Catalogue


Essential philosophy of psychiatry /
Tim Thornton.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
description
xii, 267 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
019922871X, 9780199228713
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
isbn
019922871X
9780199228713
contents note
Anti-psychiatry, values, and the philosophy of psychiatry -- Values, psychiatric ethics, and clinical judgement -- Understanding psychopathology -- Theorising about meaning for mental health care -- The validity of psychiatric classification -- The relation of evidence-based medicine and tacit knowledge in clinical judgement.
catalogue key
6273974
 
Includes a bibliography of materials that the author has published elsewhere: p. [261]-262.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [245]-259) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry is a concise introduction to the growing field of philosophy of psychiatry. Divided into three main aspects of psychiatric clinical judgement, values, meanings and facts, it examines the key debates about mental health care, and the philosophical ideas and tools needed to assess those debates, in six chapters. In addition to outlining the state of play, Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry presents a coherent and unified approach across the different debates, characterized by a rejection of reductionism and an emphasis on the ineliminability of uncodified skilled judgement. The first part, Values, outlines the debate about whether diagnosis of mental illness is essentially value-laden and argues that the prospects for reducing illness or disease to plainly factual matters are poor. It also explains the important role of skilled contextual judgement, rather than a principles-based deduction, in ethical judgement. The second part, Meanings, examines the central role of understanding and a shared first person perspective, both against attempts to reduce meaning to basic information-processing mechanisms and to explain away the difficulties of understanding psychopathology in recent models of delusion. The third part, Facts, shows the importance of uncodified clinical judgements, both in assessing the validity of psychiatric taxonomy and in the application of Evidence Based Medicine. Despite advances in the codifaction of practice and operationalism of diagnosis, an element of judgement remains in the assessment both of what, at one level, is good evidence for diagnosis and treatment and what, at a higher level, is good evidence for the validity of classification overall.
Main Description
Essential Philosophy of Psychiatryis a concise introduction to the growing field of philosophy of psychiatry. Divided into three main aspects of psychiatric clinical judgement, values, meanings and facts, it examines the key debates about mental health care, and the philosophical ideas and tools needed to assess those debates, in six chapters. In addition to outlining the state of play,Essential Philosophy of Psychiatrypresents a coherent and unified approach across the different debates, characterized by a rejection of reductionism and an emphasis on the ineliminability of uncodified skilled judgement. The first part, Values, outlines the debate about whether diagnosis of mental illness is essentially value-laden and argues that the prospects for reducing illness or disease to plainly factual matters are poor. It also explains the important role of skilled contextual judgement, rather than a principles-based deduction, in ethical judgement. The second part, Meanings, examines the central role of understanding and a shared first person perspective, both against attempts to reduce meaning to basic information-processing mechanisms and to explain away the difficulties of understanding psychopathology in recent models of delusion. The third part, Facts, shows the importance of uncodified clinical judgements, both in assessing the validity of psychiatric taxonomy and in the application of Evidence Based Medicine. Despite advances in the codifaction of practice and operationalism of diagnosis, an element of judgement remains in the assessment both of what, at one level, is good evidence for diagnosis and treatment and what, at a higher level, is good evidence for the validity of classification overall.
Main Description
In recent years there has been a major move within psychiatry to foster a deeper understanding of the conceptual underpinnings of mental health. This new approach has drawn in equal measure on both the humanities and medicine. Essential Philosophy if Psychiatry is both an introduction to, anda summary of a rapidly growing field. It is the first concise introduction to what is a contested field, written by one of the people driving it forward. Because recent philosophy of psychiatry has drawn from moral philosophy, the philosophy of mind and language, and the philosophy of science, it is difficult to get a clear overview of the field. This book does just that. It is divided into three parts: Values, Meanings and Facts. In addition, thereis a short chapter of conclusions, a glossary of philosophical terms and a guide to further reading. For anyone looking for an accessible, undaunting introduction to this field, this is the essential text.
Table of Contents
Values
Anti-psychiatry, values and the philosophy of psychiatry
The debate between 'values in' and values out' accounts of mental illness
Putting the debate into context
A biological teleological model of mental illness
Mild cognitive impairment: a case study in philosophy of psychiatry
Values, psychiatric ethics and clinical judgement
A toolkit for ethical reasoning in medicine and psychiatry?
Judgement and the broader framework of Values Based Practice
The role of judgement in the Four Principles approach to medical ethics
Meanings
Understanding psychopathology
Jaasperes on the role of understanding in psychiatry
The attempt to understand psychopathology in recent philosophy of psychiatry
Theorising about meaning for mental health care
Cognitivism, the mind and inner states
The discursive turn, social constructionism and dementia
A Wittgensteinian account of meaning
Facts
The validity of psychiatric classification
Facts, values and psychiatric validity
Two complications for psychiatric classification
Lessons from the philosophy of science
The relation of Evidence Based Medicine and tacit knowledge in clinical judgement
The presence of Evidence Based Medicine in psychiatry
Hume's challenge to induction
Responses to Hume
The role of individual judgement in induction
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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