Catalogue


Thinking beyond war : civil-military relations and why America fails to win the peace /
Isaiah Wilson III.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2007.
description
xxx, 308 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
140398199X (alk. paper), 9781403981998
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2007.
isbn
140398199X (alk. paper)
9781403981998
contents note
The paradox of the American way of war and peace -- Modern war revisited : three generations of modern war-fare -- The dawn of the postmodern age of war -- On planning : a new methodology for postmodern war-fare -- The liberation and reconstruction of northern Iraq -- Patronage politics in northern Iraq : the case of tribal engagement in northern Iraq, June 2003-March 2004 -- My Iraq war : a postscript -- Whither Mosul? : the story of transition failure and the rise and fall of northern Iraq -- Fighting to change, changing to fight : the lessons of Iraq on army transformation, "under construction"-- Educating holistic warriors.
catalogue key
6324722
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Lt. Col. Isaiah (Ike) Wilson III, USA, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-06-01:
Wilson (US Military Academy, West Point) offers both autobiography and constructivist critique of the way the US intervenes militarily. Contemporary scholars of foreign policy and military-political affairs have been wrestling with when war begins and ends; Wilson instead offers a redefinition of what war is. This new concept of war and peace--holistic war--denies past considerations of an antithetical relationship between war and peace and the separate functions of war and peace. Driven by his own experiences as an Army officer and a policy scholar, Wilson offers a new alternative to thinking about the military as a tool of power, war termination, and the interplay of foreign policy and military intervention. By observing the paradox of the American way of waging war and settling peace Wilson offers scholars a fresh way of thinking about the relationship between military and political objectives. Finally, Wilson uses his on-the-ground experiences in Iraq to provide readers an Airborne Division planner's perspective on Iraq in the first year after the invasion. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate and research collections. D. S. Reveron Naval War College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Lieutenant Colonel Isaiah 'Ike' Wilson III is one of the brightest strategic thinkers in the U.S. army. As a soldier-scholar he has both served in Iraq and astutely examined what went wrong--and sometimes right. In Thinking beyond War he offers us the fruit of years of first-hand study and careful analysis. He urges the U.S. military to get beyond its narrow focus on winning battles and to think more broadly about how to convert battlefield success into long-term political victories. Thinking beyond War offers an invaluable guide to thinking about these difficult yet vitally important issues." --Max Boot, senior fellow in national security studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of War Made New and The Savage Wars of Peace
"Lieutenant Colonel Isaiah 'Ike' Wilson III is one of the brightest strategic thinkers in the U.S. army. As a soldier-scholar he has both served in Iraq and astutely examined what went wrongÂ--and sometimes right. InThinking beyond Warhe offers us the fruit of years of first-hand study and careful analysis. He urges the U.S. military to get beyond its narrow focus on winning battles and to think more broadly about how to convert battlefield success into long-term political victories.Thinking beyond Waroffers an invaluable guide to thinking about these difficult yet vitally important issues." --Max Boot, senior fellow in national security studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and author ofWar Made NewandThe Savage Wars of Peace
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Wilson argues that one major reason for America's propensity to 'lose the peace' is the way the nation defines war and how the United States military is currently organized for warfare.
Main Description
Why was there a deliberate plan to fight the war in Iraq but none to win the peace? This question, which has caused such confusion and consternation among the American public and been the subject of much political wrangling over the past two years, is the focus of Lt. Col. Isaiah Wilson's investigation. Director of the American politics, policy, and strategy program at West Point, Wilson points to a flaw in the government's definition of when, how, and for what reasons the United States intervenes abroad. It is a paradox in the American way of peace and war, he explains, that harkens back to America's war loss in Vietnam. The dilemma we face today in Iraq, the author says, is the result of a flaw in how we have viewed the war from its inception, and Wilson reminds us that Iraq is just the latest, albeit the most poignant and tragic, case in point. His exploration of this paradox calls for new organizational and operational approaches to America's intervention policy. In challenging current western societal military lexicon and doctrine, Wilson offers new hope and practical solutions to overcome the paradox once and for all.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Author's Note #1p. xi
Author's Note #2p. xv
Prefacep. xix
Acknowledgmentsp. xxix
Beyond Warp. 1
The Paradox of the American Way of War and Peacep. 3
Modern War Revisited: Three Generations of Modern War-Farep. 21
The Dawn of the Postmodern Age of Warp. 35
On Planning: A New Methodology for Postmodern War-Farep. 59
Lessons in Postmodern War: Civil-Military Operations in Northern Iraqp. 95
The Liberation and Reconstruction of Northern Iraqp. 97
Patronage Politics in Northern Iraq: The Case of Tribal Engagement in Northern Iraq, June 2003-March 2004p. 115
Lessons Gathered but Not Yet Learnedp. 149
My Iraq War: A Postscriptp. 151
Whither Mosul? The Story of Transition Failure and the Rise and Fall of Northern Iraqp. 173
Past as Prologuep. 199
Fighting to Change, Changing to Fight: The Lessons of Iraq on Army Transformation, Under Constructionp. 201
Educating Holistic Warriorsp. 229
Epilogue: No More Iraqs?p. 253
Note on Sourcesp. 261
Notesp. 269
Indexp. 291
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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