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An accidental journalist : the adventures of Edmund Stevens, 1934-1945 /
Cheryl Heckler.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2007.
description
xi, 290 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0826217702 (alk. paper), 9780826217707 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
personal subject
More Details
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2007.
isbn
0826217702 (alk. paper)
9780826217707 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6363255
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 281-283) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-06-01:
An idealistic American Communist who became disenchanted while living in the Soviet Union, Stevens (1910-92) turned to journalism and devoted a significant part of his life and energy--not to mention his skills of observation, reporting, and analysis--to that career. Known for his ability to grasp the significance of unfolding events, he shared his insights on communism's social, political, and military conflicts with American readers. Stevens ultimately became the longest-serving US foreign correspondent, mostly with the Christian Science Monitor (he also wrote for various popular magazines), reporting from the Soviet Union. In 1950 he won a Pulitzer for his 43-article series "This Is Russia Uncensored." In telling Stevens's story, Heckler interweaves the retrospective, first-person voice of the memoirist with historical data, balancing Stevens's contemporary writing (including letters to his mother) and illuminating it further with excerpts from the memoirs of Stevens's wife. In an appendix, he includes a collection of published news articles by Stevens. This book is a valuable companion to Michael Emery's On the Front Lines: Following America's Foreign Correspondents across the Twentieth Century (CH, Mar'96, 33-3725). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals. L. Loomis SUNY Oswego
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Reference & Research Book News, February 2008
Choice, June 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Cheryl Heckler traces the career of Edmund Stevens, the longest-serving American-born journalist working from within the Soviet Union, a career that spanned half a century and four continents. The text focuses on Stevens' professional work and life from 1934 to 1945.
Library of Congress Summary
"Stevens was the longest-serving American-born correspondent working from within the Soviet Union. In his career, which spanned half a century, he distinguished himself as a war reporter, analyst, and cultural interpreter. Heckler focuses on Stevens's work, especially his reporting for the Christian Science Monitor, and his life from 1934 to 1945"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Idealistic American Edmund Stevens arrived in Moscow in 1934 to do his part for the advancement of international Communism. His job writing propaganda led to an accidental career in journalism and an eventual Pulitzer Prize in 1950 for his uncensored descriptions of Stalin's purges. The longest-serving American-born correspondent working from within the Soviet Union, Stevens began his journalism career reporting on the Russo-Finnish War in 1939 and was theChristian Science Monitor's first man in the field to cover fighting in World War II. He reported on the Italian invasion of Greece, participated in Churchill's Moscow meeting with Stalin as a staff translator, and distinguished himself as a correspondent with the British army in North Africa. Drawing on Stevens's memoirs as well as his articles and correspondence, Heckler sheds new light on both the public and the private Stevens, portraying a reporter adapting to new roles and circumstances with a skill that journalists today could well emulate.
Main Description
When an idealistic American named Edmund Stevens arrived in Moscow in 1934, his only goal was to do his part for the advancement of international Communism. His job writing propaganda led to a reporting career and an eventual Pulitzer Prize in 1950 for his uncensored descriptions of Stalin's purges. This book tells how Stevens became an accidental journalist-and the dean of the Moscow press corps. The longest-serving American-born correspondent working from within the Soviet Union, Stevens was passionate about influencing the way his stateside readers thought about Russia's citizens, government, and social policy. Cheryl Heckler now traces a career that spanned half a century and four continents, focusing on Stevens's professional work and life from 1934 to 1945 to tell how he set the standards for reporting on Soviet affairs for the Christian Science Monitor. Stevens was a keen observer and thoughtful commentator, and his analytical mind was just what the Monitorwas looking for in a foreign correspondent. He began his journalism career reporting on the Russo-Finnish War in 1939 and was the Monitor's first man in the field to cover fighting in World War II. He reported on the Italian invasion of Greece, participated in Churchill's Moscow meeting with Stalin as a staff translator, and distinguished himself as a correspondent with the British army in North Africa. Drawing on Stevens's memoirs-to which she had exclusive access-as well as his articles and correspondence and the unpublished memoirs of his wife, Nina, Heckler traces his growth as a frontline correspondent and interpreter of Russian culture. She paints a picture of a man hardened by experience, who witnessed the brutal crushing of the Iron Guard in 1941 Bucharest and the Kharkov hangings yet who was a failure on his own home front and who left his wife during a difficult pregnancy in order to return to the war zone. Heckler places his memoirs and dispatches within the larger context of events to shed new light on both the public and the private Stevens, portraying a reporter adapting to new roles and circumstances with a skill that journalists today could well emulate. By exposing the many facets of Stevens's life and experience, Heckler gives readers a clear understanding of how this accidental journalist was destined to distinguish himself as a war reporter, analyst, and cultural interpreter. An Accidental Journalistis an important contribution to the history of war reporting and international journalism, introducing readers to a man whose inside knowledge of Stalinist Russia was beyond compare as it provides new insight into the Soviet era.
Main Description
When an idealistic American named Edmund Stevens arrived in Moscow in 1934, his only goal was to do his part for the advancement of international Communism. His job writing propaganda led to a reporting career and an eventual Pulitzer Prize in 1950 for his uncensored descriptions of Stalin’s purges. This book tells how Stevens became an accidental journalist-and the dean of the Moscow press corps. The longest-serving American-born correspondent working from within the Soviet Union, Stevens was passionate about influencing the way his stateside readers thought about Russia’s citizens, government, and social policy. Cheryl Heckler now traces a career that spanned half a century and four continents, focusing on Stevens’s professional work and life from 1934 to 1945 to tell how he set the standards for reporting on Soviet affairs for the Christian Science Monitor. Stevens was a keen observer and thoughtful commentator, and his analytical mind was just what the Monitorwas looking for in a foreign correspondent. He began his journalism career reporting on the Russo-Finnish War in 1939 and was the Monitor’s first man in the field to cover fighting in World War II. He reported on the Italian invasion of Greece, participated in Churchill’s Moscow meeting with Stalin as a staff translator, and distinguished himself as a correspondent with the British army in North Africa. Drawing on Stevens’s memoirs-to which she had exclusive access-as well as his articles and correspondence and the unpublished memoirs of his wife, Nina, Heckler traces his growth as a frontline correspondent and interpreter of Russian culture. She paints a picture of a man hardened by experience, who witnessed the brutal crushing of the Iron Guard in 1941 Bucharest and the Kharkov hangings yet who was a failure on his own home front and who left his wife during a difficult pregnancy in order to return to the war zone. Heckler places his memoirs and dispatches within the larger context of events to shed new light on both the public and the private Stevens, portraying a reporter adapting to new roles and circumstances with a skill that journalists today could well emulate. By exposing the many facets of Stevens’s life and experience, Heckler gives readers a clear understanding of how this accidental journalist was destined to distinguish himself as a war reporter, analyst, and cultural interpreter. An Accidental Journalistis an important contribution to the history of war reporting and international journalism, introducing readers to a man whose inside knowledge of Stalinist Russia was beyond compare as it provides new insight into the Soviet era.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: An Accidental Journalistp. 1
An American in Russia
The Early Years in Moscowp. 29
Kirov's Death and the Purgep. 45
Covering World War II
Russia and Germany against the Baltics, Norway, and Finlandp. 67
Italo-Greek Warp. 97
Ethiopia with Selassie and Wingatep. 137
Desert War of 1942p. 163
With Churchill in Moscowp. 193
Wendell L. Willkie, Iraq, Iran, Victory in North Africap. 211
A Moscow Correspondent Once Againp. 231
An Inevitable Journalist: Samples of Stevens's Reportingp. 257
Bibliographyp. 281
Indexp. 285
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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