Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

UofT Libraries is getting a new library services platform in January 2021.
Learn more about the change.

Bonds of affection : civic charity and the making of America--Winthrop, Jefferson, and Lincoln /
Matthew S. Holland.
imprint
Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, c2007.
description
xii, 321 p.
ISBN
158901183X (alk. paper), 9781589011830 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, c2007.
isbn
158901183X (alk. paper)
9781589011830 (alk. paper)
contents note
Prologue: "Bonds of affection" : three founding moments -- pt. 1. Winthrop and America's point of departure. Introduction: Hawthorne's suggestion. A model of Christian charity. Two cities upon a hill -- pt. 2. Jefferson and the founding. Introduction: 1776 - the other document. A model of natural liberty. "To close the circle of our felicities" -- pt. 3. Lincoln's refounding. Introduction: From Tom to Abe : the agapic ends of America's bloodiest war. "Hail fall of furry! Reign of reason, all hail." "This nation under God." A model of civic charity -- Conclusion -- Appendix 1. A model of Christian charity -- Appendix 2. Thomas Jefferson's "original rough draught" of the Declaration of Independence -- Appendix 3. Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural -- Appendix 4. Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural.
catalogue key
6273716
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Matthew S. Holland is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Brigham Young University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2007-10-15:
In a thoughtful and carefully crafted book, Holland (political science, Brigham Young Univ.) argues that civic charity is an important, if unappreciated, component of America's political culture. He meticulously traces the biblical tradition of Christian charity, agape, and how the idea or value of charity made its way into American political life. In charity's transition from a religious to a civic value, it becomes civic charity. Civic charity, Holland contends, calls for "a public recognition of and gratitude for a God of judgment and providence even as it respects and helps establish a constitutionally robust pluralism including a substantial degree of separation of church and state." To support his argument, he conducts a close contextual analysis of three of America's greatest and most influential speeches: John Winthrop's "A Model of Christian Charity," Jefferson's first inaugural address, and Lincoln's second inaugural address and traces the intellectual threads that connect them. Holland's command of the literature and critical analysis of the texts are truly impressive. Not a book that the average patron will select for casual reading, this work is recommended primarily for all academic libraries and larger public libraries that support academic research.-Thomas J. Baldino, Wilkes Univ., Wilkes-Barre, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2008-04-01:
In this artfully conceived and gracefully written study, Holland (Brigham Young Univ.) explores the role of charity in three founding moments of American national-political identity. Centered on single texts, reproduced in the appendix, from Winthrop, Jefferson, and Lincoln, the analysis adroitly combines biography, political theory, and American cultural history to argue that America was founded on a tension-filled synthesis of natural liberty and Christian charity. Each founder taught in quite different ways that, without duty-laden bonds of affection, the forbearance and sacrifice required to sustain freedom would not be forthcoming: without charity there can be no "people" and without a people, no coherent polity to defend liberty. As in David Greenstone's Lincoln Persuasion (CH, Feb'94, 31-3463), Lincoln represents the culmination/fulfillment of America. In Holland's reading, Lincoln's haunting and mystical second inaugural address becomes a synthesis of Winthrop's rigorously demanding and quasi-Hebraic sermon "A Model of Christian Charity" and Jefferson's first inaugural address and appeals to solidarity grounded in moral sentiments and a humanistic reading of the Gospels. Holland sees a self-destructive moral hollowness in liberal individualism and helps the reader to see in civic charity the long-standing American resources of agency and power. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, all undergraduate students, graduate students, and research faculty. E. J. Eisenach emeritus, University of Tulsa
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A book well worth reading, both in terms of its insights into American politics and as an example of how to read texts carefully." -- Politics and Religion
"[A] thoughtfully and carefully crafted book...Holland's command of the literature and critical analysis of the texts are truly impressive." -- Library Journal
"Matthew Holland reminds us of a concept we are in danger of forgetting---civic affection---and the role it played in the forming of our union. Although we may never meet face to face, citizens are united by bonds that go beyond self-interest---that is Holland's thesis---and he elaborates it with careful historic analysis. An interesting and moving
" Bonds of Affection is an exemplary piece of scholarship. It is thoughtfully conceived and rigorously argued. Readers will be impressed by the exceptional breadth and depth of knowledge displayed, as well as by the author's philosophical sophistication and interpretative skills. Matthew S. Holland is a rising star in the field of American political thought." -- Robert P. George , McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and Director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, Princeton University
"Matthew Holland reminds us of a concept we are in danger of forgetting: civic affection and the role it played in the forming of our union. Although we may never meet face to face, citizens are united by bonds that go beyond self-interest -- that is Holland's thesis -- and he elaborates it with careful historic analysis. An interesting and moving work." -- Jean Bethke Elshtain , Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics, The University of Chicago and author of Democracy on Trial
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, October 2007
Choice, April 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Notions of Christian love, or charity, shaped the political thought of Winthorp, Jefferson, and Lincoln as each presided over a foundational moment of American democracy. Holland examines how each figure interpreted and appropriated charity, revealing both the problems and possibilities of making it a political ideal.
Long Description
Notions of Christian love, or charity, strongly shaped the political thought of John Winthrop, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln as each presided over a foundational moment in the development of American democracy. Matthew Holland examines how each figure interpreted and appropriated charity, revealing both the problems and possibilities of making it a political ideal. Weaving a rich tapestry of insights from political science and literature and American religious history and political theory, Bonds of Affection is a major contribution to the study of American political identity. Matthew Holland makes plain that civic charity, while commonly rejected as irrelevant or even harmful to political engagement, has been integral to our national character. The book includes the full texts of Winthrop's speech "A Model of Christian Charity"; Jefferson's rough draft of the Declaration and his First Inaugural; and Lincoln's Second Inaugural.
Main Description
Notions of Christian love, or charity, strongly shaped the political thought of John Winthrop, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln as each presided over a foundational moment in the development of American democracy. Matthew Holland examines how each figure interpreted and appropriated charity, revealing both the problems and possibilities of making it a political ideal. Holland first looks at early American literature and seminal speeches by Winthrop to show how the Puritan theology of this famed 17th century governor of the Massachusetts Colony (he who first envisioned America as a "City upon a Hill") galvanized an impressive sense of self-rule and a community of care in the early republic, even as its harsher aspects made something like Jefferson's Enlightenment faith in liberal democracy a welcome development. Holland then shows that between Jefferson's early rough draft of the Declaration of Independence and his First Inaugural Jefferson came to see some notion of charity as a necessary complement to modern political liberty. However, Holland argues, it was Lincoln and his ingenious blend of Puritan and democratic insights who best fulfilled the promise of this nation's "bonds of affection." With his recognition of the imperfections of both North and South, his humility in the face of God's judgment on the Civil War, and his insistence on "charity for all," including the defeated Confederacy, Lincoln personified the possibilities of religious love turned civic virtue. Weaving a rich tapestry of insights from political science and literature and American religious history and political theory, Bonds of Affection is a major contribution to the study of American political identity. Matthew Holland makes plain that civic charity, while commonly rejected as irrelevant or even harmful to political engagement, has been integral to our national character. The book includes the full texts of Winthrop's speech "A Model of Christian Charity"; Jefferson's rough draft of the Declaration and his First Inaugural; and Lincoln's Second Inaugural.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Prologue: "Bonds of Affection"-Three Founding Momentsp. 1
Winthrop and America's Point of Departure: Hawthorne's Suggestionp. 21
A Model of Christian Charityp. 27
Two Cities upon a Hillp. 56
Jefferson and the Founding: 1776-The Other Declarationp. 93
A Model of Natural Libertyp. 97
"To Close the Circle of Our Felicities"p. 128
Lincoln and the Refounding of America: From Tom to Abep. 161
"Hail Fall of Fury! Reign of Reason, All Hail!"p. 169
"This Nation, Under God"p. 200
A Model of Civic Charityp. 219
Conclusion: Bonds of Freedomp. 241
John Winthrop's "A Model of Christian Charity" Speechp. 261
Thomas Jefferson's "original Rough draught" of the Declaration of Independencep. 277
Thomas Jefferson's First Inauguralp. 283
Abraham Lincoln's Second Inauguralp. 289
Bibliographyp. 291
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem