The Crimea question : identity, transition, and conflict /
Gwendolyn Sasse.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Distributed by Harvard University Press for the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, c2007.
description
xv, 400 p.
ISBN
1932650016 (alk. paper), 9781932650013 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Distributed by Harvard University Press for the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, c2007.
isbn
1932650016 (alk. paper)
9781932650013 (alk. paper)
contents note
Identity and conflict in transition -- Imagining Crimea : the symbols and myths of a politicized landscape -- The making of history : writing and rewriting "Crimea" -- The institutional legacies of territory and ethnicity -- Reassessing the 1954 transfer of Crimea -- The last Soviet ASSR : the mobilization of Crimean separatism -- Crimea's post-Soviet Russian movement : the rise and fall of separatism -- Integrating Crimea into the Ukrainian state -- The outlook for Crimean autonomy and its aftermath -- The international dimensions of the Crimea question.
catalogue key
6273692
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Regional diversity such as Ukraine's often embodies potential for friction and conflict, in particular when it involves territorialized ethnicity and divergent historical experiences. Political elites interested in stability and conflict prevention must find ways either to accommodate or control this diversity. In the early to mid-1990s, the Western media, policymakers, and academics alike warned that Crimea was a potential center of unrest in the aftermath of the Soviet Union's dissolution. However, large-scale conflict in Crimea did not materialize, and Kyiv has managed to integrate the peninsula into the new Ukrainian polity. This book explores the factors that led to the largely peaceful transition and places the situation in the larger context of conflict-prevention studies, explaining this critical case in which conflict did not erupt despite a structural predisposition to ethnic, regional, and even international enmity.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Sasse explores the factors that led to the largely peaceful transition and places the situation in the larger context of conflict-prevention studies, explaining this critical case in which conflict did not erupt despite a structural predisposition to ethnic, regional, and even international enmity.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Mapsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Identity and Conflict in Transitionp. 13
Imagining Crimea: The Symbols and Myths of a Politicized Landscapep. 35
The Making of History: Writing and Rewriting "Crimea"p. 65
The Institutional Legacies of Territory and Ethnicityp. 83
Reassessing the 1954 Transfer of Crimeap. 107
The Last Soviet ASSR: The Mobilization of Crimean Separatismp. 129
Crimea's Post-Soviet Russian Movement: The Rise and Fall of Separatismp. 155
Integrating Crimea into the Ukrainian Statep. 175
Crimean Autonomy and Its Aftermathp. 201
The International Dimensions of the Crimea Questionp. 221
Conclusionp. 251
Epiloguep. 263
The Crimean Population, 1897-2001p. 275
Elite Interviews in April and September-October 1996p. 277
Regional Elite Turnover and Profile, 1990-98p. 281
Notesp. 295
Works Citedp. 361
Indexp. 387
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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