Catalogue


Politics and society in ancient Greece /
Nicholas F. Jones.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2008.
description
xii, 167 p.
ISBN
0275987655 (alk. paper), 9780275987657 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2008.
isbn
0275987655 (alk. paper)
9780275987657 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6371937
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-02-01:
Jones (Univ. of Pittsburgh) argues that one of the main political forces in the Greek city-state was image making. Politicians acquired nicknames like the "Just" or boasted of special connections with the gods because they wished to impress the populace. In Athens, politicians from all parties used such ploys, but the aristocrats eventually found it difficult to compete with their rivals in the public relations game. They thus formed political associations to control voters by distributing ballots or other such methods, but when these legitimate techniques failed, they resorted to violence and intimidation. The author's suggestion that Solon's complicated legislation was aimed at accommodating arrivistes is intriguing. Jones's discussions of political institutions and society in the context of over 20 brief biographies of "conservatives" and "liberals" are useful. His view that women played an important role in society is persuasive, and contrary to prevailing opinion. Strong female characters on the Athenian stage and the important role of certain priestesses reveal the significance of females in the public sphere. Jones is an insightful scholar. This thoughtful and lucid book should be of great use as a supplemental text in undergraduate Greek history courses. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. A. J. Papalas East Carolina University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Jones is an insightful scholar. This thoughtful and lucid book should be of great use as a supplemental text in undergraduate Greek history courses. . . . Highly recommended. All levels/libraries." - Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2009
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Examining politics as social history in public & private life, this book explores how democracies in Ancient Greece encouraged the participation of all sections of society through social clubs, religious ceremonies, patronage, art and even athletics.
Long Description
Western democracies often trace their political roots back to Ancient Greece. While politics today may seem the dusty domain of lawmakers and pundits, in the classical era virtually no aspect of life was beyond its reach. "Political life" was not limited to acts of a legislature, magistrates, and the courts but routinely included the activities of social clubs, the patronage system, and expression through literature, art, and architecture. Through these varied means, even non-enfranchised groups (such as women and non-citizens) gained entry into a wider democratic process. Beyond the citizen world of "traditional" politics, there existed multiple layers of Greek political life-reflecting many aspects of our own modern political landscape. Religious cults served as venues for female office-holders; private clubs and drinking parties served significant social functions. Popular athletes capitalized on their fame to run for elected office. Military veterans struggled to bring back the "good old days" much to the dismay of the forward-thinking ambitions of naive twenty-somethings. Liberals and conservatives of all classes battled over important issues of the day. Scandal and intrigue made or ended many a political career. Taken collectively, these aspects of political life serve as a lens for viewing the whole of Greek civilization in some of its characteristic and distinctive dimensions.
Main Description
Western democracies often trace their political roots back to Ancient Greece. While politics today may seem the dusty domain of lawmakers and pundits, in the classical era virtually no aspect of life was beyond its reach. "Political life" was not limited to acts of a legislature, magistrates, and the courts but routinely included the activities of social clubs, the patronage system, and expression through literature, art, and architecture. Through these varied means, even non-enfranchised groups (such as women and non-citizens) gained entry into a wider democratic process.
Long Description
Western democracies often trace their political roots back to Ancient Greece. While politics today may seem the dusty domain of lawmakers and pundits, in the classical era virtually no aspect of life was beyond its reach. Political life was not limited to acts of a legislature, magistrates, and the courts but routinely included the activities of social clubs, the patronage system, and expression through literature, art, and architecture. Through these varied means, even non-enfranchised groups (such as women and non-citizens) gained entry into a wider democratic process. Beyond the citizen world of traditional politics, there existed multiple layers of Greek political life-reflecting many aspects of our own modern political landscape. Religious cults served as venues for female office-holders; private clubs and drinking parties served significant social functions. Popular athletes capitalized on their fame to run for elected office. Military veterans struggled to bring back the good old days much to the dismay of the forward-thinking ambitions of naive twenty-somethings. Liberals and conservatives of all classes battled over important issues of the day. Scandal and intrigue made or ended many a political career. Taken collectively, these aspects of political life serve as a lens for viewing the whole of Greek civilization in some of its characteristic and distinctive dimensions.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Politics and Society in Ancient Greecep. 1
Politics and the Constitutionp. 20
Spartap. 39
Conflict, Trials, and Ostracismp. 55
The World of Menp. 74
The World of Womenp. 92
Some Ancient Greek Politiciansp. 109
Some More Ancient Greek Politiciansp. 130
Texts, Visuals, and Web Sitesp. 149
Notesp. 155
Further Readingsp. 159
Indexp. 163
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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