Catalogue


Kiowa humanity and the invasion of the state /
Jacki Thompson Rand.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008.
description
ix, 198 p.
ISBN
0803239661 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780803239661 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008.
isbn
0803239661 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780803239661 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
The American problem -- The Kiowa scheme of life -- Values of the state and U.S. Indian policy -- Young Kiowa men, Kiowa social values, and the politics of rations -- Fictions of nineteenth-century American assimilation policy -- Households of humanity -- Conclusion.
catalogue key
6348378
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2009-04-01:
In this immensely readable work, Rand (Univ. of Iowa) argues that by taking over the lands and attempting to destroy the culture of the Kiowa and other southwestern Native American groups, the US acted as a colonial power. The author approaches her topic from several standpoints, including changes to the Kiowa way of life and the impact of annuities on Kiowa traditional customs and food-gathering practices. She spotlights several Indian agents in particular who used annuities as bargaining chips to control both reservation and nonreservation Kiowas during the late 19th century. One very valuable chapter addresses the important role of Kiowa women as food procurers, tipi makers, and craftswomen during this same time period. Rand also discusses Richard Pratt and his attempts to assimilate and educate Kiowa prisoners at Fort Marion, Florida. The book does not flow smoothly from chapter to chapter, perhaps because some chapters have been previously published. Chapters 2-6 are overly long, but this problem can be overcome by treating each one as a stand-alone essay. Not strongly suggested for most undergraduates, but highly appropriate for upperclassmen and graduate students with a strong background in Southern Plains Indian history. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. A. Boughter University of Nebraska at Omaha
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[ Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the State ] fills a void within Native American history by interweaving the social and political milieu of the reservation period with the basic facts related to American Indian actions as the American frontier rolled over and through American Indian cultures."Joe Watkins, New Mexico Historical Review
"[Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the State] fills a void within Native American history by interweaving the social and political milieu of the reservation period with the basic facts related to American Indian actions as the American frontier rolled over and through American Indian cultures."Joe Watkins,New Mexico Historical Review
"Rand has found useful sources to reinforce "Kiowa humanity" (and by implication other Natives) and prompts readers to rethink language and perspectives ingrained in traditional American history narratives."Robert W. Galler, Jr., Western Historical Quarterly
"Rand has found useful sources to reinforce "Kiowa humanity" (and by implication other Natives) and prompts readers to rethink language and perspectives ingrained in traditional American history narratives."Robert W. Galler, Jr.,Western Historical Quarterly
"Rand has written a book that explores the complications and nuances of Native history, one that should be used by scholars, journalists, and museum curators in better integrating American Indians into that national consciousness and academic discourse."Jill Norgren, American Historical Review
"Rand has written a book that explores the complications and nuances of Native history, one that should be used by scholars, journalists, and museum curators in better integrating American Indians into that national consciousness and academic discourse."Jill Norgren,American Historical Review
"Rand''s account of Kiowa creativity under life-threatening conditions offers a compelling synthesis of agency and oppression, one that asks readers to take genocide seriously while affirming Kiowaand Nativehumanity."Jeffrey Ostler, Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"Rand''s account of Kiowa creativity under life-threatening conditions offers a compelling synthesis of agency and oppression, one that asks readers to take genocide seriously while affirming Kiowaand Nativehumanity."Jeffrey Ostler,Journal of Interdisciplinary History
"This is a well-written and genuinely intriguing story, and Rand weaves together a concise portrait of federal Indian policy towards the Kiowas during the nineteenth century. Her reengagement of Jenning''s conquest model of Indian history should provoke ample discussion and engage new debates in the field."Nathan Wilson, Great Plains Quarterly
"This is a well-written and genuinely intriguing story, and Rand weaves together a concise portrait of federal Indian policy towards the Kiowas during the nineteenth century. Her reengagement of Jenning''s conquest model of Indian history should provoke ample discussion and engage new debates in the field."Nathan Wilson,Great Plains Quarterly
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2009
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
"Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the State" illuminates the ways in which Kiowas on the southern plains dealt with the U.S. government7;s efforts to control them after they were forced onto a reservation by an 1867 treaty. The overarching effects of colonial domination resembled those suffered by other Native groups at the time2;a considerable loss of land and population decline, as well as a continual erosion of the Kiowas7; political, cultural, economic, and religious sovereignty and traditions. Although readily acknowledging these far-reaching consequences, Jacki Thompson Rand sees the root impact of colonialism and the concomitant Kiowa responses as centered less on policy disputes than on the disruptions to their daily life and to their humanity. Colonialism attacked the Kiowas on the most human, everyday level2;through starvation, outbreaks of smallpox, emotional disorientation, and continual difficulties in securing clothing and shelter, and the Kiowas7; responses and counterassertions of sovereignty thus tended to focus on efforts to feed their people, sustain the physical community, and preserve psychic equilibrium. Offering a fresh, original view of Native responses to colonialism, this study demonstrates amply that Native struggles against the encroachment of the state go well beyond armed resistance and political strategizing. Rand shows that the Native response was born of everyday survival and the yearning for well-being and community
Main Description
Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the State illuminates the ways in which Kiowas on the southern plains dealt with the U.S. government's efforts to control them after they were forced onto a reservation by an 1867 treaty. The overarching effects of colonial domination resembled those suffered by other Native groups at the time-a considerable loss of land and population decline, as well as a continual erosion of the Kiowas' political, cultural, economic, and religious sovereignty and traditions. Although readily acknowledging these far-reaching consequences, Jacki Thompson Rand sees the root impact of colonialism and the concomitant Kiowa responses as centered less on policy disputes than on the disruptions to their daily life and to their humanity. Colonialism attacked the Kiowas on the most human, everyday level-through starvation, outbreaks of smallpox, emotional disorientation, and continual difficulties in securing clothing and shelter, and the Kiowas' responses and counterassertions of sovereignty thus tended to focus on efforts to feed their people, sustain the physical community, and preserve psychic equilibrium.Offering a fresh, original view of Native responses to colonialism, this study demonstrates amply that Native struggles against the encroachment of the state go well beyond armed resistance and political strategizing. Rand shows that the Native response was born of everyday survival and the yearning for well-being and community
Main Description
Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the Stateilluminates the ways in which Kiowas on the southern plains dealt with the U.S. government's efforts to control them after they were forced onto a reservation by an 1867 treaty. The overarching effects of colonial domination resembled those suffered by other Native groups at the time-a considerable loss of land and population decline, as well as a continual erosion of the Kiowas' political, cultural, economic, and religious sovereignty and traditions. Although readily acknowledging these far-reaching consequences, Jacki Thompson Rand sees the root impact of colonialism and the concomitant Kiowa responses as centered less on policy disputes than on the disruptions to their daily life and to their humanity. Colonialism attacked the Kiowas on the most human, everyday level-through starvation, outbreaks of smallpox, emotional disorientation, and continual difficulties in securing clothing and shelter, and the Kiowas' responses and counterassertions of sovereignty thus tended to focus on efforts to feed their people, sustain the physical community, and preserve psychic equilibrium.Offering a fresh, original view of Native responses to colonialism, this study demonstrates amply that Native struggles against the encroachment of the state go well beyond armed resistance and political strategizing. Rand shows that the Native response was born of everyday survival and the yearning for well-being and community
Main Description
Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the Stateilluminates the ways in which Kiowas on the southern plains dealt with the U.S. government's efforts to control them after they were forced onto a reservation by an 1867 treaty. The overarching effects of colonial domination resembled those suffered by other Native groups at the timea considerable loss of land and population decline, as well as a continual erosion of the Kiowas' political, cultural, economic, and religious sovereignty and traditions. Although readily acknowledging these far-reaching consequences, Jacki Thompson Rand sees the root impact of colonialism and the concomitant Kiowa responses as centered less on policy disputes than on the disruptions to their daily life and to their humanity. Colonialism attacked the Kiowas on the most human, everyday levelthrough starvation, outbreaks of smallpox, emotional disorientation, and continual difficulties in securing clothing and shelter, and the Kiowas' responses and counterassertions of sovereignty thus tended to focus on efforts to feed their people, sustain the physical community, and preserve psychic equilibrium. Offering a fresh, original view of Native responses to colonialism, this study demonstrates amply that Native struggles against the encroachment of the state go well beyond armed resistance and political strategizing. Rand shows that the Native response was born of everyday survival and the yearning for well-being and community
Main Description
Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the State illuminates the ways in which Kiowas on the southern plains dealt with the U.S. government's efforts to control them after they were forced onto a reservation by an 1867 treaty. The overarching effects of colonial domination resembled those suffered by other Native groups at the timea considerable loss of land and population decline, as well as a continual erosion of the Kiowas' political, cultural, economic, and religious sovereignty and traditions. Although readily acknowledging these far-reaching consequences, Jacki Thompson Rand sees the root impact of colonialism and the concomitant Kiowa responses as centered less on policy disputes than on the disruptions to their daily life and to their humanity. Colonialism attacked the Kiowas on the most human, everyday levelthrough starvation, outbreaks of smallpox, emotional disorientation, and continual difficulties in securing clothing and shelter, and the Kiowas' responses and counterassertions of sovereignty thus tended to focus on efforts to feed their people, sustain the physical community, and preserve psychic equilibrium. Offering a fresh, original view of Native responses to colonialism, this study demonstrates amply that Native struggles against the encroachment of the state go well beyond armed resistance and political strategizing. Rand shows that the Native response was born of everyday survival and the yearning for well-being and community
Main Description
Kiowa Humanity and the Invasion of the Stateilluminates the ways in which Kiowas on the southern plains dealt with the U.S. government's efforts to control them after they were forced onto a reservation by an 1867 treaty. The overarching effects of colonial domination resembled those suffered by other Native groups at the time--a considerable loss of land and population decline, as well as a continual erosion of the Kiowas' political, cultural, economic, and religious sovereignty and traditions. Although readily acknowledging these far-reaching consequences, Jacki Thompson Rand sees the root impact of colonialism and the concomitant Kiowa responses as centered less on policy disputes than on the disruptions to their daily life and to their humanity. Colonialism attacked the Kiowas on the most human, everyday level--through starvation, outbreaks of smallpox, emotional disorientation, and continual difficulties in securing clothing and shelter, and the Kiowas' responses and counterassertions of sovereignty thus tended to focus on efforts to feed their people, sustain the physical community, and preserve psychic equilibrium. Offering a fresh, original view of Native responses to colonialism, this study demonstrates amply that Native struggles against the encroachment of the state go well beyond armed resistance and political strategizing. Rand shows that the Native response was born of everyday survival and the yearning for well-being and community
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
The American Problemp. 1
The Kiowa Scheme of Lifep. 11
Values of the State and U.S. Indian Policyp. 33
Young Kiowa Men, Kiowa Social Values, and the Politics of Rationsp. 58
Fictions of Nineteenth-Century American Assimilation Policyp. 93
Households of Humanityp. 126
Conclusionp. 151
U.S. Indian Appropriations and Disbursements, 1860-1910p. 157
Government Document Sources of Population Figuresp. 160
Notesp. 161
Bibliographyp. 177
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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