Catalogue


Transatlantic engagements with the British eighteenth century /
Pamela J. Albert.
imprint
New York : Routledge, 2008.
description
x, 227 p.
ISBN
0415957435, 9780415957434
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Routledge, 2008.
isbn
0415957435
9780415957434
catalogue key
6343143
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Postcolonial Engagements with the British Eighteenth Century revisits eighteenth-century cultural artifacts through the lens of creative works produced by contemporary writers Beryl Gilroy (Guyana), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Wole Soyinka (Nigeria), and David Dabydeen (Guyana).
Main Description
Transatlantic Engagements with the British Eighteenth Centuryrevisits eighteenth-century cultural artifacts through the lens of creative works produced by contemporary writers Beryl Gilroy (Guyana), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Wole Soyinka (Nigeria), and David Dabydeen (Guyana). While early studies of post-colonization literature focused on how revisions of historical works "write back" to the British empire, this study argues that trans-historical, cross-cultural dialogues also reveal the global complexity of eighteenth-century cultural forms (i.e. the periodical essay, travel narrative, pantomime, satirical engraving, and slave narrative). By transforming the generic form of their eighteenth-century sources, the African and Caribbean writers in this study strategically call attention to the modes of storytelling utilized by eighteenth-century writers Richard Steele, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, William Hogarth, Isaac Bickerstaff, and Ignatius Sancho, and subsequently expose how the encounters, exchanges, and acts of resistance taking place around the world influenced aesthetic experimentation in England. Transatlantic Engagements with the British Eighteenth Centuryis thus a reconsideration of eighteenth-century literature, art, and drama. However, because these engagements with British literature, art, and drama concurrently reflect twentieth-century encounters with neocolonial oppression, political violence, and racism, this study also proposes that engagements with the British eighteenth century double as inquiries into whether the modern world has progressed since the eighteenth century.
Back Cover Copy
PostcolonialEngagements with the British Eighteenth Century revisits eighteenth-century cultural artifacts through the lens of creative works produced by contemporary writers Beryl Gilroy (Guyana), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Wole Soyinka (Nigeria), and David Dabydeen (Guyana). While early studies of post-colonization literature focused on how revisions of historical works "write back" to the British empire, this study argues that trans-historical, cross-cultural dialogues also reveal the global complexity of eighteenth-century cultural forms (i.e. the periodical essay, travel narrative, pantomime, satirical engraving, and slave narrative). By transforming the generic form of their eighteenth-century sources, the African and Caribbean writers in this study strategically call attention to the modes of storytelling utilized by eighteenth-century writers Richard Steele, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, William Hogarth, Isaac Bickerstaff, and Ignatius Sancho, and subsequently expose how the encounters, exchanges, and acts of resistance taking place around the world influenced aesthetic experimentation in England. Transatlantic Engagements with the British Eighteenth Century is thus a reconsideration of eighteenth-century literature, art and drama. However, because these engagements with British literature, art and drama concurrently reflect twentieth-century encounters with neocolonial oppression, political violence and racism, this study also proposes that engagements with the British eighteenth century double as inquiries into whether the modern world has progressed since the eighteenth century.
Back Cover Copy
Transatlantic Engagements with the British Eighteenth Century revisits eighteenth-century cultural artifacts through the lens of creative works produced by contemporary writers Beryl Gilroy (Guyana), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Wole Soyinka (Nigeria), and David Dabydeen (Guyana). While early studies of post-colonization literature focused on how revisions of historical works "write back" to the British empire, this study argues that trans-historical, cross-cultural dialogues also reveal the global complexity of eighteenth-century cultural forms (i.e. the periodical essay, travel narrative, pantomime, satirical engraving, and slave narrative). By transforming the generic form of their eighteenth-century sources, the African and Caribbean writers in this study strategically call attention to the modes of storytelling utilized by eighteenth-century writers Richard Steele, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, William Hogarth, Isaac Bickerstaff, and Ignatius Sancho, and subsequently expose how the encounters, exchanges, and acts of resistance taking place around the world influenced aesthetic experimentation in England. Transatlantic Engagements with the British Eighteenth Century is thus a reconsideration of eighteenth-century literature, art, and drama. However, because these engagements with British literature, art, and drama concurrently reflect twentieth-century encounters with neocolonial oppression, political violence, and racism, this study also proposes that engagements with the British eighteenth century double as inquiries into whether the modern world has progressed since the eighteenth century.
Back Cover Copy
Postcolonial Engagements with the British Eighteenth Century revisits eighteenth-century cultural artifacts through the lens of creative works produced by contemporary writers Beryl Gilroy (Guyana), Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Wole Soyinka (Nigeria), and David Dabydeen (Guyana). While early studies of post-colonization literature focused on how revisions of historical works "write back" to the British empire, this study argues that trans-historical, cross-cultural dialogues also reveal the global complexity of eighteenth-century cultural forms (i.e. the periodical essay, travel narrative, pantomime, satirical engraving, and slave narrative). By transforming the generic form of their eighteenth-century sources, the African and Caribbean writers in this study strategically call attention to the modes of storytelling utilized by eighteenth-century writers Richard Steele, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, William Hogarth, Isaac Bickerstaff, and Ignatius Sancho, and subsequently expose how the encounters, exchanges, and acts of resistance taking place around the world influenced aesthetic experimentation in England. Transatlantic Engagements with the British Eighteenth Century is thus a reconsideration of eighteenth-century literature, art and drama. However, because these engagements with British literature, art and drama concurrently reflect twentieth-century encounters with neocolonial oppression, political violence and racism, this study also proposes that engagements with the British eighteenth century double as inquiries into whether the modern world has progressed since the eighteenth century.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Transatlantic Retrospectionsp. 1
Reading Periodically: Beryl Gilroy's Inkle and Yarico and Richard Steele's The Spectator No. 11p. 19
Novel Poetics and Pantomimes: Derek Walcott's Crusoe Poems, Pantomime, and Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoep. 48
Satire's Spectacles: Wole Soyinka's "Gulliver" and Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travelsp. 75
Visual and Textual Narratives: David Dabydeen's A Harlot's Progress and William Hogarth's A Harlot's Progressp. 103
Literary Impersonations: Beryl Gilroy's Stedman and Joanna: A love in Bondage and John Gabriel Stedman's Journal and Narrativep. 135
Epilogue: Global Retrospectionsp. 166
Notesp. 171
Bibliographyp. 201
Indexp. 217
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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