Catalogue


The medieval heritage of Mexico /
by Luis Weckmann ; translated by Frances M. López-Morillas.
imprint
New York : Fordham University Press, 1992.
description
vii, 692 p.
ISBN
0823213242
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Fordham University Press, 1992.
isbn
0823213242
general note
Translation of: Herencia medieval de México.
catalogue key
631653
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [617]-677) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-08:
A well-known historian, Weckmann is a specialist in medieval Mexican history; author of La Sociedad Feudal (1944); editor of the papers of Empress Carlota, Consort of Maxmilian; and a prominent member of the Mexican diplomatic corps. This scholarly work is a comprehensive account that draws on social and cultural topics from 1517 to the 1650s, when administrators, judges, and bishops introduced to the New World a culture that was essentially medieval. Significant points are the persistence of medieval institutions in Spain (more enduring than elsewhere in Europe); the full range of Spanish influence, including Moorish cultural patterns; and imprints from the Middle Ages seen in Mexican institutions today. Well organized and readable, this is an important addition to the work on Mexico in English. Highly recommended for academic libraries and all collections on Mexico.-- Margaret W. Norton, formerly with Fenwick H.S., Oak Park, Ill. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 1993-01:
Weckmann, a scholar-diplomat, has at last brought into print a comprehensive collection of findings on the ideas, customs, practices, cultural expressions, and institutions of medieval origin introduced by Spain into its colonies. A relentless focus on medieval influences suffuses the work, from the preconceptions that lay behind the voyages of discovery and conquest (Pt. 1); to the imposition of Spanish religious, political, and economic institutions (Pts. 2 and 3); through a final section on transmitted medieval traits affecting society, culture, and the legal system. The huge scope of this study encompassing New Spain in its broadest geographical sense over a period roughly from 1517 to 1650 makes it impossible to identify comparable works. Certainly, much is owed conceptually to such earlier proponents of medieval continuity as Sanchez Albornoz, Menendez Pidol, Ots Capdequi, Frederici, and Verlinden, as well as to the more contemporary efforts of Zavala, Miranda, Foster, Liss, and others. As a descriptive compendium of this vast subject, the work is unparalleled. Exhaustive bibliography of primary and secondary sources; extensive footnotes. Undergraduate; graduate; faculty. K. Kennelly; Mount St. Mary's College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, August 1992
Choice, January 1993
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Summaries
Main Description
The Medieval Heritage of Mexico is the result of more than thirty yearsÆ intensive research. This work examines, more thoroughly than any other, the medieval legacy that influences life in Spanish-speaking North America to the present day. Focusing on the period from 1517ùthe expedition of Hernandez de Cordobaùto the middle of the seventeenth century, Weckmann describes how explorers, administrators, judges, and clergy introduced to the New World a culture that was essentially medieval. This culture was, in some respects, a floweringùa rebirth, evenùof the ideals and institutions of medieval Europe, at a time when Europe itself was in the throes of the religious, political, and cultural upheavals of the early modern period. That the transplanted culture differentiated itself from that of Spain is due to the resistance of the indigenous cultures of Mexico.
Main Description
The Medieval Heritage of Mexico is the result of more than thirty years' intensive research. This work examines, more thoroughly than any other, the medieval legacy that influences life in Spanish-speaking North America to the present day. Focusing on the period from 1517 - the expedition ofHernandez de Cordoba - to the middle of the seventeenth century, Weckmann describes how explorers, administrators, judges, and clergy introduced to the New World a culture that was essentially medieval. This culture was, in some respects, a flowering - a rebirth, even - of the ideals andinstitutions of medieval Europe, at a time when Europe itself was in the throes of the religious, political, and cultural upheavals of the early modern period. That the transplanted culture differentiated itself from that of Spain is due to the resistance of the indigenous cultures of Mexico.
Main Description
The Medieval Heritage of Mexico is the result of more than thirty years' intensive research. This work examines, more thoroughly than any other, the medieval legacy that influences life in Spanish-speaking North America to the present day. Focusing on the period from 1517--the expedition of Hernandez de Cordoba--to the middle of the seventeenth century, Weckmann describes how explorers, administrators, judges, and clergy introduced to the New World a culture that was essentially medieval. This culture was, in some respects, a flowering--a rebirth, even--of the ideals and institutions of medieval Europe, at a time when Europe itself was in the throes of the religious, political, and cultural upheavals of the early modern period. That the transplanted culture differentiated itself from that of Spain is due to the resistance of the indigenous cultures of Mexico.
Unpaid Annotation
The Medieval Heritage of Mexico is the result of more than thirty yearsÆ intensive research. This work examines, more thoroughly than any other, the medieval legacy that influences life in Spanish-speaking North America to the present day. Focusing on the
Unpaid Annotation
With meticulous detail, the author brings to life the colorful pageant of early Spanish Mexico and its remarkable characters. An extensive bibliography provides access to the original source documents and chronicles as well as to the scholarship of modern researchers.

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