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An epitaph for German Judaism : from Halle to Jerusalem /
Emil L. Fackenheim.
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c2007.
description
xxxiv, 327 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0299175901 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780299175900 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c2007.
isbn
0299175901 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780299175900 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6333083
 
"Books by Emil L. Fackenheim": p. 284-[285].
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An illuminating and affecting memoir by a seminal Jewish thinker of the twentieth century."-Raul Hilberg, author ofThe Destruction of the European Jews
"An illuminating and affecting memoir by a seminal Jewish thinker of the twentieth century."--Raul Hilberg, author of "The Destruction of the European Jews"
"An illuminating and affecting memoir by a seminal Jewish thinker of the twentieth century."-Raul Hilberg, author of The Destruction of the European Jews
“An illuminating and affecting memoir by a seminal Jewish thinker of the twentieth century.”-Raul Hilberg, author of The Destruction of the European Jews
"[Fackenheim's] influence on present-day Jewish thought has been profound, and these memoirs show why. They will be indispensable both to those who seek to understand aspects of German Jewish history under the impact of Nazism, and to those who will seek to understand the impact of the Shoah on Jewish and Christian thought."-Yehuda Bauer, Hebrew University, Jerusalem
"[Fackenheim's] influence on present-day Jewish thought has been profound, and these memoirs show why. They will be indispensable both to those who seek to understand aspects of German Jewish history under the impact of Nazism, and to those who will seek to understand the impact of the Shoah on Jewish and Christian thought."--Yehuda Bauer, Hebrew University, Jerusalem
"ÝFackenheim's¨ influence on present-day Jewish thought has been profound, and these memoirs show why. They will be indispensable both to those who seek to understand aspects of German Jewish history under the impact of Nazism, and to those who will seek to understand the impact of the Shoah on Jewish and Christian thought."--Yehuda Bauer, Hebrew University, Jerusalem
"[Fackenheim's] influence on present-day Jewish thought has been profound, and these memoirs show why. They will be indispensable both to those who seek to understand aspects of German Jewish history under the impact of Nazism, and to those who will seek to understand the impact of the Shoah on Jewish and Christian thought.”-Yehuda Bauer, Hebrew University, Jerusalem
"Written in a compelling conversational voice, Fackenheim's memoir tells the story of the making of a Jewish philosopher, of a Jewish thinker, tutored by Hegel's dictum that philosophy is the strenuous 'labor of thought' that does justice to reality-for Jews a reality lacerated by the horrors of the Holocaust and yet bearing premonitions of redemption as heralded by the birth of the State of Israel."-Paul Mendes-Flohr, University of Chicago
"Written in a compelling conversational voice, Fackenheim's memoir tells the story of the making of a Jewish philosopher, of a Jewish thinker, tutored by Hegel's dictum that philosophy is the strenuous 'labor of thought' that does justice to reality--for Jews a reality lacerated by the horrors of the Holocaust and yet bearing premonitions of redemption as heralded by the birth of the State of Israel."--Paul Mendes-Flohr, University of Chicago
“Written in a compelling conversational voice, Fackenheim’s memoir tells the story of the making of a Jewish philosopher, of a Jewish thinker, tutored by Hegel’s dictum that philosophy is the strenuous ‘labor of thought’ that does justice to reality-for Jews a reality lacerated by the horrors of the Holocaust and yet bearing premonitions of redemption as heralded by the birth of the State of Israel.”-Paul Mendes-Flohr, University of Chicago
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Emil Fackenheim's life work has been to call on the world at large to confront the Holocaust as an unprecedented assault on the Jewish religion and on humanity. In this memoir, he recounts the profound and painful circumstances that shaped him as a philosopher and a committed Jewish thinker.
Long Description
Emil Fackenheim's life work was to call upon the world at large--and on philosophers, Christians, Jews, and Germans in particular--to confront the Holocaust as an unprecedented assault on the Jewish people, Judaism, and all humanity. In this memoir, to which he was making final revisions at the time of his death, Fackenheim looks back on his life, at the profound and painful circumstances that shaped him as a philosopher and a committed Jewish thinker. Interned for three months in the Sachsenhausen concentration camp after Kristallnacht, Fackenheim was released and escaped to Scotland and then to Canada, where he lived in a refugee internment camp before eventually becoming a congregational rabbi and then, for thirty-five years, a professor of philosophy. He recalls here what it meant to be a German Jew in North America, the desperate need to respond to the crisis in Europe and to cope with its overwhelming implications for Jewish identity and community. His second great turning point came in 1967, as he saw Jews threatened with another Holocaust, this time in Israel. This crisis led him on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and ultimately back to Germany, where he continued to grapple with the question, How can the Jewish faith--and the Christian faith--exist after the Holocaust?
Main Description
Emil Fackenheim's life work was to call upon the world at large-and on philosophers, Christians, Jews, and Germans in particular-to confront the Holocaust as an unprecedented assault on the Jewish people, Judaism, and all humanity. In this memoir, to which he was making final revisions at the time of his death, Fackenheim looks back on his life, at the profound and painful circumstances that shaped him as a philosopher and a committed Jewish thinker. Interned for three months in the Sachsenhausen concentration camp after Kristallnacht, Fackenheim was released and escaped to Scotland and then to Canada, where he lived in a refugee internment camp before eventually becoming a congregational rabbi and then, for thirty-five years, a professor of philosophy. He recalls here what it meant to be a German Jew in North America, the desperate need to respond to the crisis in Europe and to cope with its overwhelming implications for Jewish identity and community. His second great turning point came in 1967, as he saw Jews threatened with another Holocaust, this time in Israel. This crisis led him on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and ultimately back to Germany, where he continued to grapple with the question, How can the Jewish faith-and the Christian faith-exist after the Holocaust? "An 'epoch-making' autobiography."-Arnold Ages, Jewish Tribune
Main Description
Emil Fackenheim’s life work was to call upon the world at large-and on philosophers, Christians, Jews, and Germans in particular-to confront the Holocaust as an unprecedented assault on the Jewish people, Judaism, and all humanity. In this memoir, to which he was making final revisions at the time of his death, Fackenheim looks back on his life, at the profound and painful circumstances that shaped him as a philosopher and a committed Jewish thinker. Interned for three months in the Sachsenhausen concentration camp after Kristallnacht, Fackenheim was released and escaped to Scotland and then to Canada, where he lived in a refugee internment camp before eventually becoming a congregational rabbi and then, for thirty-five years, a professor of philosophy. He recalls here what it meant to be a German Jew in North America, the desperate need to respond to the crisis in Europe and to cope with its overwhelming implications for Jewish identity and community. His second great turning point came in 1967, as he saw Jews threatened with another Holocaust, this time in Israel. This crisis led him on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and ultimately back to Germany, where he continued to grapple with the question, How can the Jewish faith-and the Christian faith-exist after the Holocaust? “An ‘epoch-making’ autobiography.”-Arnold Ages, Jewish Tribune
Table of Contents
Foreword: To Mend the World, to Mend a Lifep. ix
Note on the Textp. xxiii
Prefacep. xxvii
Introductionp. xxxi
Germanyp. 5
Childhood and Youth in Halle (1916-1933)p. 3
Halle under Nazism (1933-1935)p. 25
"Finish Studies First, Emigrate Later" (Berlin, Spring 1935-November 10, 1938)p. 42
Last Chance in Halle (Spring 1937-November 10, 1938)p. 55
Six Months of Collapse (November 11, 1938-May 12, 1939)p. 62
Interlude
Scottish Interlude (May 12, 1939-June 1940)p. 79
Leaving the "Old World" for a New (June-July 1940)p. 84
Canada
"His Majesty's Guests" in Canada (July 1940-December 14, 1941)p. 89
University of Toronto: "Second-First" Welcome to Canada (December 15, 1941-Spring 1943)p. 94
Second Rabbinate, Hamilton (1943-1948)p. 106
"At Home in Toronto," or "Wearing Two Hats" (1948-1967)p. 137
Between Toronto and Jerusalem (1967-1983)p. 158
On Icons and Radical Evil: A Bit of Philosophyp. 179
To Jerusalemp. 183
Israel
A New Jobp. 187
Mostly Unfinished Businessp. 195
Germanyp. 200
Return to Hallep. 207
Before and After My Return to Hallep. 212
A Theo-political Decision by a Jewish Philosopherp. 217
Epilogue: Post-Holocaust Antisemitism in Europep. 221
Appendixesp. 235
Documentsp. 265
Booksp. 284
Notesp. 286
Indexp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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