Catalogue


The entrepreneur's guide to writing business plans and proposals /
K. Dennis Chambers.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2008.
description
xiv, 184 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0275994988 (alk. paper), 9780275994983 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2008.
isbn
0275994988 (alk. paper)
9780275994983 (alk. paper)
contents note
How to write a business plan. Start from strength : what's in it for me? -- Capture the elusive readers : what's in it for them? -- Conquer the first draft : the easy part -- Edit for power : the hard part -- Prepare for success : develop a realistic marketing plan -- Demonstrate financial credibility : money still makes the world go 'round / by Gerry Young -- Writing in the twenty-first century : a guide to today's new mechanics -- How to write a business proposal. Raise the bar : what you are really proposing -- Tie the knot : why your proposal makes the prospect so nervous -- The art and science of persuasion : convince readers to see it your way -- Watch winners at work : a model proposal.
catalogue key
6333548
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-06-01:
In this well-written book, Chambers (an advertising consultant and adjunct instructor at Endicott and Emerson colleges) takes the position that developers/writers of business plans and proposals need to focus on the value proposition--the "what's in it for them" of the reader. He argues that persuasiveness and clarity are the virtues that will accomplish the objective, no matter if it is securing venture capital or financing, closing on a large contract, or laying out a marketing strategy: words that "sell" are more important than those that fill information gaps or update previous information. Chambers writes with the insightful clarity that he espouses and provides many practical examples of plans and letters, as well as exercises, templates, and cases. His advice provides a useful compendium and is somewhat an Elements of Style (the classic on good writing by William Strunk Jr., 4th ed., 1999) for business plan and proposal writers. This reviewer could not help but sigh in agreement with the author's preference for hard copy rather than electronic format for some processes; while this may pass, the practical wisdom of the author will endure. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduate through practitioner collections. S. A. Schulman CUNY Kingsborough Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Entrepreneurs--and entrepreneurial companies--live or die by the quality of their plans and proposals. Whether it's to get funding for a new product line or business from a client, writing hard-hitting prose that answers essential questions and makes specific requests is an indispensable skill. Entrepreneur, ad man, and writing teacher Dennis Chambers shows how entrepreneurs can persuade people, through skillful writing, to pony up capital or contracts. This ability--which can be learned--is rare in today's media-saturated world. But it counts more than ever if an entrepreneur wants to make it over the magical "five-year" hump and on into lasting business success. Numerous examples and exercises ensure that entrepreneurs understand how the writing game is played--and that they play it well. Unfortunately, most don't play this game well. Most business writers mistakenly believe their task is to inform. They write to fill an information gap or to update the reader on a particular project. Or they write about what's important to them. What these writers do not take into account is that the speed of today's work world has reached overdrive. The typical reader simply doesn't have time to ponder dense, poorly organized information and intuit the appropriate action. And readers don't give a hoot about what's important to the writer--they want to know what's in it for themselves. Business writers need to use all the tools at their command to persuade, inspire action, and in general move a project forward. This book is about how to be persuasive in two key skills in business: writing proposals and writing business plans. Step by step, Dennis Chambers illustrates the techniques of effectivebusiness writing, with numerous examples throughout. Whether the objective is to secure financing from an investor, lay out a marketing strategy, or secure a large contract, getting results requires crafting an effective structure for the proposal, and using words that sell. Chambers is an able guide in saving entrepreneurs time and undue effort while reaching the goal of long-term business success. Besides expert advice and insights, the book includes: *Examples and practical guidance, all geared toward the entrepreneur/small business owner. *Exercises, templates, cases, glossary, and model letters and plans.
Description for Reader
Examples and practical guidance, all geared toward the entrepreneur/small business owner. Exercises, templates, cases, glossary, and model letters and plans.
Long Description
Entrepreneursand entrepreneurial companieslive or die by the quality of their plans and proposals. Whether it's to get funding for a new product line or business from a client, writing hard-hitting prose that answers essential questions and makes specific requests is an indispensable skill. Entrepreneur, ad man, and writing teacher Dennis Chambers shows how entrepreneurs can persuade people, through skillful writing, to pony up capital or contracts. This abilitywhich can be learnedis rare in today's media-saturated world. But it counts more than ever if an entrepreneur wants to make it over the magical five-year hump and on into lasting business success. Numerous examples and exercises ensure that entrepreneurs understand how the writing game is playedand that they play it well. Unfortunately, most don't play this game well. Most business writers mistakenly believe their task is to inform. They write to fill an information gap or to update the reader on a particular project. Or they write about what's important to them. What these writers do not take into account is that the speed of today's work world has reached overdrive. The typical reader simply doesn't have time to ponder dense, poorly organized information and intuit the appropriate action. And readers don't give a hoot about what's important to the writerthey want to know what's in it for themselves. Business writers need to use all the tools at their command to persuade, inspire action, and in general move a project forward. This book is about how to be persuasive in two key skills in business: writing proposals and writing business plans. Step by step, Dennis Chambers illustrates the techniques of effective business writing, with numerous examples throughout. Whether the objective is to secure financing from an investor, lay out a marketing strategy, or secure a large contract, getting results requires crafting an effective structure for the proposal, and using words that sell. Chambers is an able guide in saving entrepreneurs time and undue effort while reaching the goal of long-term business success.
Long Description
Entrepreneurs--and entrepreneurial companies--live or die by the quality of their plans and proposals. Whether it's to get funding for a new product line or business from a client, writing hard-hitting prose that answers essential questions and makes specific requests is an indispensable skill. Entrepreneur, ad man, and writing teacher Dennis Chambers shows how entrepreneurs can persuade people, through skillful writing, to pony up capital or contracts. This ability--which can be learned--is rare in today's media-saturated world. But it counts more than ever if an entrepreneur wants to make it over the magical "five year" hump and on into lasting business success. Numerous examples and exercises ensure that entrepreneurs understand how the writing game is played--and that they play it well. Unfortunately, most don't play this game well. Most business writers mistakenly believe their task is to inform. They write to fill an information gap or to update the reader on a particular project. Or they write about what's important to them. What these writers do not take into account is that the speed of today's work world has reached overdrive. The typical reader simply doesn't have time to ponder dense, poorly organized information and intuit the appropriate action. And readers don't give a hoot about what's important to the writer--they want to know what's in it for themselves. Business writers need to use all the tools at their command to persuade, inspire action, and in general move a project forward. This book is about how to be persuasive in two key skills in business: writing proposals and writing business plans. Step by step, Dennis Chambers illustrates the techniques of effective business writing, with numerous examples throughout. Whether the objective is to secure financing from an investor, lay out a marketing strategy, or secure a large contract, getting results requires crafting an effective structure for the proposal, and using words that sell. Chambers is an able guide in saving entrepreneurs time and undue effort while reaching the goal of long-term business success. Besides expert advice and insights, the book includes: *Examples and practical guidance, all geared toward the entrepreneur/small business owner. *Exercises, templates, cases, glossary, and model letters and plans.
Bowker Data Service Summary
A writer and entrepreneur shows how business owners can win financing and customers by writing effective business plans and proposals. Exercises, templates, examples, and an appendix with model letters and plans are included.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
How to Write a Business Planp. 1
Start from Strength: What's in It for Me?p. 3
Capture the Elusive Readers: What's in It for Them?p. 20
Conquer the First Draft: The Easy Partp. 29
Edit for Power: The Hard Partp. 44
Prepare for Success: Develop a Realistic Marketing Planp. 60
Demonstrate Financial Credibility: Money Still Makes the World Go' Roundp. 68
Writing in the Twenty-First Century: A Guide to Today's New Mechanicsp. 105
How to Write a Business Proposalp. 123
Raise the Bar: What You Are Really Proposingp. 125
Tie the Knot: Why Your Proposal Makes the Prospect so Nervousp. 131
The Art and Science of Persuasion: Convince Readers to See It Your Wayp. 143
Watch Winners at Work: A Model Proposalp. 149
Appendicesp. 169
Financial Ratiosp. 169
Estimating and Calculating Direct Costsp. 169
Key Financial Termsp. 175
Financial Resources on the World Wide Webp. 177
Indexp. 181
About the Author and Contributorp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem