Catalogue


Mapping in Michigan & the Great Lakes region /
edited by David I. Macleod.
imprint
East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2007.
description
ix, 377 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm.
ISBN
0870138073 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780870138072 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2007.
isbn
0870138073 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780870138072 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction / David Buisseret -- Louis Charles Karpinski and the cartography of the Great Lakes / Mary Sponberg Pedley -- First nations mapmaking in the Great Lakes Region in intercultural contexts: a historical review / G. Malcolm Lewis -- The 1767 maps of Robert Rogers and Jonathan Carver: a proposal for the establishment of the colony of Michilimackinac / Keith R. Widder -- Motives for mapping the Great Lakes: upper Canada, 1782-1827 / J. P. D. Dunbabin --The search for the Canadian-American boundary along the Michigan frontier, 1819-1827: the boundary commissions under articles six and seven of the Treaty of Ghent / Francis M. Carroll -- The holes in the grid: reservation surveys in lower Michigan / Margaret Wickens Pearce -- Mapping the grand transverse Indian country: the contributions of Peter Dougherty / Helen Hornbeck Tanner -- Picturing progress: assessing the nineteenth-century atlas-map bonanza / Cheryl Lyon-Jenness -- An evaluation of plat, Sanborn, and panoramic maps of cities and towns in Michigan / David K. Patton, Amy K. Lobben, Bruce M. C. Pape -- Tracing Euro-American settlement expansion in southern lower Michigan / Kenneth E. Lewis -- The shifting agendas of Midwestern official state highway maps / James R. Akerman, Daniel Block -- Michigan: cartographic perspectives on the Great Lakes state / Gerald A. Danzer.
general note
Papers originally presented at a conference held June 11-12, 2004, at Central Michigan University.
catalogue key
6338289
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-04-01:
These separately authored chapters are revised from invited conference papers previously published in the Michigan Historical Review. A new introduction by David Buisseret provides some synthesis and comparative contexts for the themes in each of the 12 chapters, which provide insights into the general theme: motives for mapping Michigan. Topics include aboriginal issues, colonial mapping, establishing boundaries, commercial and state-sponsored mapping, and settlement. Unique among the chapters is Mary Pedley's biographical account of Louis Karpinski, author of the well-known Bibliography of the Printed Maps of Michigan (1931). A serious shortcoming of this work is that it is neither inclusive nor comprehensive, but a rather esoteric collection of chapters related to motives for mapping Michigan and the Great Lakes. In particular, neither the work nor the last chapter, which is written by Gerald Danzer and attempts to provide a general survey, includes reference to any important federal mapping activities (e.g., US Lake Survey, Geological Survey's topographic mapping program) other than the US Public Land Survey. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students through faculty. S. R. McEathron University of Kansas
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Choice, April 2008
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Summaries
Main Description
Following a comparative introduction by the noted cartographic historian David Buisseret, twelve chapters tell more particular stories. Often these narratives extend well beyond the limits of today's state of Michigan. Native-American mapmakers sought to give directions and convey cosmological meanings and political relationships; only gradually did they adopt the geometric framing and uniformity of European maps, which reflected a different set of cultural attitudes. Would-be colonial governors mapped to promote their dreams. Boundary commissioners surveyed and mapped to settle contested claims and lay the foundations for peace along the U.S.-Canadian border. On the Canadian side, surveyors drew maps to build up the new British colony against American influences and encroachments. Mapmakers were also ambitious entrepreneurs, peddling illustrated county atlases to proud farm owners, bird's-eye views to show off towns, and plat and insurance maps to aid property development.
Main Description
An illustrated chapter on the renowned Michigan map expert Louis Karpinski opens this volume, following a comparative introduction by the noted cartographic historian David Buisseret. Twelve chapters tell particular stories. Often these narratives extend well beyond the limits of today's state of Michigan. Ameican Indian mapmakers sought to give directions and convey cosmological meanings and political relationships; only gradually did they adopt the geometric framing and uniformity of European maps, which reflected a different set of cultural attitudes. Would-be colonial governors mapped to promote their dreams. Boundary commissioners surveyed and mapped to settle contested claims and lay the foundations for peace along the U.S.-Canadian border. On the Canadian side, surveyors drew maps to build up the new British colony against American influences and encroachments. Mapmakers were also ambitious entrepreneurs, peddling illustrated county atlases to proud farm owners, bird's-eye views to show off towns, and plat and insurance maps to aid property development. In describing how people produced and used maps, contributors tell a larger story of one region's peoples and cultures-and of a nation's zeal for exploration.
Table of Contents
Louis Charles Karpinski and the Cartography of the Great Lakesp. 13
First Nations Mapmaking in the Great Lakes Region in Intercultural Contexts: A Historical Reviewp. 39
The 1767 Maps of Robert Rogers and Jonathan Carver: A Proposal for the Establishment of the Colony of Michilimackinacp. 63
Motives for Mapping the Great Lakes: Upper Canada, 1782-1827p. 91
The Search for the Canadian-American Boundary along the Michigan Frontier, 1819-1827: The Boundary Commissions under Articles Six and Seven of the Treaty of Ghentp. 123
The Holes in the Grid: Reservation Surveys in Lower Michiganp. 145
Mapping the Grand Traverse Indian Country: The Contributions of Peter Doughertyp. 173
Picturing Progress: Assessing the Nineteenth-Century Atlas-Map Bonanzap. 209
An Evaluation of Plat, Sanborn, and Panoramic Maps of Cities and Towns in Michiganp. 241
Tracing Euro-American Settlement Expansion in Southern Lower Michiganp. 263
The Shifting Agendas of Midwestern Official State Highway Mapsp. 287
Michigan: Cartographic Perspectives on the Great Lakes Statep. 319
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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