and transformation : the political progress of John Bunyan /
edited by Vera J. Camden.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2008.
description
xii, 185 p.
ISBN
0804757852 (alk. paper), 9780804757850 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2008.
isbn
0804757852 (alk. paper)
9780804757850 (alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : the political progress of John Bunyan / by Vera J. Camden -- Dissociation and decapitation / Peter L. Rudnytsky -- A response to Peter Rudnytsky / by David Norbrook -- Young man Bunyan / by Vera J. Camden -- Bunyan's women, women's Bunyan / by Margaret J.M. Ezell -- One soul versus one flesh : friendship, marriage, and the Puritan self / by Thomas M. Luxon -- Bunyan's bawdy : sex and sexual wordplay in the writings of John Bunyan / by Michael Davies -- Bunyan and the antinomians / by Roger Pooley -- John Bunyan and the politics of remembrance / by Sharon Achinstein.
general note
Includes essays originally delivered at the Third Triennial Conference of the International John Bunyan Society held in October, 2001, in Cleveland and Kent, Ohio.
catalogue key
6377510
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-08-01:
This volume collects nine solid essays emanating from the 2001 conference of the John Bunyan Society. Camden (Kent State Univ.) opens the book with an uncommonly useful introduction. The first two chapters will be of particular interest to students of the period. In the first, Peter Rudnytsky presents a Freudian defense and restatement of Eliot's notion of a 17th-century dissociation of sensibility, and David Norbrook follows with a critical but not ungenerous response to Rudnytsky. As often happens when experts speak to fellow experts, the best things here are the most surprising--the ones that go against received judgments. Several essays investigate just how consistent a radical Bunyan really was: as Camden notes, his "career is compulsive, creative, and at times quite conservative in relation to the pressing causes of his day." The real gem of a surprise comes in Michael Davies' essay "Bunyan's Bawdy," which demonstrates the abundance and pertinence of what Davies calls Bunyan's "creative onanism"--his rich apparatus of sexual wordplay. Who knew? Davies' contribution merits wide readership; it will be useful to anyone interested in 17th-century studies--history and theology as well as English literature. Summing Up: Recommended. Ambitious upper-division undergraduates through faculty. E. D. Hill Mount Holyoke College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"For the student of seventeenth-century English literature, history, and theology this collection amply repays careful reading. Seven years after the events that prevented many scholars of the early modern period from attending the Third Bunyan Conference, each of these essays is surprising, thought-provoking, eloquent, and elegantly argued." --Nancy Rosenfeld, University of Haifa, Max Stern College of Jezreel Valley, Israel
"Stimulating collection .... A team of distinguished scholars has produced a lively volume, and the Bunyans that they've sent forth, or let loose, will assuredly be accorded interested reception by early modernists."--David Parnham, Church History.
"Stimulating collection .... A team of distinguished scholars has produced a lively volume, and the Bunyans that they've sent forth, or let loose, will assuredly be accorded interested reception by early modernists."--David Parnham,Church History.
"The real gem of a surprise comes in Michael Davies' essay 'Bunyan's Bawdy,' which demonstrates the abundance and pertinence of what Davies calls Bunyan's 'creative onanism'his rich apparatus of sexual wordplay. Who knew? Davies' contribution merits wid
"The real gem of a surprise comes in Michael Davies' essay 'Bunyan's Bawdy,' which demonstrates the abundance and pertinence of what Davies calls Bunyan's 'creative onanism'--his rich apparatus of sexual wordplay. Who knew? Davies' contribution merits wide readership; it will be useful to anyone interested in 17th-centruy studies--history and theology as well as English literature." -- CHOICE
"The real gem of a surprise comes in Michael Davies' essay 'Bunyan's Bawdy,' which demonstrates the abundance and pertinence of what Davies calls Bunyan's 'creative onanism'--his rich apparatus of sexual wordplay. Who knew? Davies' contribution merits wide readership; it will be useful to anyone interested in 17th-centruy studies--history and theology as well as English literature." --CHOICE
"This is an exciting collection of interventionist essays that are appearing at just the right time. They are unexpected, deeply civilized, historically accurate, and a joy to read." Nigel Smith, Princeton University
"This is an exciting collection of interventionist essays that are appearing at just the right time. They are unexpected, deeply civilized, historically accurate, and a joy to read." --Nigel Smith, Princeton University
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2008
Choice, August 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
In 1649, the English people suffered a tremendous wound, a psychic lesion, as they both instigated and endured the killing of their king. John Bunyan came of age in the shadow of this rupture in the political, social, and religious order of the nation; his life and works follow the contours of the Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution. Yet when compared with such contemporaries as John Milton, Andrew Marvell, or Samuel Pepys, Bunyan is strikingly silent about the political events of those tumultuous years. In his single-minded spirituality, Bunyan endures as an intriguing figure, but his conflicted political legacy remains subject to dispute. "Trauma and Transformation" brings together eight leading early modern scholars who radically reassess the crises of authority, agency, and sexuality that have surrounded John Bunyan since he first began to preach and to write. In his anguished, self-conscious pursuit of salvation, Bunyan augurs the dilemmas of modernity. At the same time, he vigorously espouses dissent and liberty. The essays of this collection examine the societal and psychological fault lines in the early modern culture that Bunyan himself epitomizes.
Main Description
In 1649, the English people suffered a tremendous wound, a psychic lesion, as they both instigated and endured the killing of their king. John Bunyan came of age in the shadow of this rupture in the political, social, and religious order of the nation; his life and works follow the contours of the Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution. Yet when compared with such contemporaries as John Milton, Andrew Marvell, or Samuel Pepys, Bunyan is strikingly silent about the political events of those tumultuous years. In his single-minded spirituality, Bunyan endures as an intriguing figure, but his conflicted political legacy remains subject to dispute. Trauma and Transformationbrings together eight leading early modern scholars who radically reassess the crises of authority, agency, and sexuality that have surrounded John Bunyan since he first began to preach and to write. In his anguished, self-conscious pursuit of salvation, Bunyan augurs the dilemmas of modernity. At the same time, he vigorously espouses dissent and liberty. The essays of this collection examine the societal and psychological fault lines in the early modern culture that Bunyan himself epitomizes.
Main Description
In 1649, the English people suffered a tremendous wound, a psychic lesion, as they both instigated and endured the killing of their king. John Bunyan came of age in the shadow of this rupture in the political, social, and religious order of the nation; his life and works follow the contours of the Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution. Yet when compared with such contemporaries as John Milton, Andrew Marvell, or Samuel Pepys, Bunyan is strikingly silent about the political events of those tumultuous years. In his single-minded spirituality, Bunyan endures as an intriguing figure, but his conflicted political legacy remains subject to dispute.Trauma and Transformationbrings together eight leading early modern scholars who radically reassess the crises of authority, agency, and sexuality that have surrounded John Bunyan since he first began to preach and to write. In his anguished, self-conscious pursuit of salvation, Bunyan augurs the dilemmas of modernity. At the same time, he vigorously espouses dissent and liberty. The essays of this collection examine the societal and psychological fault lines in the early modern culture that Bunyan himself epitomizes.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Contributorsp. xi
Introduction: The Political Progress of John Bunyanp. 1
Dissociation and Decapitationp. 14
A Response to Peter Rudnytskyp. 36
Young Man Bunyanp. 41
Bunyan's Women, Women's Bunyanp. 63
One Soul Versus One Flesh: Friendship, Marriage, and the Puritan Selfp. 81
Bunyan's Bawdy: Sex and Sexual Wordplay in the Writings of John Bunyanp. 100
Bunyan and the Antinomiansp. 120
John Bunyan and the Politics of Remembrancep. 135
Notesp. 153
Indexp. 177
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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