Catalogue


The advancement of liberty : how American democratic principles transformed the twentieth century /
Matthew C. Price.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger Security International, 2008.
description
xi, 339 p.
ISBN
9780313346187 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger Security International, 2008.
isbn
9780313346187 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6348389
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-12-01:
Political scientist Price (Texas A&M Univ., Kingsville) attempts to counter what he perceives as unfair criticism of the US as an "imperial" power, criticism that, he argues, has turned the majority of students into clueless relativists. Surely, a case can be made for a more balanced view of US foreign policy (from either side), but despite some suggestion that this is what Price is after, it becomes clear that he wants to go further by arguing that US actions are in fact informed by exceptional and underappreciated beneficence and sacrifice. The result reads as maddeningly polemical and unconvincing. His evidence includes lots of political rhetoric and opinion polls showing that many Americans see themselves as beneficent, but he fails to realize that these are part of what should be analyzed. There is little to no evidence that reveals or analyzes the motivations of the policy-making elites in Washington. Additionally, Price consistently omits or explains away elements that would trouble his thesis. The author never truly engages with the literature he purports to correct, with no real discussion of economics, culture, or concepts like "informal empire," which have shed abundant critical light on US policy motivations. Summing Up: Not recommended. D. N. Buckaloo Coe College
Reviews
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Choice, December 2008
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Summaries
Long Description
This book is a counterpoint to the prevailing view that the United States is an imperialist nation that has violently pursued power in the world to advance its own narrow interests. The basic theme is that at the dawn of the 20th century, there were six democracies in the world, but by century's end, democracy was ascendant. This epic historical transformation has been thanks in great measure to the vision and sacrifices made by Americans. Matthew C. Price examines the great conflicts of the 20th century, showing how American democratic principles have utterly reshaped global values and politics. The defeat of fascism and imperialism in World War II led to the Marshall Plan, the single most influential rebuilding program in human history. The fostering of democracy in Japan, the establishment of the UN, and the fall of the Soviet Union reshaped the world in unforeseen ways. America has dedicated itself to democracy in the Middle East, to democratization in China, and to the larger quest for the spread of liberal democratic principles worldwide, even when the struggle is difficult, dangerous, and ongoing. Early in the century, Woodrow Wilson said that America should make the world safe for democracy. In taking up that challenge, the United States changed human history.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Providing a broad historical treatment of American democracy overseas for the general reader, Price examines the most influential conflicts in global history. He also sets out a revisionist account of American history, arguing that the United States has made the world 'safe for democracy'.
Long Description
This book is a counterpoint to the prevailing view that the United States is an imperialist nation that has violently pursued power in the world to advance its own narrow interests. The basic theme is that at the dawn of the twentieth century, there were six democracies in the world, but by century's end, democracy was ascendant. This epic historical transformation has been thanks in great measure to the vision and sacrifices made by Americans. Matthew C. Price examines the great conflicts of the twentieth century, showing how American democratic principles have utterly reshaped global values and politics. Defeats over fascism and imperialism led to the Marshall Plan, the single most influential rebuilding program in human history. Moreover, the fostering of democracy in Japan, the establishment of the UN, and the fall of the Soviet Union reshaped the world in unforeseen ways. America has dedicated itself to democracy in the Middle East, to the democratization in China, and to the larger quest for the spread of liberal democratic principles worldwide, even when the struggle is difficult, dangerous, and ongoing. Early in the century, Woodrow Wilson said that America should "make the world safe for democracy." In doing so, the United States changed human history.
Long Description
The Advancement of Liberty offers a counterpoint to the prevailing view that the United States is an imperialist nation that has violently pursued power in the world to advance its own narrow interests. At the dawn of the 20th century, there were six democracies in the world, but by century's end, democracy was ascendant. Matthew C. Price maintains that this epic historical transformation occurred, thanks in great measure, to the vision and sacrifices made by Americans. To underscore his thesis, Price examines the great conflicts of the 20th century, showing how American democratic principles have utterly reshaped global values and politics. The defeat of fascism and imperialism in World War II led to the Marshall Plan, the single most influential rebuilding program in human history. The fostering of democracy in Japan, the establishment of the UN, and the fall of the Soviet Union reshaped the world in unforeseen ways. America has dedicated itself to democracy in the Middle East, to democratization in China, and to the larger quest for the spread of liberal democratic principles worldwide, even when the struggle is difficult, dangerous, and ongoing. Early in the century, Woodrow Wilson said that America should "make the world safe for democracy." In taking up that challenge, the United States changed human history.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. ix
"We Seek No Indemnities for Ourselves"p. 1
Triumph over Fascismp. 17
A New and Changed Worldp. 67
Establishing a Community of Nationsp. 93
Promoting Justice in the Middle Eastp. 115
Taming the Red Dragonp. 149
Crusade for Freedomp. 183
A World Safe for Democracyp. 281
Notesp. 289
Select Bibliographyp. 315
Indexp. 335
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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