Catalogue


Elin Wägner's Alarm clock : ecofeminist theory in the Interwar Era /
Katarina Leppänen.
imprint
Lanham : Lexington Books, c2008.
description
vii, 243 p.
ISBN
0739120034 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780739120033 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham : Lexington Books, c2008.
isbn
0739120034 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780739120033 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Alarm clock for the age and movement -- Matriarchy and J.J. Bachofen -- Toward a feminist politics -- Is civilization unnatural? -- Earth and the environment -- Woman as alternative -- Re:fwd:feminisms.
catalogue key
6330168
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Katarina Leppanen is a researcher at the Center for Public Sector Research and a teacher at the Department of History of Ideas and Theory of Science, Goteborg University
Reviews
Review Quotes
By reading Elin Wägner´s Väckarklocka in an European context, rather than a purely Swedish context, which is often done, many of the ideas of the book appear clearly as part of a larger political project which entailed a re-evaluation of the prevailing social order. What Leppänen shows in Elin Wägner's Alarm Clock is that the debate on matriarchy in the 1920s and 1930s was much stronger and vital than has been known before. And that this position, often characterised negatively as essentialism in modern feminist terms, was, in fact, functional and strongly emancipatory in its time and context. Elin Wägner's Alarm Clock is a good contribution to the complex history of European feminism...
By reading Elin W gner s V ckarklocka in an European context, rather than a purely Swedish context, which is often done, many of the ideas of the book appear clearly as part of a larger political project which entailed a re-evaluation of the prevailing social order. What Lepp nen shows in Elin W gner's Alarm Clock is that the debate on matriarchy in the 1920s and 1930s was much stronger and vital than has been known before. And that this position, often characterised negatively as "essentialism" in modern feminist terms, was, in fact, functional and strongly emancipatory in its time and context. Elin W gner's Alarm Clock is a good contribution to the complex history of European feminism.
By reading Elin W gner s V ckarklocka in an European context, rather than a purely Swedish context, which is often done, many of the ideas of the book appear clearly as part of a larger political project which entailed a re-evaluation of the prevailing social order. What Lepp nen shows in Elin W gner's Alarm Clock is that the debate on matriarchy in the 1920s and 1930s was much stronger and vital than has been known before. And that this position, often characterised negatively as essentialism in modern feminist terms, was, in fact, functional and strongly emancipatory in its time and context. Elin W gner's Alarm Clock is a good contribution to the complex history of European feminism...
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2008
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Summaries
Main Description
Elin Wagner's Alarm Clock analyzes the ideas of the Swedish journalist, feminist, and literary author Elin Wagner (1882-1949), as conveyed in her book Vackarklocka (1941), which Katarina Leppanen places in a European feminist context. Vackarklocka was part of the European feminist debate on matriarchy in the 1920s and 1930s, which aimed to strengthen women's position and confidence as political citizens by providing them with a historical past where women ruled. This reinvented past revitalized the emergence or eternity of patriarchy and offered an alternative to the prevailing order. In this reevaluation of Vackarklocka, Leppanen has established this important Swedish novel as a text central to the development of the feminist movement. Elin Wagner's Alarm Clock is a book suitable for students of Swedish literature and European feminism. Book jacket.
Long Description
This book analyses the ideas of the Swedish journalist, feminist, and literary author Elin W gner (1882-1949), as conveyed in her book V ckarklocka (1941), in a European feminist context. This context is presented in terms of three elements. Firstly, the German sociologist/educationalist Mathilde Vaerting and her sociology of power played an important role in W gner's development of a theory of matriarchy. Secondly, the influence of the Austrian feminist Rosa Mayreder and her theory of masculine civilization and feminine culture are analyzed in relation to W gner's development of what might be called an early ecological feminism. Thirdly, the mainly unknown Women's Organization for World Order (WOWO) is presented. 0s and 1930s, which wanted to strengthen women's position and confidence as political citizens by providing them with a historical past where women ruled (matriarchy). Thereby they not only reinvented a past, but also revitalized the emergence or eternity of patriarchy. These women discussed the possibility of women offering an alternative to the prevailing order. A special analysis is made of Mayreder's and W gner's way of discussing what woman is and in what ways she can challenge the system. Both argued that women ought to have the same rights and duties as men, but that this should not require them to adapt to the distorted male system. This study argues that this position, easily characterized as "essentialist" in modern feminist terms, is in fact functional and strongly emancipatory in its time and context. In this reevaluation of V ckarklocka Katarina Lepp nen has established this important Swedish novel as a text central to the development of the feminist movement. Elin W gner's Alarm Clock is a book suitable for students of Swedish Literature and European Feminism.
Long Description
In what way did ecological feminist thinking contribute to feminist criticism of the prevailing social order during the interwar period? This book shows how ecology was part of both matriarchalist and political feminist thinking in the period.
Long Description
This book analyses the ideas of the Swedish journalist, feminist, and literary author Elin Wägner (1882-1949), as conveyed in her book Väckarklocka (1941), in a European feminist context. This context is presented in terms of three elements. Firstly, the German sociologist/educationalist Mathilde Vaerting and her sociology of power played an important role in Wägner's development of a theory of matriarchy. Secondly, the influence of the Austrian feminist Rosa Mayreder and her theory of masculine civilization and feminine culture are analyzed in relation to Wägner's development of what might be called an early ecological feminism. Thirdly, the mainly unknown Women's Organization for World Order (WOWO) is presented. 0s and 1930s, which wanted to strengthen women's position and confidence as political citizens by providing them with a historical past where women ruled (matriarchy). Thereby they not only reinvented a past, but also revitalized the emergence or eternity of patriarchy. These women discussed the possibility of women offering an alternative to the prevailing order. A special analysis is made of Mayreder's and Wägner's way of discussing what woman is and in what ways she can challenge the system. Both argued that women ought to have the same rights and duties as men, but that this should not require them to adapt to the distorted male system. This study argues that this position, easily characterized as "essentialist" in modern feminist terms, is in fact functional and strongly emancipatory in its time and context. In this reevaluation of Väckarklocka Katarina Leppänen has established this important Swedish novel as a text central to the development of the feminist movement. Elin Wägner's Alarm Clock is a book suitable for students of Swedish Literature and European Feminism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Movements
Alarm Clock for the Age and the Movementp. 17
History
Matriarchy and J. J. Bachofenp. 53
Toward a Feminist Politicsp. 67
Civilization and Nature
Is Civilization Unnatural?p. 93
Earth and the Environmentp. 115
Women
Woman as Alternativep. 147
Re:Fwd: feminismsp. 183
Women's Organisation for World Orderp. 215
Bibliographyp. 227
Indexp. 239
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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