Catalogue


What Orwell didn't know : propaganda and the new face of American politics /
edited by András Szántó ; with an introduction by Orville Schell.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : PublicAffairs, c2007.
description
xxxi, 236 p.
ISBN
1586485601 (pbk.), 9781586485603 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : PublicAffairs, c2007.
isbn
1586485601 (pbk.)
9781586485603 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6309554
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, November 2007
Guardian UK, February 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Manipulation. Bias. Spin. Dishonesty. Half a century after George Orwell's death and six decades after his classic essay, "Politics and the English Language"-in which he tied the corrosion of language to the corruption of politics-American public life is riddled with the symptoms of obfuscation and doublespeak Orwell so vividly diagnosed. A Big Brother-style dystopia has not come to pass, but tools are available to spinmeisters and image-makers that allow them to detach politics from reality on a daily basis. Twenty prominent voices consider the outlooks for reality-based politics in this anthology. From the use of deceptively murky jargon, to the emotional pull of phrases like the "War on Terror," to the rise of infotainment and pseudo-science, to the disinclination of big media to provide real news, these writers address unsettling developments In today's public discourse. Reflecting on Orwell, they shed new light on the power of politicians and the media to deceive and to repair, to fracture and to unite American democracy. Book jacket.
Main Description
Propaganda. Manipulation. Spin. Control. It has ever been thus--or has it? On the eve of the 60th anniversary of George Orwell's classic essay on propaganda ( Politics and the English Language ), writers have been invited to explore what Orwell didn't--or couldn't--know. Their responses, framed in pithy, focused essays, range far and wide: from the effect of television and computing, to the vast expansion of knowledge about how our brains respond to symbolic messages, to the merger of journalism and entertainment, to lessons learned during and after a half-century of totalitarianism. Together, they paint a portrait of a political culture in which propaganda and mind control are alive and well (albeit in forms and places that would have surprised Orwell). The pieces in this anthology sound alarm bells about the manipulation and misinformation in today's politics, and offer guideposts for a journalism attuned to Orwellian tendencies in the 21st century.
Main Description
Propaganda. Manipulation. Spin. Control. It has ever been thusor has it? On the eve of the 60th anniversary of George Orwell's classic essay on propaganda (Politics and the English Language), writers have been invited to explore what Orwell didn'tor couldn'tknow. Their responses, framed in pithy, focused essays, range far and wide: from the effect of television and computing, to the vast expansion of knowledge about how our brains respond to symbolic messages, to the merger of journalism and entertainment, to lessons learned during and after a half-century of totalitarianism. Together, they paint a portrait of a political culture in which propaganda and mind control are alive and well (albeit in forms and places that would have surprised Orwell). The pieces in this anthology sound alarm bells about the manipulation and misinformation in today's politics, and offer guideposts for a journalism attuned to Orwellian tendencies in the 21st century.
Main Description
Propaganda. Manipulation. Spin. . It has ever been thus--or has it? On the eve of the 60th anniversary of George Orwell's classic essay on propaganda ( 'Politics and the English Language' ), writers have been invited to explore what Orwell didn't--or couldn't--know. Their responses, framed in pithy, focused essays, range far and wide: from the effect of television and computing, to the vast expansion of knowledge about how our brains respond to symbolic messages, to the merger of journalism and entertainment, to lessons learned during and after a half-century of totalitarianism. Together, they paint a portrait of a political culture in which propaganda and mind are alive and well (albeit in forms and places that would have surprised Orwell). The pieces in this anthology sound alarm bells about the manipulation and misinformation in today's politics, and offer guideposts for a journalism attuned to Orwellian tendencies in the 21st century.
Table of Contents
Editor's Notep. ix
Introduction: Follies of Orthodoxyp. xvii
Language and Politics
Orwell Then and Nowp. 3
The Limits of Languagep. 9
Words in a Time of War: On Rhetoric, Truth, and Powerp. 16
An Egregious Collocation of Vocablesp. 37
Freedom, Liberty, and Rights: Three Cautionary Talesp. 49
Sloppiness and the English Languagep. 57
Symbols and Battlegrounds
What Orwell Didn't Know About the Brain, the Mind, and Languagep. 67
The New Frontier: The Instruments of Emotionp. 75
Stellar Spinp. 87
Bad Knowledgep. 97
Black and White, or Gray: A Polish Conundrump. 110
After the Falwelliansp. 122
Media and Message
Welcome to the Infotainment Freak Showp. 137
Neither Snow, Nor Rain, Nor Heat, Nor Gloom of Night Will Stay the Couriers from the Swift Completion of Their Appointed Rounds-but What About Big Media?p. 147
Reporters and Rhetoricp. 158
Lessons from the War Zonep. 166
Our Own Thought Policep. 174
Epilogue: What I Didn't Know: Open Society Reconsideredp. 187
Politics and the English Languagep. 205
Notesp. 223
Author Biographiesp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem