Catalogue


Privatization in Malaysia : regulation, rent-seeking, and policy failure /
Jeff Tan.
imprint
Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2007.
description
xvi, 234 p.
ISBN
0415428211 (hardback : alk. paper), 9780415428217 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2007.
isbn
0415428211 (hardback : alk. paper)
9780415428217 (hardback : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6258536
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-06-01:
Privatization of public enterprises is a crucial issue, particularly for underdeveloped countries confronted with the conditions imposed by structural adjustment programs of the World Bank and other donor agencies. This well-written and properly documented study, based on the experience of privatization of some major public enterprises in Malaysia, demolishes the commonly held view that private enterprises are necessarily more efficient than public enterprises and that privatization necessarily improves efficiency. This study clearly outlines the circumstances and conditions under which privatization might fail and what policies would be needed to make it work. The author provides case examples on Malaysia's national sewerage system, rail transit, airlines, and automobiles. Policy makers will find the study's conclusions useful for formulating plans for privatization, and graduate students in economic development and public administration will also benefit from this study. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional collections. J. S. Uppal SUNY at Albany
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This well-written and properly documented study, based on the experience of privatization of some major public enterprises in Malaysia, demolishes the commonly held view that private enterprises are necessarily more efficient than public enterprises and that privatization necessarily improves efficiency...Policy makers will find the study's conclusions useful for formulating plans for privatization, and graduate students in economic development and public administration will also benefit from this study." - J. S. Uppal, SUNY at Albany, CHOICE June 2008 Vol. 45 No. 10 "Jeff Tan advances our understanding of Malaysian privatization by reaching deeply into complex matrices of political, technical, regulatory and governance failures that undid the privatization of the national airlines company (Malaysian Airlines System, or MAS), urban rail sustem (Star, Putra and KL Monorail), national sewage treatment project (Indah Water Konsortium, or IWK), and car manufacturing plant (National Automobile Industry, or Proton). The result is a penetrating critique of the weaknesses of Malaysian privatization that has the additional and considerable merit of exposing the flaws in the neoliberal arguments that proffered provatization as the panacea to state inefficiency." - Boo-Teik Khoo, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia "Jeff Tan's Privatisation in Malaysia...tackles the topic with an insightful and original combination of political economy perspective and detailed case studies. His framework and findings contribute richly to our understanding of Malaysia's privatization failures and challenge the continued propagation of such policies in developing countries...This books sheds valuable light in retrospect on why privatization failed." - Hwok-Aun LEE, SOJOURN: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia, Volume 25, Number 2 (October 2010) "The book presents a detailed and well-argued explanation of why privatisation in Malaysia failed. Moreover, and perhaps more importantly, the book also presents an alternative general model as to why privatisation sometimes fails." - Siaan Ansori, Australian National University, The Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, Volume 41/3, October 2010
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2008
Choice, June 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In recent years, privatisation has fallen out of favour in many countries because the underlying political factors have not been well understood. This book examines Malaysia "s privatisation programme, focusing on how political constraints resulted in the failure of four major privatisations: the national sewerage company (IWK), Kuala Lumpur Light Rail Transit (LRT), national airline (MAS), and national car company (Proton). It considers why developing countries such as Malaysia might want to embark on privatisation, the factors that lead to policy failure, and what is needed to make it work. It shows clearly that political motives driving privatisation often dominate purely economic considerations, and thus it is necessary to analyse privatisation within the specific country context. It argues that failure in the Malaysian case was due to political considerations that compromised institutional design and regulatory enforcement, leading to problems associated with corruption. It concludes that privatisation does not necessarily improve incentives for efficiency or enhance the finance available for capital investment, and that successful privatisation depends on the state "s institutional and political capacity to design and manage an appropriate set of subsidies. Overall, this book is a comprehensive examination of privatisation in Malaysia, providing important insights for understanding the political economy of this process in other developing countries.
Back Cover Copy
In recent years, privatization has fallen out of favour in many countries because the underlying political factors have not been well understood. This book explores privatization in Malaysia, focusing in particular on how political constraints resulted in the failure of four major privatizations: the national sewerage company (IWK), Kuala Lumpur Light Rail Transit (LRT), national airline (MAS), and national car company (Proton).Considering why developing countries such as Malaysia might want to embark upon privatization, the factors that lead to policy failure, and what is needed to make it work, it shows clearly that political motives driving privatization often dominate purely economic considerations, and thus it is necessary to analyze privatization within the specific country context. The author argues that failure in the Malaysian case was due to political considerations that compromised institutional design and regulatory enforcement, leading to problems associated with corruption; and concludes that privatization does not necessarily improve incentives for efficiency or enhance the finance available for capital investment, and that therefore successful privatization depends on the state's institutional and political capacity to design and manage an appropriate set of subsidies.
Back Cover Copy
In recent years, privatization has fallen out of favour in many countries because the underlying political factors have not been well understood. This book examines Malaysia's privatization programme, focusing on how political constraints resulted in the failure of four major privatizations: the national sewerage company (IWK), Kuala Lumpur Light Rail Transit (LRT), national airline (MAS) and national car company (Proton). It considers why developing countries such as Malaysia might want to embark upon privatization, the factors that lead to policy failure, and what is needed to make it work. It shows clearly that political motives driving privatization often dominate purely economic considerations, and thus it is necessary to analyse privatization within the specific country context. It argues that failure in the Malaysian case was due to political considerations that compromised institutional design and regulatory enforcement, leading to problems associated with corruption. It concludes that privatization does not necessarily improve incentives for efficiency or enhance the finance available for capital investment, and that successful privatization depends on the state's institutional and political capacity to design and manage an appropriate set of subsidies. Overall, this book is a comprehensive examination of privatization in Malaysia, providing important insights for understanding the political economy of this process in other developing countries.
Back Cover Copy
In recent years, privatisation has fallen out of favour in many countries because the underlying political factors have not been well understood. This book explores privatisation in Malaysia, focusing in particular on how political constraints resulted in the failure of four major privatisations: the national sewerage company (IWK), Kuala Lumpur Light Rail Transit (LRT), national airline (MAS), and national car company (Proton). It considers why developing countries such as Malaysia might want to embark upon privatisation, the factors that lead to policy failure, and what is needed to make it work. It shows clearly that political motives driving privatisation often dominate purely economic considerations, and thus it is necessary to analyse privatisation within the specific country context. It argues that failure in the Malaysian case was due to political considerations that compromised institutional design and regulatory enforcement, leading to problems associated with corruption. It concludes that privatisation does not necessarily improve incentives for efficiency or enhance the finance available for capital investment, and that therefore successful privatisation depends on the state's institutional and political capacity to design and manage an appropriate set of subsidies. Overall, this book is a comprehensive examination of privatisation in Malaysia, providing important insights for understanding the political economy of other developing countries.
Back Cover Copy
In recent years, privatisation has fallen out of favour in many countries because the underlying political factors have not been well understood. This book examines Malaysia's privatisation programme, focusing on how political constraints resulted in the failure of four major privatisations: the national sewerage company (IWK), Kuala Lumpur Light Rail Transit (LRT), national airline (MAS), and national car company (Proton). It considers why developing countries such as Malaysia might want to embark on privatisation, the factors that lead to policy failure, and what is needed to make it work. It shows clearly that political motives driving privatisation often dominate purely economic considerations, and thus it is necessary to analyse privatisation within the specific country context. It argues that failure in the Malaysian case was due to political considerations that compromised institutional design and regulatory enforcement, leading to problems associated with corruption. It concludes that privatisation does not necessarily improve incentives for efficiency or enhance the finance available for capital investment, and that successful privatisation depends on the state's institutional and political capacity to design and manage an appropriate set of subsidies. Overall, this book is a comprehensive examination of privatisation in Malaysia, providing important insights for understanding the political economy of this process in other developing countries.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring privatization in Malaysia, this work focuses in particular on how political constraints have caused the failure of four major privatizations: the national sewerage company (IWK), Kuala Lumpur Light Rail Transit (LRT), national airline (MAS), and national car company (Proton).
Table of Contents
List of tablesp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introduction: why privatize?p. 1
Privatization, rents and rent-seekingp. 7
Why privatize in developing countries?p. 10
Why may privatization fail?p. 18
What is needed to make privatization work?p. 33
Institutional and political failure: privatization in Malaysiap. 39
Why did Malaysia privatize?p. 41
Malaysia's privatization programme (1983-2000)p. 52
Why did privatization fail?p. 64
Conditions for successful privatizationp. 72
Universal access and private provision: Malaysia's national sewerage systemp. 78
Challengesp. 80
Backgroundp. 82
Performancep. 84
Problemsp. 90
Conclusionp. 103
The myth of privatized urban rail: Kuala Lumpur Light Rail Transitp. 106
Challengesp. 107
Backgroundp. 111
Performancep. 114
Problemsp. 123
Conclusionp. 131
Perverse incentives: Malaysia Airlinesp. 133
Challengesp. 135
Backgroundp. 139
Performancep. 140
Problemsp. 147
Conclusionp. 156
Rents and industrial upgrading: Protonp. 158
Challengesp. 161
Backgroundp. 164
Performancep. 167
Problemsp. 179
Conclusionp. 186
Summary and conclusionp. 188
Notesp. 196
Referencesp. 206
Indexp. 225
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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