Catalogue


Before the killing fields : witness to Cambodia and the Vietnam War /
Leslie Fielding.
imprint
London ; New York : I.B. Tauris, 2008.
description
xxxii, 261 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1845114930, 9781845114930
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : I.B. Tauris, 2008.
isbn
1845114930
9781845114930
catalogue key
6327099
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [251]-256) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness
"This is a wonderfully entertaining read and hugely germane to many of our present preoccupations in International Relations." -- Chris Patten , Lord Patten of Barnes "Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness "Written with panache and verve, weaving history with biography, anecdote with serious commentary on international relations, Before the Killing Fields is a joy to read."-- Robert H.Taylor,Asian Affairs ''Fielding is clearly no shrinking violet or he probably could not have achieved his mission of not only reconstructing the embassy, but also reconstructing the UK's relations with Cambodia...Fielding reminds us of a seemingly lost world of good fun but also serious thought and action. It would be a great shame if the world he describes is lost for ever.'' Robert H. Taylor,Book Review- Southeast Asia
"This is a wonderfully entertaining read and hugely germane to many of our present preoccupations in International Relations." -- Chris Patten, Lord Patten of Barnes "Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness "Written with panache and verve, weaving history with biography, anecdote with serious commentary on international relations, Before the Killing Fields is a joy to read."-- Robert H.Taylor, Asian Affairs ''Fielding is clearly no shrinking violet or he probably could not have achieved his mission of not only reconstructing the embassy, but also reconstructing the UK's relations with Cambodia...Fielding reminds us of a seemingly lost world of good fun but also serious thought and action. It would be a great shame if the world he describes is lost for ever.'' Robert H. Taylor, Book Review- Southeast Asia
"This is a wonderfully entertaining read and hugely germane to many of our present preoccupations in International Relations." -- Chris Patten , Lord Patten of Barnes "Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness "Written with panache and verve, weaving history with biography, anecdote with serious commentary on international relations, Before the Killing Fields is a joy to read."-- Robert H.Taylor, Asian Affairs ''Fielding is clearly no shrinking violet or he probably could not have achieved his mission of not only reconstructing the embassy, but also reconstructing the UK's relations with Cambodia...Fielding reminds us of a seemingly lost world of good fun but also serious thought and action. It would be a great shame if the world he describes is lost for ever.'' Robert H. Taylor, Book Review- Southeast Asia
"This is a wonderfully entertaining read and hugely germane to many of our present preoccupations in International Relations."--Chris Patten,Lord Patten of Barnes "Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness
"This is a wonderfully entertaining read and hugely germane to many of our present preoccupations in International Relations." "--" Chris Patten," "Lord Patten of Barnes "Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness
'This is a wonderfully entertaining read and hugely germane to many of our present preoccupations in International Relations.'""""" --"""""" Chris Patten (Lord Patten of Barnes)" "Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness
'This is a wonderfully entertaining read and hugely germane to many of our present preoccupations in International Relations.'--Chris Patten (Lord Patten of Barnes) "Leslie Fielding's book is at once a perceptive account of Cambodia at a critical juncture in its modern history, an instructive insider's story of diplomatic management and a revealingly honest personal memoir. With his capacity to combine these themes in a seamless fashion, he has given his readers an eminently readable insight into life in Cambodia before tragedy washed over that ancient kingdom." -- Milton Osborne, Adjunct Professor of Asian Studies, Australian National University and author of Sihanouk: Prince of Light, Prince of Darkness
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Before the Killing Fields is a gripping portrait of a country poised between peace and war. In the mid 1960s, Cambodia's position was highly vulnerable. Caught between the Americans embroiled in the Vietnam war and the Viet Cong gaining control over Cambodian frontier areas, the Cambodian government wanted nothing more than to preserve their neutrality. When Leslie Fielding arrived in Phnom Penh, the Cambodians were rioting and attacking the American and British Embassies. Yet against this grim and dramatic backdrop, the daily round of international foreign policy somehow had to continue. From diplomatic meetings conducted in opium dens and dancing lessons with beautiful princesses at the Royal Palace to candid portraits of the rest of the international community of Phnom Penh, Before the Killing Fields is an illuminating insight into a lost world.
Main Description
A gripping portrait of a country poised between peace and war. In the mid-1960s, Cambodia's position within South East Asia was highly vulnerable. The Americans were embroiled in war in Vietnam, the Viet Cong were gaining clandestine control over Cambodian frontier areas, while the Cambodian government - under the leadership of a charming but difficult Head of State, Prince Norodom Sihanouk - wanted nothing more than to preserve their neutrality and keep out of the war. Highly distrustful of any perceived foreign interference, the Cambodians had even rioted and attacked the American and British Embassies in Phnom Penh and their debris was still strewn on the streets when Leslie Fielding arrived in the city. Yet against this grim and dramatic backdrop, the daily round of international foreign policy somehow had to continue and Before the Killing Fields offers a compelling and fascinating account of how this was achieved. As well as a political history this is also a portrait of an exotic but overlooked country at a critical stage in its development. Violence, intrigue and even the supernatural mingle with issues of day-to-day management and office morale. From diplomatic meetings conducted in opium dens and dancing lessons with beautiful princesses at the Royal Palace to candid portraits of the rest of the international community of Phnom Penh, Before the Killing Fields is an illuminating insight into a lostworld.
Description for Bookstore
Before the Killing Fieldsis a gripping portrait of a country poised between peace and war. In the mid 1960s, Cambodia's position was highly vulnerable. Caught between the Americans embroiled in the Vietnam war and the Viet Cong gaining control over Cambodian frontier areas, the Cambodian government wanted nothing more than to preserve their neutrality. When Leslie Fielding arrived in Phnom Penh, the Cambodians were rioting and attacking the American and British Embassies. Yet against this grim and dramatic backdrop, the daily round of international foreign policy somehow had to continue. From diplomatic meetings conducted in opium dens and dancing lessons with beautiful princesses at the Royal Palace to candid portraits of the rest of the international community of Phnom Penh,Before the Killing Fieldsis an illuminating insight into a lost world.
Long Description
A gripping portrait of a country poised between peace and war. In the mid-1960s, Cambodia's position within South East Asia was highly vulnerable. The Americans were embroiled in war in Vietnam, the Viet Cong were gaining clandestine control over Cambodian frontier areas, while the Cambodian government - under the leadership of a charming but difficult Head of State, Prince Norodom Sihanouk - wanted nothing more than to preserve their neutrality and keep out of the war. Highly distrustful of any perceived foreign interference, the Cambodians had even rioted and attacked the American and British Embassies in Phnom Penh and their debris was still strewn on the streets when Leslie Fielding arrived in the city. Yet against this grim and dramatic backdrop, the daily round of international foreign policy somehow had to continue and Before the Killing Fields offers a compelling and fascinating account of how this was achieved. As well as a political history this is also a portrait of an exotic but overlooked country at a critical stage in its development. Violence, intrigue and even the supernatural mingle with issues of day-to-day management and office morale. From diplomatic meetings conducted in opium dens and dancing lessons with beautiful princesses at the Royal Palace to candid portraits of the rest of the international community of Phnom Penh, Before the Killing Fields is an illuminating insight into a lost world.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Forewordp. ix
Introductionp. xii
Figures in Relief - Four Cambodian Cameos
Mob at the Chancery Gatesp. xvii
The Number One Twisterp. xxv
Chez Madame Chhump. xxix
Friendly Firep. xxxi
The Prelude
One-Way Ticket to 'Phnompers'p. 3
The Place and the People
Travellers to an Antique Landp. 15
Cambodia in the Sixties - The Quest for Securityp. 35
Re-Organising the Embassy
Starting Again, From Scratchp. 51
Labour and Leisure, New-Stylep. 67
Learning to be an 'Ambassador'p. 81
Taking Diplomatic Action
The Tribes are Restlessp. 95
The Approach to Geneva - Chou En-lai's Road Blockp. 101
Patrick Gordon Walker and the Peace Process - The Scene on the Streetp. 107
The Coming of the Viet Congp. 119
The Paper Chasep. 129
Bilateral Relations - The Diplomacy of Small Thingsp. 137
Other Kids on the Block
Cheshire Cat Chinesep. 149
Feudal Frenchp. 161
Ugly Americansp. 175
Bonzer Australiansp. 183
Goodbye to All That
Feelings in Retrospectp. 191
The Prince in Perspectivep. 201
The 'Crocodile Princess' in Remembrancep. 215
Cambodian Coda
The Crashp. 223
Epilogue on Indo-Chinap. 231
Confidential Annex - Not the Secret Servicep. 241
Chronologyp. 247
Select Bibliographyp. 251
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem