Catalogue


Pretty creatures : children and fiction in the English Renaissance /
Michael Witmore.
imprint
Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press, 2007.
description
viii, 233 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0801443997 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780801443992 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press, 2007.
isbn
0801443997 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780801443992 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Ut pueritas poesis : the child and fiction in the English Renaissance -- Animated children in Elizabeth's coronation pageant of 1559 -- Phatic metadrama and the touch of irony in English children's theater -- Mamillius, The winter's tale, and the impetus of fiction -- The lies children tell : counterfeiting victims and witnesses in early modern English witchcraft trials and possessions.
catalogue key
6258968
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-03-01:
Witmore (Carnegie Mellon Univ.) argues that during the English Renaissance the mimetic roles of children in public spectacles were seen to pose fundamental questions about the nature of fiction. Drawing an analogy between seemingly spontaneous actions by children and imaginative fiction thus became a way for Renaissance writers to explore both the creation and consumption of fiction and its social purposes. Witmore examines four aspects of this child-fiction analogy through chapters devoted to children's roles in the coronation pageant of Elizabeth I, the satirical drama performed by children's companies, the role of Mamillius in Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, and the testimony of children in witchcraft trials. Overall, Witmore's analysis of the role of children as an agency of fiction breaks new ground, making this book an original, valuable contribution to understanding both the figure of the child during the Renaissance and the Renaissance debate over the nature of mimesis. Witmore's predilection for lengthy sentences will make this book slow reading for undergraduates, but otherwise it is quite accessible. The author provides full bibliographic footnotes and a detailed index, but no separate bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. B. E. Brandt South Dakota State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In Pretty Creatures, Michael Witmore traces the figure of the child as sign and symptom of the efficacy of Renaissance fictions (plays, royal pageants, spectacles, witch trials). One of the virtues of this powerful book is its sustained regard for all forms of cultural production, enabling readers to trace the contours of intellectual history against the vivid details of everyday practice. Gone is the figure of the child as a sentimentalized icon of innocence to be replaced by a story about the interrelation between magic and science in a pre-Baconian world. Pretty Creatures challenges us to revisit the children who haunt Renaissance drama. That we are now equipped to make sense of these diminutive presences is a measure of the book's success."-Julian Yates, author of Error, Misuse, Failure: Object Lessons from the English Renaissance
"The complexity and significance of Witmore's Pretty Creatures belie its title. . . . This is a book to be read by any scholar of the early modern period, or indeed of any period, interested in the evolving concept of fiction, explored here in a range including civic spectacles, plays written for children's companies, a Shakespeare play (The Winter's Tale) and, as an innovative test case, children's testimonies at witch trials. . . . It will encourage or require the continued rethinking of the presence of children as performers in much early modern literature."-Mary Ellen Lamb, Modern Philology (Vol. 109, No. 1)
"Witmore's analysis of the role of children as an agency of fiction breaks new ground, making this book an original, valuable contribution to understanding both the figure of the child during the Renaissance and the Renaissance debate over the nature of mimesis."-Choice
"Written in a vivid and engaging style, Pretty Creatures offers a strikingly original perspective on the early modern images of children as both 'artless and artful.' In a fresh approach, Witmore ties the status of the child as a mimic to the Renaissance debates over mimesis. He draws on contemporary theory and a wonderfully diverse set of sources, both visual and textual, to unfold his fascinating argument about children as representative of the agency of fiction."-Rebecca Bushnell, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2008
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Pretty Creatures' examines the ways in which children, with their proverbial capacity for spontaneous imitation and their imaginative absorption, came to exemplify the virtues and powers of fiction during the English Renaissance.
Main Description
Children had surprisingly central roles in many of the public performances of the English Renaissance, whether in entertainments-civic pageants, children's theaters, Shakespearean drama-or in more grim religious and legal settings, as when children were "possessed by demons" or testified as witnesses in witchcraft trials. Taken together, such spectacles made repeated connections between child performers as children and the mimetic powers of fiction in general. In Pretty Creatures, Michael Witmore examines the ways in which children, with their proverbial capacity for spontaneous imitation and their imaginative absorption, came to exemplify the virtues and powers of fiction during this era.As much concerned with Renaissance poetics as with children's roles in public spectacles of the period, Pretty Creatures attempts to bring the antics of children-and the rich commentary these antics provoked-into the mainstream of Renaissance studies, performance studies, and studies of reformation culture in England. As such, it represents an alternative history of the concept of mimesis in the period, one that is built from the ground up through reflections on the actual performances of what was arguably nature's greatest mimic: the child.
Main Description
Children had surprisingly central roles in many of the public performances of the English Renaissance, whether in entertainments-civic pageants, children's theaters, Shakespearean drama-or in more grim religious and legal settings, as when children were "possessed by demons" or testified as witnesses in witchcraft trials. Taken together, such spectacles made repeated connections between child performers as children and the mimetic powers of fiction in general. In Pretty Creatures, Michael Witmore examines the ways in which children, with their proverbial capacity for spontaneous imitation and their imaginative absorption, came to exemplify the virtues and powers of fiction during this era. As much concerned with Renaissance poetics as with children's roles in public spectacles of the period, Pretty Creatures attempts to bring the antics of children-and the rich commentary these antics provoked-into the mainstream of Renaissance studies, performance studies, and studies of reformation culture in England. As such, it represents an alternative history of the concept of mimesis in the period, one that is built from the ground up through reflections on the actual performances of what was arguably nature's greatest mimic: the child.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Note on Modernizationp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Ut Pueritas Poesis: The Child and Fiction in the English Renaissancep. 20
Animated Children in Elizabeth's Coronation Pageant of 1559p. 58
Phatic Metadrama and the Touch of Irony in English Children's Theaterp. 95
Mamillius, The Winter's Tale, and the Impetus of Fictionp. 137
The Lies Children Tell: Counterfeiting Victims and Witnesses in Early Modern English Witchcraft Trials and Possessionsp. 171
Epiloguep. 213
Indexp. 223
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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