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Joseph Andrews ; and, Shamela /
Henry Fielding ; edited with an introduction and notes by Judith Hawley.
imprint
London ; New York : Penguin Books, 1999.
description
xxxix, 389 p. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0140433864
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
London ; New York : Penguin Books, 1999.
isbn
0140433864
catalogue key
6374858
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. xxxv-xxxvii).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Henry Fielding (1707-54) turned to novel-writing when his outspoken satirical plays so annoyed Walpole's Government that a new Licensing Act was introduced to drive him from the stage.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Hawley's introduction is a model of what such a thing should be (for an undergraduate audience): full of information, but not too pushy. She manages to touch on a truly remarkable number of important bases in just a few pages--an impressive accomplishment. The notes are good, too. This is the best edition out there for college students."
"Hawley's introduction is a model of what such a thing should be (for an undergraduate audience): full of information, but not too pushy. She manages to touch on a truly remarkable number of important bases in just a few pages-an impressive accomplishment. The notes are good, too. This is the best edition out there for college students."
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Begun as a parody of Richardson's moralistic and sentimental novel Pamela, Joseph Andrews grew under Fielding's hand into a satirical fiction in its own right. In the story, the virtuous hero is overshadowed by the rumbustious figure of Parson Adams.
Main Description
Henry Fielding wrote both Joseph Andrews (1742) and Shamela (1741) in response to Samuel Richardson's book Pamela (1740), of which Shamela is a splendidly bawdy travesty. Joseph Andrews begins as a parody, too, but soon outgrows its origins, and its deepest roots lie in Cervantes and Marivaux. In both stories, Fielding demonstrates his concern for the corruption of contemporary society, politics, religion, morality, and taste. This revised and expanded edition follows the text of Joseph Andrews established by Martin C. Battestin for the definitive Wesleyan Edition of Fielding's works. The text of Shamela is based on the first edition, and two substantial appendices reprint the preliminary matter from the second edition of Richardson's Pamela and Conyers Middleton's Life of Cicero, which is also closely parodied in Shamela. This Oxford World's Classics edition also features a new introduction by Thomas Keymer which situates Fielding's works in their critical and historical contexts.
Main Description
'Kissing, Joseph, is but a Prologue to a Play. Can I believe a young Fellow of your Age and Complexion will be content with Kissing?'Joseph Andrews, Henry Fielding's first full-length novel, depicts the many colourful and often hilarious adventures of a comically chaste servant. After being sacked for spurning the lascivious Lady Booby, Joseph takes the road, accompanied by his beloved Fanny Goodwill, a much-put-upon foundling girl, and Parson Adams, a man often duped and humiliated, but still a model of Christian charity. In the boisterous short tale Shamela, a brilliant parody of Richardson's Pamela, the spirited and sexually honest heroine uses coyness and mock modesty to catch herself a rich husband. Together these works anticipate Fielding's great comic epic Tom Jones, with their amiable good humour and pointed social satire.
Main Description
'Kissing, Joseph, is but a Prologue to a Play. Can I believe a young Fellow of your Age and Complexion will be content with Kissing?' Joseph Andrews , Henry Fielding's first full-length novel, depicts the many colourful and often hilarious adventures of a comically chaste servant. After being sacked for spurning the lascivious Lady Booby, Joseph takes to the road, accompanied by his beloved Fanny Goodwill, a much-put-upon foundling girl, and Parson Adams, a man often duped and humiliated, but still a model of Christian charity. In the boisterous short tale Shamela , a brilliant parody of Richardson's Pamela , the spirited and sexually honest heroine uses coyness and mock modesty to catch herself a rich husband. Together these works anticipate Fielding's great comic epic Tom Jones , with their amiable good humour and pointed social satire. Judith Hawley's introduction compares the works of Fielding and Richardson, and discusses sex and class relations, and the literary and political world of the time. This volume also includes a chronology and suggestions for further reading.
Main Description
SHAMELA is a brilliant parody of Samuel Richardson's PAMELA, in which a virtuous servant girl long resists her master's advances and is eventually 'rewarded' with marriage. Fielding's far more spirited and sexually honest heroine, by contrast, merely uses coyness and mock modesty as techniques to catch a rich husband. JOSEPH ANDREWS, Fielding's first full-length novel, can also be seen as a response to Richardson, as the lascivious Lady Booby sets out to seduce her comically chaste servant Joseph, (himself in love with the much-put-upon Fanny Goodwill). As in Tom Jones, Fielding takes a huge cast of characters out on the road and exposes them to many colourful and often hilarious adventures.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vi
Introductionp. vii
Chronologyp. xxx
Suggestions for Further Readingp. xxxiv
Note on the Textsp. xxxvii
Shamelap. 1
Joseph Andrewsp. 45
Notesp. 335
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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