Catalogue


Trampled no more : voices from Bulawayo's townships about families, life, survival, and social change in Zimbabwe.
Moyo, Otrude Nontobeko.
imprint
Lanham, MD : University Press of America, c2007.
description
vii, 303 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0761836365 (pbk.), 9780761836360 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham, MD : University Press of America, c2007.
isbn
0761836365 (pbk.)
9780761836360 (pbk.)
catalogue key
6259283
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-300) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Otrude Nontobeko Moyo is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Maine and she teaches social welfare policy and critical multicultural practices.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Dr. Moyo persusasively argues for the use of biographical narration and varieties of story telling to get at important information about the social structure, self-perception and therefore possibility for household, community, and social policy change in these areas [Zimbabwe and its townships] and by extension possibly in other parts of Africa. The introductory material describes how Dr. Moyo has developed as a participant observer who brings new things to her perceptions of her culture as she becomes increasingly a person of two worlds, a scholar looking from the outside and a daughter of the area with a history and connections which are intensely personal. This puts her in a privileged relation to her subjects, but her current distance also supplies the new questions which this book begins to address.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2008
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Summaries
Title Summary
"The stories of the Zimbabwean situation, particularly those of the urban townships of Bulawayo, are narrated through the voices of family members recounting their personal circumstances and what they perceive as the primary factors contributing to their repressed positions in the socioeconomical hierarchy. Professor Moyo goes behind the scenes in order to dismantle the simplistic "blame game" which asserts that the deterioration of Zimbabwe was caused solely by the current ZANU-PF lead government." "The study details the historical context and interpretations of history, which led to the much-discussed Zimbabwean political and economic crisis. Through the narratives of the Zimbabwean people, Professor Moyo highlights some of the acute strategies they and their families have used to survive as a way to explore future policy avenues that take into account people's "agentiveness" (the capacity to overcome unfavorable conditions by utilizing what little resources are available), Zimbabwe's greatest asset."--BOOK JACKET.
Long Description
The stories of the Zimbabwean situation, particularly those of the urban townships of Bulawayo, are poignantly narrated through the voices of family members recounting their personal circumstances and what they perceive as the primary factors contributing to their repressed positions in the socio-economical hierarchy. Using an insider's perspective, Professor Moyo goes behind the scenes in order to dismantle the simplistic "blame game" which asserts that the deterioration of Zimbabwe was caused solely by the current ZANU-PF lead government. The study details the historical context and interpretations of history, which led to the much-discussed Zimbabwean political and economic crisis. Socio-economic policies that shape, and continue to shape, the complex livelihoods of the Zimbabwean people are also attributed to current and future conditions. The author argues that within the Zimbabwean situation these contributors and their counters have not encouraged the prioritization of the needs of the most vulnerable population groups, but rather, that they have a tendency to hinder their general well being by limiting fundamental resources such as access to basic necessities, freedoms, affirmation of communality and individuality. Through the narratives of the Zimbabwean people, Professor Moyo highlights some of the acute strategies they and their families have used to survive as a way to explore future policy avenues that take into account people's "agentiveness" (the capacity to overcome unfavorable conditions by utilizing what little resources are available), Zimbabwe's greatest asset.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. V
Trampled No More: An Introductionp. 1
Zimbabwe: The Place and Its Peoplep. 19
Interpreting the Zimbabwean Situationp. 34
A Historical Sketch of Select Policies and Events that Sculpted Zimbabwep. 58
Bulawayo: A Portraitp. 92
Ancestors: We, Too, Are People!p. 121
The Scars of a Living Memory: Khulu Nhlathup. 125
Eking Out a Living from the Spit of a Fly: MaNkomop. 142
Even amaNyasaranda Belong to Zimbabwe: Edison and MaMlauzip. 158
Soldiering On: Rambayi Makashinga!p. 173
I Was a Soldier Once, but Soldering Is Not for Me Anymore: Mdlulip. 177
Soldiering On: MaLunga and Nkosip. 189
It Is Fear that Keeps the Jackal Barking: MaVundla's Familyp. 202
Living with Another Woman's Man: MaBandap. 213
The Born Frees: Families and Livelihoods Reconstituted by Transnational Migrationp. 227
A Child-Headed Household: Valerie's Familyp. 231
Moyo weGreen Housep. 245
Transnational Partnerships and Pooled Poverty: MaSibindi's Familyp. 257
Dreams Turned to Dust, Immigration That Kills: Sipho's Storyp. 267
Conclusion: On Being Trampled No Morep. 271
Glossary of non-English Wordsp. 287
Bibliographyp. 291
Indexp. 301
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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