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America's second revolution : how George Washington defeated Patrick Henry and saved the nation /
Harlow Giles Unger.
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons, c2007.
description
xvi, 269 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0470107510 (cloth : acid-free paper), 9780470107515 (cloth : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons, c2007.
isbn
0470107510 (cloth : acid-free paper)
9780470107515 (cloth : acid-free paper)
catalogue key
6284515
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-257) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The Declaration of Independence liberated one continent from domination by another, but the Constitution revolutionized the world-by entrusting citizens with rights never before in history granted to ordinary people. Far from the genteel unity implied by the Constitution's opening words "We the People, " the struggle to create and ratify this powerful document was a s difficult as the fight for independence from Britain had been. The road to independence had led straight to hell. America was ablaze in anarchy and civil strife. As civil war threatened, George Washington called for a new constitution creating a powerful new federal government to restore order. For the majority of American's the new Constitution drafted in Philadelphia seemed a disaster, crating a new American government with the same powers of taxation as the former British government and led by a president with powers to succeed himself indefinitely and become a monarch. Former Virginia governor Patrick Henry cried out against such a central authority that could stifle state sovereignty:"Liberty will be lost and tyranny will result." George Washington countered, calling Henry an enemy of liberty. The ratification process began and, over the next nine months, America warred with itself, as each state joined in what became American's "second revolution." Just as the first revolution had brought Americans together, the second threatened to rip the nation apart, as Washington's Federalists battled Henry's Antifederalists. Mobs ran riot in the streets of Philadelphia, New York, and Providence. the wealthy elite supported the new Constitution and a strong central government, while a majority of ordinary people opposed both, and populist leaders such as Henry and New York governor George Clinton geared for violent conflict between the states to preserve state sovereignty. By mid-March 1788, eight of the nine states required for ratification of he Constitution had r4atified. but Virginia, the largest and the wealthiest state, stood firm with New York against union, and without them the new nation would be as fragile as the parchment on which the Constitution had been written. With the fate of the country in the balance, Washington could only hope for a miracle to save the nation from all-out civil war and disunion. In America's Second Revolution, award-winning author Harlow Giles Unger tells the gripping story of that miracle, the harrowing events that led up to it, and the men who made it possible,. Rich and powerful, they displayed humor, sarcasm, fire, brilliance, ignorance, hypocrisy, warmth, anger, bigotry, and hatred. Their struggle pitted friend against friend, brother against brother, father against son. but, in the end, they helped create a new government, a new nation, and, ultimately, a new civilization.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist, October 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
A gripping account of the Founding Fathers' dramatic-and often violent- struggle to ratify the Constitution and give birth to the nation America's Second Revolution recounts the drama, passions, and patriotic fervor behind one of the most crucial-and least known-political conflicts in American history. Award-winning author Harlow Giles Unger delves into neglected documents, diaries, and other primary sources to reveal the intense battle between George Washington's Federalists and Patrick Henry's diehard defenders of states' rights that determined the future of the country. Harlow Giles Unger (New York, NY) is author of 15 books, including the award-winning Lafayette (0-471-46885-1), John Hancock (0-471-33209-7), and The French War Against America (0-471-65113-3). A veteran journalist, he was an editor at the New York Herald Tribune Overseas News Service and a foreign correspondent for the Times and the Sunday Times of London.
Main Description
"Every American Interested in understanding the American character and the American past should read this book. There are vivid history lessons on almost every page. The constitution becomes not merely a brilliant blueprint for governance. It is-and was-also the only alternative to chaos. - Thomas Fleming, author of The Perils of Peace Acclaim for The Unexpected George Washington. "It's hard to imagine George Washington as playful, tender, or funny. But Harlow Unger searches to find these seldom-seen aspects of the private man, and the result is a fare more complete and believable founding father." - James C. Rees, Executive Director, Historic Mount Vernon "An intimate view of the American hero who managed to follow his ambitions to great power without being disdained for them." - Publishers Weekly
Main Description
Every American Interested in understanding the American character and the American past should read this book. There are vivid history lessons on almost every page. The constitution becomes not merely a brilliant blueprint for governance. It is-and was-also the only alternative to chaos. - Thomas Fleming, author of The Perils of Peace Acclaim for The Unexpected George Washington. It's hard to imagine George Washington as playful, tender, or funny. But Harlow Unger searches to find these seldom-seen aspects of the private man, and the result is a fare more complete and believable founding father." - James C. Rees, Executive Director, Historic Mount Vernon "An intimate view of the American hero who managed to follow his ambitions to great power without being disdained for them." - Publishers Weekly
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Chronologyp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Victory's Bitter Fruitsp. 5
The Great Debatep. 30
The Great Compromisep. 50
"The Seeds of Civil Discord"p. 73
The Road to Ratificationp. 91
"Unite or Die"p. 103
"Words to My Brother Ploughjoggers"p. 122
"A Fig and a Fiddle-stick's End"p. 138
The Language of Secessionp. 157
On the Wings of the Tempestp. 171
Birth of a Nationp. 184
One Nation, Divisible...p. 201
Proceedings of the Constitutional Conventionp. 213
The Constitution of the United Statesp. 213
Resolution of the Conventionp. 226
Letter of the Convention to Congressp. 227
Signers of the Constitutionp. 229
The Bill of Rightsp. 239
Notesp. 243
Bibliographyp. 255
Creditsp. 259
Indexp. 261
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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