Catalogue


Building after Katrina : visions for the Gulf Coast /
edited by Betsy Roettger.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Charlottesville, VA : University of Virginia School of Architecture, c2007.
description
160 p. : col. ill. ; 31 cm.
ISBN
0977102459 (pbk.), 9780977102457 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
series title
imprint
Charlottesville, VA : University of Virginia School of Architecture, c2007.
isbn
0977102459 (pbk.)
9780977102457 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6356701
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
After the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the fall of 2005, entire towns, neighborhoods, and ecologies were destroyed. What remains is a complex web of social, economic, environmental, and cultural issues that demand new strategies for inhabiting this land. During the spring semester of 2006, the University of Virginia School of Architecture incorporated these issues into the research and studio work of faculty and students, as well as undertaking hands-on projects in Louisiana and Mississippi. "Building After Katrina" is the result of that intense focus on a set of design problems. In this vibrant collection, leading architects and theorists such as William Moorish, Robin Dripps, and Peter Waldman, among others, present innovative strategies developed with their students for rebuilding Gulf Coast communities. While it is a critical time for the future of the area that inspired this work, the work itself is deliberately applicable to global design problems: How does one design an intervention for a specific culture, ecology, and time? How do we respond to both disaster relief and long-term restoration? How does the design profession advance work at the intersection of architecture, landscape, planning, and preservation? How do we propose designs that improve the environmental underpinnings of a place while serving the diverse cultures that shape public space? And how can the role of the design professional become an essential voice in shaping policies that affect our physical and cultural landscape? "Building After Katrina" defines these questions broadly and offers -- in a large-format, full-color book complete with numerous drawings and photographs -- a setof fresh approaches that will challenge architects, planners, policy makers, and citizens alike.Distributed for the University of Virginia School of Architecture
Main Description
After the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the fall of 2005, entire towns, neighborhoods, and ecologies were destroyed. What remains is a complex web of social, economic, environmental, and cultural issues that demand new strategies for inhabiting this land.During the spring semester of 2006, the University of Virginia School of Architecture incorporated these issues into the research and studio work of faculty and students, as well as undertaking hands-on projects in Louisiana and Mississippi. Building After Katrina is the result of that intense focus on a set of design problems. In this vibrant collection, leading architects and theorists such as William Moorish, Robin Dripps, and Peter Waldman, among others, present innovative strategies developed with their students for rebuilding Gulf Coast communities. While it is a critical time for the future of the area that inspired this work, the work itself is deliberately applicable to global design problems: How does one design an intervention for a specific culture, ecology, and time? How do we respond to both disaster relief and long-term restoration? How does the design profession advance work at the intersection of architecture, landscape, planning, and preservation? How do we propose designs that improve the environmental underpinnings of a place while serving the diverse cultures that shape public space? And how can the role of the design professional become an essential voice in shaping policies that affect our physical and cultural landscape?Building After Katrina defines these questions broadly and offers -- in a large-format, full-color book complete with numerous drawings and photographs -- a set of fresh approaches that will challenge architects, planners, policy makers, and citizens alike.Distributed for the University of Virginia School of Architecture
Main Description
After the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the fall of 2005, entire towns, neighborhoods, and ecologies were destroyed. What remains is a complex web of social, economic, environmental, and cultural issues that demand new strategies for inhabiting this land. During the spring semester of 2006, the University of Virginia School of Architecture incorporated these issues into the research and studio work of faculty and students, as well as undertaking hands-on projects in Louisiana and Mississippi. Building After Katrina is the result of that intense focus on a set of design problems. In this vibrant collection, leading architects and theorists such as William Moorish, Robin Dripps, and Peter Waldman, among others, present innovative strategies developed with their students for rebuilding Gulf Coast communities. While it is a critical time for the future of the area that inspired this work, the work itself is deliberately applicable to global design problems: How does one design an intervention for a specific culture, ecology, and time? How do we respond to both disaster relief and long-term restoration? How does the design profession advance work at the intersection of architecture, landscape, planning, and preservation? How do we propose designs that improve the environmental underpinnings of a place while serving the diverse cultures that shape public space? And how can the role of the design professional become an essential voice in shaping policies that affect our physical and cultural landscape? Building After Katrina defines these questions broadly and offers -- in a large-format, full-color book complete with numerous drawings and photographs -- a set of fresh approaches that will challenge architects, planners, policy makers, and citizens alike. Distributed for the University of Virginia School of Architecture
Table of Contents
Preface: "The Architecture of Urgent Matters"
Making the Invisible Visible
Observations from the first student service-learning trip
Refloat NOLA: "What's in the Cards for Rebuilding New Orleans Infrastructure"
Essay, plus seminar work done by an interdisciplinary team of graduate students
Urban Landscape Infrastructure for the Broadmoor Neighborhood
Studio work by 2nd and 3rd year architecture and landscape architecture graduate students
A Big Picture High School for Broadmoor
Studio work by 3rd year architecture undergraduate students
Rebuilding Community on the London Avenue Canal
Studio work by 3rd year architecture undergraduate students
Mat & Canopy: Opportunities
Studio work by 3rd year architecture undergraduate students
Noah's ARC: New Orleans Alternative High*School as Reconstructed Community
Studio work by 3rd year architecture undergraduate students
Building Matters
Required technical course work by 3rd year architecture undergraduate students
Seeking Higher Density on Higher Ground
Studio work by 2nd an 3rd year architecture graduate students
Ground Rules: Living Above the Street
Work from two recent competition entries
ecoMOD2: the preHAB House
Design/ build work by 4th year architecture undergraduates, landscape architecture graduate students, architecture graduate students, and engineering students
Two Public Art Projects
Angie Ferraro and Henry Randolph, 4th year architecture student and liberal arts, English major
Postscript
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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