Catalogue


The strange case of the Broad Street pump : John Snow and the mystery of cholera /
Sandra Hempel.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
description
viii, 321 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520250494 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520250499 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
uniform title
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.
isbn
0520250494 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520250499 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
A country holds its breath -- A desperate search -- It's here -- The surgeon's apprentice -- A London training -- A very peculiar man -- A shameful state of affairs -- A little light -- Sensation -- The grand experiment -- A plague on their houses -- The big idea -- Proof positive -- Euglenae and red cotton -- The verdicts -- End game.
general note
Originally published: The medical detective. London. Granta, 2006.
catalogue key
6278884
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-302) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Meticulously researched and with a sophisticated approach to history, this is also an exciting and compelling story. After reading it, I dreamt about being lost and scared at night in the filthy lanes of Victorian London."--Andrew Cunningham, Senior Research Fellow in History of Medicine, University of Cambridge "This book is one of those rare gems that thrills like fiction but is based on fact. It tells of the clear thought and quiet endeavour of a man who, without seeking honour or fame, persisted in overcoming prejudice and separating fact from fancy. john Snow discovered the way in which epidemic cholera was caught and nearly always killed us. By doing so he not only told the world how to prevent it, he laid the basis for the the prevention of all the world's medical ills--the science of epidemiology."--Dr. Mike Smith, Former NHS Director of Public Health (UK), and current 'resident' GP for Channel 5 News. "This vivid book about the victories of science over ignorance provides insight as we head towards the next epidemic."--Dr. Paul Volberding, Director of the Center for AIDS Research, University of California, San Francisco
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-07-01:
In this fascinating, well-written medical history, journalist and copywriter Hempel portrays the mysterious transmission of cholera in 1831 London. Although written at a level reflecting sound academic standards, this book relates a ripping yarn by demonstrating how the monklike physician John Snow alone--methodically, but insightfully--investigated how cholera proliferated through drinking water. Snow disregarded conventional medical wisdom while scientifically identifying the origin, conveyance, and contagious nature of the cholera pandemic. Still, this work is not for the faint of heart. In excruciating detail, Hempel recounts how the most vulnerable--in one poor unfortunate case, three-year-old William Somerville--underwent an alleged cure that was far more barbaric than the cholera itself (which might have cleared up on its own). However, the pandemic necessitated a scientific cure, since cholera bafflingly seized millions, from the squalor of Soho to the elite confines of the Royal Medical College and the Privy Council. Hempel is to be commended for writing a masterful, intriguing account of a historic plague, sprinkled with a vibrant cast offering instructive and timely insights for the current challenges of infectious diseases: malaria, yellow fever, and cholera. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels. G. M. Smith Delaware County Community College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
In 1831, an unknown, horrifying, and deadly disease from Asia swept across continental Europe and North America, killing millions and throwing the medical profession into confusion. A killer with little respect for class or wealth, cholera ravaged the squalid streets of Soho and rocked the great centers of Victorian power. In this gripping book, Sandra Hempel tells the story of John Snow, a reclusive doctor without money or social position, who--alone and unrecognized--had the genius to look beyond the conventional wisdom of his day and uncover the truth behind the pandemic. She describes how Snow discovered that cholera was spread through drinking water and how this subsequently laid the foundations for the modern, scientific investigation of today's fatal plagues. A dramatic account with a colorful cast of characters,The Strange Case of the Broad Street Pumpfeatures diversions into fascinating facets of medical and social history, such as Snow's tending of Queen Victoria in childbirth, Dutch microbiologist Leeuwenhoek's deliberate breeding of lice in his socks, Dickensian children's farms, and riotous nineteenth-century anesthesia parties. An afterword discusses the new threat of infectious diseases--including malaria, yellow fever, and cholera--with today's global warming. Copub: Granta
Long Description
In 1831, an unknown, horrifying, and deadly disease from Asia swept across continental Europe and North America, killing millions and throwing the medical profession into confusion. A killer with little respect for class or wealth, cholera ravaged the squalid streets of Soho and rocked the great centers of Victorian power. In this gripping book, Sandra Hempel tells the story of John Snow, a reclusive doctor without money or social position, who--alone and unrecognized--had the genius to look beyond the conventional wisdom of his day and uncover the truth behind the pandemic. She describes how Snow discovered that cholera was spread through drinking water and how this subsequently laid the foundations for the modern, scientific investigation of today's fatal plagues. A dramatic account with a colorful cast of characters, "The Strange Case of the Broad Street Pump "features diversions into fascinating facets of medical and social history, such as Snow's tending of Queen Victoria in childbirth, Dutch microbiologist Leeuwenhoek's deliberate breeding of lice in his socks, Dickensian children's farms, and riotous nineteenth-century anesthesia parties. An afterword discusses the new threat of infectious diseases--including malaria, yellow fever, and cholera--with today's global warming. "Copub: Granta"
Main Description
In 1831, an unknown, horrifying, and deadly disease from Asia swept across continental Europe and North America, killing millions and throwing the medical profession into confusion. A killer with little respect for class or wealth, cholera ravaged the squalid streets of Soho and rocked the great centers of Victorian power. In this gripping book, Sandra Hempel tells the story of John Snow, a reclusive doctor without money or social position, who--alone and unrecognized--had the genius to look beyond the conventional wisdom of his day and uncover the truth behind the pandemic. She describes how Snow discovered that cholera was spread through drinking water and how this subsequently laid the foundations for the modern, scientific investigation of todays fatal plagues. A dramatic account with a colorful cast of characters, "The Strange Case of the Broad Street Pump "features diversions into fascinating facets of medical and social history, such as Snows tending of Queen Victoria in childbirth, Dutch microbiologist Leeuwenhoeks deliberate breeding of lice in his socks, Dickensian childrens farms, and riotous nineteenth-century anesthesia parties. An afterword discusses the new threat of infectious diseases--including malaria, yellow fever, and cholera--with todays global warming. "Copub: Granta"
Main Description
In 1831, an unknown, horrifying, and deadly disease from Asia swept across continental Europe and North America, killing millions and throwing the medical profession into confusion. A killer with little respect for class or wealth, cholera ravaged the squalid streets of Soho and rocked the great centers of Victorian power. In this gripping book, Sandra Hempel tells the story of John Snow, a reclusive doctor without money or social position, who--alone and unrecognized--had the genius to look beyond the conventional wisdom of his day and uncover the truth behind the pandemic. She describes how Snow discovered that cholera was spread through drinking water and how this subsequently laid the foundations for the modern, scientific investigation of today's fatal plagues. A dramatic account with a colorful cast of characters, The Strange Case of the Broad Street Pump features diversions into fascinating facets of medical and social history, such as Snow's tending of Queen Victoria in childbirth, Dutch microbiologist Leeuwenhoek's deliberate breeding of lice in his socks, Dickensian children's farms, and riotous nineteenth-century anesthesia parties. An afterword discusses the new threat of infectious diseases--including malaria, yellow fever, and cholera--with today's global warming. Copub: Granta
Table of Contents
Introduction : the long journeyp. 1
A country holds its breathp. 9
A desperate searchp. 30
It's herep. 49
The surgeon's apprenticep. 67
A London trainingp. 84
A very peculiar manp. 93
A shameful state of affairsp. 110
A little lightp. 130
Sensationp. 142
The grand experimentp. 159
A plague on their housesp. 176
The big ideap. 190
Proof positivep. 204
Euglenae and red cottonp. 219
The verdictsp. 223
End gamep. 250
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem