Catalogue


Lincoln and freedom : slavery, emancipation, and the Thirteenth Amendment /
edited by Harold Holzer and Sara Vaughn Gabbard.
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2007.
description
viii, 271 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0809327643 (alk. paper), 9780809327645 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Carbondale : Southern Illinois University Press, c2007.
isbn
0809327643 (alk. paper)
9780809327645 (alk. paper)
contents note
Foreword / Joan L. Flinspach -- Introduction / Harold Holzer -- Slavery during Lincoln's lifetime / James Oliver Horton -- Lincoln's critique of Dred Scott as a vindication of the Founding / Joseph R. Fornieri -- Lincoln and the limits of constitutional authority / Phillip Shaw Paludan -- Lincoln, God, and freedom : a promise fulfilled / Lucas E. Morel -- "Sublime in its magnitude" : the Emancipation Proclamation / Allen C. Guelzo -- Lincoln's summer of emancipation / Matthew Pinsker -- The role of the press / Hans L. Trefousse -- Marching to freedom : the U.S. Colored Troops / John F. Marszalek -- Lincoln and the rhetoric of freedom / Ronald C. White Jr. -- Ballots over bullets : freedom and the 1864 election / David E. Long -- The Constitution, the amendment process, and the abolition of slavery / Herman Belz -- The Thirteenth Amendment enacted / Michael Vorenberg -- "That which Congress so nobly began" : the men who passed the Thirteenth Amendment resolution / Ron J. Keller -- The end of the beginning : Abraham Lincoln and the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments / Frank J. Williams -- Picturing freedom : the Thirteenth Amendment in the graphic arts / Harold Holzer.
general note
"Published in conjunction with the Lincoln Museum, Fort Wayne, Indiana."
catalogue key
6356588
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-07-01:
Abraham Lincoln is the paragon of complexity. He made very public policy decisions, but he kept his reasoning for them virtually hidden. In exploring Lincoln's private motivations, editors Holzer and Gabbard in their essay collection and author Carnahan in his monograph reflect the duality of Lincoln's approach to the issue of slavery, emancipation, and freedom. The Holzer/Gabbard book, by virtue of its contributed essays format, takes a broad approach to Lincoln's position relative to the redefinition of freedom in the US. Some essays, like James Horton's discussion of slavery in the early 19th century, are traditional historical investigations. Others, such as Ronald White's discussion of Lincoln's use of rhetoric, delve into the more esoteric use of language as symbol of intent. Well-known historians author all of the essays, and the result is a comprehensive, multifaceted discussion of the diverse debate on the Civil War's meaning of freedom. Carnahan (law, George Washington Univ.) takes a much different approach, concentrating his discussion on Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation instead of a broader theme. More precisely, Carnahan dissects the proclamation as a legal proceeding, exploring Lincoln's perceptions of what the law did and did not permit him to do as commander in chief in time of war. Carnahan reinforces the idea that Lincoln was bound by the Constitution and the legal demands of due process, and the emancipation of the slaves depended as much upon what the law permitted Lincoln to do as what he wished to do. The result is a clear legal analysis of a president dealing with a shifting political and military landscape, achieving what he could within the bounds of his situation. Together, these books provide a comprehensive view of both the emotional and legal facets of a private president and a public triumph. Summing Up: Recommended (both books). Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. J. Ramold Eastern Michigan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Lincoln and Freedomprovides abundant useful information, much of it new, on Abraham Lincoln, slavery, emancipation and the Thirteenth Amendment. Moreover, the authors deal with their subjects through a variety of approaches and interpretive lenses, thereby furnishing readers with several perspectives on these important subjects."Richard W. Etulain, author ofBeyondthe Missouri: The Story of the American West
" "Lincoln and Freedom" provides abundant useful information, much of it new, on Abraham Lincoln, slavery, emancipation and the Thirteenth Amendment. Moreover, the authors deal with their subjects through a variety of approaches and interpretive lenses, thereby furnishing readers with several perspectives on these important subjects." -- Richard W. Etulain, author of "Beyond"" ""the Missouri: The Story of the American West"
" Lincoln and Freedom provides abundant useful information, much of it new, on Abraham Lincoln, slavery, emancipation and the Thirteenth Amendment.& Moreover, the authors deal with their subjects through a variety of approaches and interpretive lenses, thereby furnishing readers with several perspectives on these important subjects. " -- Richard W. Etulain, author of Beyond the Missouri: The Story of the American West
""Lincoln and Freedom" provides abundant useful information, much of it new, on Abraham Lincoln, slavery, emancipation and the Thirteenth Amendment. Moreover, the authors deal with their subjects through a variety of approaches and interpretive lenses, thereby furnishing readers with several perspectives on these important subjects."--Richard W. Etulain, author of "Beyond"" ""the Missouri: The Story of the American West"
" Lincoln and Freedom provides abundant useful information, much of it new, on Abraham Lincoln, slavery, emancipation and the Thirteenth Amendment. Moreover, the authors deal with their subjects through a variety of approaches and interpretive lenses, thereby furnishing readers with several perspectives on these important subjects." Richard W. Etulain , author of Beyond the Missouri: The Story of the American West
" Lincoln and Freedom provides abundant useful information, much of it new, on Abraham Lincoln, slavery, emancipation and the Thirteenth Amendment. Moreover, the authors deal with their subjects through a variety of approaches and interpretive lenses, thereby furnishing readers with several perspectives on these important subjects."-- Richard W. Etulain , author of Beyond the Missouri: The Story of the American West

To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.

Summaries
Long Description
Lincoln's reelection in 1864 was a pivotal moment in the history of the United States. The Emancipation Proclamation had officially gone into effect on January 1, 1863, and the proposed Thirteenth Amendment had become a campaign issue. "Lincoln"" and Freedom: Slavery, Emancipation, and the Thirteenth Amendment" captures these historic times, profiling the individuals, events, and enactments that led to slavery's abolition. Fifteen leading Lincoln scholars contribute to this collection, covering slavery from its roots in 1619 Jamestown, through the adoption of the Constitution, to Abraham Lincoln's presidency. This comprehensive volume, edited by Harold Holzer and Sara Vaughn Gabbard, presents Abraham Lincoln's response to the issue of slavery as politician, president, writer, orator, and commander-in-chief. Topics include the history of slavery in North America, the Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, the evolution of Lincoln's view of presidential powers, the influence of religion on Lincoln, and the effects of the Emancipation Proclamation. This collection effectively explores slavery as a Constitutional issue, both from the viewpoint of the original intent of the nation's founders as they failed to deal with slavery, and as a study of the Constitutional authority of the commander-in-chief as Lincoln interpreted it. Addressed are the timing of Lincoln's decision for emancipation and its effect on the public, the military, and the slaves themselves. Other topics covered include the role of the U.S. Colored Troops, the election campaign of 1864, and the legislative debate over the Thirteenth Amendment. The volume concludes with a heavily illustrated essay on the rolethat iconography played in forming and informing public opinion about emancipation and the amendments that officially granted freedom and civil rights to African Americans. " Lincoln and Freedom "provides a comprehensive political history of slavery in America and offers a rare look at how Lincoln's views, statements, and actions played a vital role in the story of emancipation.
Main Description
Lincoln's reelection in 1864 was a pivotal moment in the history of the United States. The Emancipation Proclamation had officially gone into effect on January 1, 1863, and the proposed Thirteenth Amendment had become a campaign issue. Lincoln and Freedom: Slavery, Emancipation, and the Thirteenth Amendment captures these historic times, profiling the individuals, events, and enactments that led to slavery's abolition. Fifteen leading Lincoln scholars contribute to this collection, covering slavery from its roots in 1619 Jamestown, through the adoption of the Constitution, to Abraham Lincoln's presidency. This comprehensive volume, edited by Harold Holzer and Sara Vaughn Gabbard, presents Abraham Lincoln's response to the issue of slavery as politician, president, writer, orator, and commander-in-chief. Topics include the history of slavery in North America, the Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, the evolution of Lincoln's view of presidential powers, the influence of religion on Lincoln, and the effects of the Emancipation Proclamation. This collection effectively explores slavery as a Constitutional issue, both from the viewpoint of the original intent of the nation's founders as they failed to deal with slavery, and as a study of the Constitutional authority of the commander-in-chief as Lincoln interpreted it. Addressed are the timing of Lincoln's decision for emancipation and its effect on the public, the military, and the slaves themselves. Other topics covered include the role of the U.S. Colored Troops, the election campaign of 1864, and the legislative debate over the Thirteenth Amendment. The volume concludes with a heavily illustrated essay on the role that iconography played in forming and informing public opinion about emancipation and the amendments that officially granted freedom and civil rights to African Americans. Lincoln and Freedom provides a comprehensive political history of slavery in America and offers a rare look at how Lincoln's views, statements, and actions played a vital role in the story of emancipation.
Main Description
Lincoln's reelection in 1864 was a pivotal moment in the history of the United States. The Emancipation Proclamation had officially gone into effect on January 1, 1863, and the proposed Thirteenth Amendment had become a campaign issue.Lincolnand Freedom: Slavery, Emancipation, and the Thirteenth Amendmentcaptures these historic times, profiling the individuals, events, and enactments that led to slavery's abolition. Fifteen leading Lincoln scholars contribute to this collection, covering slavery from its roots in 1619 Jamestown, through the adoption of the Constitution, to Abraham Lincoln's presidency. This comprehensive volume, edited by Harold Holzer and Sara Vaughn Gabbard, presents Abraham Lincoln's response to the issue of slavery as politician, president, writer, orator, and commander-in-chief. Topics include the history of slavery in North America, the Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, the evolution of Lincoln's view of presidential powers, the influence of religion on Lincoln, and the effects of the Emancipation Proclamation. This collection effectively explores slavery as a Constitutional issue, both from the viewpoint of the original intent of the nation's founders as they failed to deal with slavery, and as a study of the Constitutional authority of the commander-in-chief as Lincoln interpreted it. Addressed are the timing of Lincoln's decision for emancipation and its effect on the public, the military, and the slaves themselves. Other topics covered include the role of the U.S. Colored Troops, the election campaign of 1864, and the legislative debate over the Thirteenth Amendment. The volume concludes with a heavily illustrated essay on the role that iconography played in forming and informing public opinion about emancipation and the amendments that officially granted freedom and civil rights to African Americans. Lincoln and Freedomprovides a comprehensive political history of slavery in America and offers a rare look at how Lincoln's views, statements, and actions played a vital role in the story of emancipation.
Main Description
Lincoln's reelection in 1864 was a pivotal moment in the history of the United States. The Emancipation Proclamation had officially gone into effect on January 1, 1863, and the proposed Thirteenth Amendment had become a campaign issue.Lincolnand Freedom: Slavery, Emancipation, and the Thirteenth Amendmentcaptures these historic times, profiling the individuals, events, and enactments that led to slavery's abolition. Fifteen leading Lincoln scholars contribute to this collection, covering slavery from its roots in 1619 Jamestown, through the adoption of the Constitution, to Abraham Lincoln's presidency. This comprehensive volume, edited by Harold Holzer and Sara Vaughn Gabbard, presents Abraham Lincoln's response to the issue of slavery as politician, president, writer, orator, and commander-in-chief. Topics include the history of slavery in North America, the Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, the evolution of Lincoln's view of presidential powers, the influence of religion on Lincoln, and the effects of the Emancipation Proclamation. This collection probingly explores slavery as a Constitutional issue, both from the viewpoint of the original intent of the nation's founders as they failed to deal with slavery, and as a study of the Constitutional authority of the commander-in-chief as Lincoln interpreted it. Addressed are the timing of Lincoln's decision for emancipation and its effect on the public, the military, and the slaves themselves. Other topics covered include the role of the U.S. Colored Troops, the election campaign of 1864, and the legislative debate over the Thirteenth Amendment. The volume concludes with a heavily illustrated essay on the role that iconography played in forming and informing public opinion about emancipation and the amendments that officially granted freedom and civil rights to African Americans. Lincoln and Freedomprovides a comprehensive political history of slavery in America and offers a rare look at how Lincoln's views, statements, and actions played a vital role in the story of emancipation.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. VII
Introductionp. 1
Slavery during Lincoln's Lifetimep. 7
Lincoln's Critique of Dred Scott as a Vindication of the Foundingp. 20
Lincoln and the Limits of Constitutional Authorityp. 37
Lincoln, God, and Freedom: A Promise Fulfilledp. 48
"Sublime in Its Magnitude": The Emancipation Proclamationp. 65
Lincoln's Summer of Emancipationp. 79
The Role of the Pressp. 100
Marching to Freedom: The U.S. Colored Troopsp. 113
Lincoln and the Rhetoric of Freedomp. 130
Ballots over Bullets: Freedom and the 1864 Electionp. 143
The Constitution, the Amendment Process, and the Abolition of Slaveryp. 160
The Thirteenth Amendment Enactedp. 180
"That Which Congress So Nobly Began": The Men Who Passed the Thirteenth Amendment Resolutionp. 195
The End of the Beginning: Abraham Lincoln and the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendmentsp. 213
Picturing Freedom: The Thirteenth Amendment in the Graphic Artsp. 233
Contributorsp. 259
Indexp. 263
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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