Catalogue


The dog says how /
Kevin Kling.
imprint
St. Paul, MN : Borealis Books, c2007.
description
178 p.
ISBN
0873515994 (alk. paper), 9780873515993 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
St. Paul, MN : Borealis Books, c2007.
isbn
0873515994 (alk. paper)
9780873515993 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6290440
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Minnesota Book Awards, USA, 2008 : Nominated
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2008-10-27:
Kling's short but sweet recording is a collection of autobiographical tales relating events of his past with an ear for everyday themes such as friendship, death and disability. His writing is earnest but real and often hilarious; his reading follows suit. The self-deprecating Kling is always looking to draw a laugh from his listeners, but never ignores the message behind each tale. Listeners of all ages will find themselves lured into Kling's ceaselessly funny tales as he expounds on everything from taxidermy to wearing socks with sandals just to annoy people. A Borealis Books hardcover (reviewed online). (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2007-11-01:
As a playwright (Fear and Loving in Minneapolis), humorist, and commentator on National Public Radio's All Things Considered, Kling is well known for his ability to find comedy in whatever life sends his way, first a birth defect, then a motorcycle accident that has limited his use of both arms. The title piece in this debut collection refers to a fight between Kling's cat and dog that causes his voice-activated computer software to respond by typing "How, how, why, why." Many of these 29 autobiographical tales recount childhood escapades with his father as they flew model airplanes or traveled on family car trips. "Dad's Day" shares the mixed-up phrases a neighbor, Mr. Sloan, creates to dispense wisdom, e.g., "It ain't rocket surgery, for crying outside." With Kling's frequent childhood visits to the emergency room, his father offered this wise instruction as Kling went on wild go-cart rides: "Don't get killed just because you know how." The tales range from a long line of family members who have survived lightning strikes to a third-generation farmer who decides to plant a field of sunflowers because he knows he will never be able to afford a Van Gogh. Recommended for all Minnesota libraries and for literary collections in larger public libraries.-Joyce Sparrow, JWB Children's Services Council, Pinellas Park, FL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
PW Annex Reviews, October 2007
Library Journal, November 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Kevin Kling, best known for his popular commentaries on National Public Radio's All Things Considered and his storytelling stage shows like Tales from the Charred Underbelly of the Yule Log, delivers hilarious, often tender stories to readers everywhere with his first book, The Dog Says How. Kling's autobiographical tales are as enchanting as they are true to life: hopping freight trains, getting hit by lightning, performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia, growing up in Minnesota, and eating things before knowing what they are. In 'Circus Tale', Kling recollects how his love of boats, animals, and adventure inspired him to join a travelling circus troupe -- but it was the all-you-can-eat buffets that cinched the deal. In 'Hockey Hair', Kling spots old pals from his hometown who sport mullet-like haircuts, spurring him to unlock doors to his past. In the comical yet poignant title story, Kling straddles the world of the ordinary and one rivalling Dante's inferno as he learns how to use voice-recognition software after a motorcycle accident.
Main Description
In this wonderfully original collection of autobiographical stories, popular storyteller and NPR commentator Kevin Kling deftly weaves pitch-perfect scenes of childhood antics and adulthood absurdities with themes of overcoming tragedy, forging lifelong friendships, and living with disabilities in a complex world. In "Circus," Kling recollects how his love of boats, animals and adventure inspired him to join a traveling circus troupe-but it was the all-you-can-eat buffet that cinched the deal. In "Dogs," Fafnir, Kling's new wiener puppy, leads him into the world of show dogs, those resembling "cleaning implements-perfumed, powdered, and pampered." In the poignant title story, Kling straddles the realm of the ordinary and one rivaling Dante's underworld as he learns how to use voice-recognition software after his near fatal motorcycle accident. These and many more classic and never-before-told tales are collected in The Dog Says How . In Kling's universe, "the mundane becomes magical, the fantastic becomes accessible and through it all his profound sense of curiosity about the world transforms the everyday to the timeless" ( Queen Anne News ). Kevin Kling is a well-known playwright and storyteller, and his commentaries can be heard on NPR's All Things Considered . His plays and adaptations have been performed around the world. He lives in Minneapolis.
Main Description
Kevin Kling, best known for his popular commentaries on National Public Radio'sAll Things Consideredand his storytelling stage shows likeTales from the Charred Underbelly of the Yule Log, delivers hilarious, often tender stories to readers everywhere with his first book,The Dog Says How.Kling's autobiographical tales are as enchanting as they are true to life: hopping freight trains, getting hit by lightning, performing his banned play in Czechoslovakia, growing up in Minnesota, and eating things before knowing what they are. In "Circus Tale," Kling recollects how his love of boats, animals, and adventure inspired him to join a traveling circus troupe-but it was the all-you-can-eat buffets that cinched the deal. In "Hockey Hair," Kling spots old pals from his hometown who sport mullet-like haircuts, spurring him to unlock doors to his past. In the comical yet poignant title story, Kling straddles the world of the ordinary and one rivaling Dante's inferno as he learns how to use voice-recognition software after a motorcycle accident. In Kling's classic and never-before-told stories, "the mundane becomes magical, the fantastic becomes accessible and through it all his profound sense of curiosity about the world transforms the everyday to the timeless" (Queen Anne News, Seattle). Kevin Klingis a well-known playwright and storyteller, and his commentaries can be heard on NPR'sAll Things Considered. His plays and adaptations have been performed around the world. He lives in Minneapolis.
Long Description
In this wonderfully original collection of autobiographical stories, popular storyteller and NPR commentator Kevin Kling deftly weaves pitch-perfect scenes of childhood antics and adulthood absurdities with themes of overcoming tragedy, forging lifelong friendships, and living with disabilities in a complex world. In "Circus," Kling recollects how his love of boats, animals and adventure inspired him to join a traveling circus troupe--but it was the all-you-can-eat buffet that cinched the deal. In "Dogs," Fafnir, Kling's new wiener puppy, leads him into the world of show dogs, those resembling "cleaning implements--perfumed, powdered, and pampered." In the poignant title story, Kling straddles the realm of the ordinary and one rivaling Dante's underworld as he learns how to use voice-recognition software after his near fatal motorcycle accident. These and many more classic and never-before-told tales are collected in "The Dog Says How," In Kling's universe, "the mundane becomes magical, the fantastic becomes accessible and through it all his profound sense of curiosity about the world transforms the everyday to the timeless" ("Queen Anne News"). Kevin Kling is a well-known playwright and storyteller, and his commentaries can be heard on NPR's "All Things Considered," His plays and adaptations have been performed around the world. He lives in Minneapolis.
Main Description
In this wonderfully original collection of autobiographical stories, popular storyteller and NPR commentator Kevin Kling deftly weaves pitch-perfect scenes of childhood antics and adulthood absurdities with themes of overcoming tragedy, forging lifelong friendships, and living with disabilities in a complex world. In “Circus,” Kling recollects how his love of boats, animals and adventure inspired him to join a traveling circus troupe-but it was the all-you-can-eat buffet that cinched the deal. In “Dogs,” Fafnir, Kling’s new wiener puppy, leads him into the world of show dogs, those resembling “cleaning implements-perfumed, powdered, and pampered.” In the poignant title story, Kling straddles the realm of the ordinary and one rivaling Dante’s underworld as he learns how to use voice-recognition software after his near fatal motorcycle accident. These and many more classic and never-before-told tales are collected in The Dog Says How . In Kling’s universe, “the mundane becomes magical, the fantastic becomes accessible and through it all his profound sense of curiosity about the world transforms the everyday to the timeless” ( Queen Anne News ). Kevin Kling is a well-known playwright and storyteller, and his commentaries can be heard on NPR’s All Things Considered . His plays and adaptations have been performed around the world. He lives in Minneapolis.
Table of Contents
On a motorbikep. 3
Accidentp. 5
MD carnivalp. 11
Dogsp. 15
Beaver in a boxp. 21
Larryp. 27
Taxidermyp. 29
Lightningp. 37
Daddylandp. 41
Dad's dayp. 47
View from the card tablep. 51
Drive-inp. 63
Mom's pursep. 67
Snow dayp. 73
Marching bandp. 79
Nutcrackerp. 87
Circusp. 95
Czechp. 103
Fearp. 113
"Dick"p. 119
Perceptionp. 125
Australiap. 129
My brother's bachelor partyp. 135
If it's morphine it must be augustp. 141
Prayerp. 147
The giftp. 153
Racing toward solacep. 159
Riop. 169
The dog says howp. 175
Acknowledgmentsp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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