Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Turning to nature in Germany : hiking, nudism, and conservation, 1900-1940 /
John Alexander Williams.
imprint
Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, 2007.
description
x, 354 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780804700153 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, 2007.
isbn
9780804700153 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
"The body demands its rights" : the workers' nudist movement -- Social hiking : the Naturfreunde movement -- The roots of organized youth hiking : Wandervögel, youth cultivators, and moral panic, 1900-1915 -- Between authority and freedom : youth cultivation through hiking, 1916-1928 -- The assault on youth hiking, 1929-1940 -- From preserving to planning nature : the bourgeois conservationists.
catalogue key
6258067
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-349) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-07-01:
The book's subtitle describes its basic content quite precisely. In his introduction, Williams (Bradley Univ.) explains his general interpretation that hiking, nudism, and conservation were supported by a new ideology the author calls "naturism," a response to the perceived social and cultural crisis besetting an industrializing and urbanizing Germany, rather than supporting the earlier thesis that naturism was protofascist agrarian romanticism. The first two chapters deal with naturism within the Social Democratic labor movement as reflected in socialist nudism and a mass organization for working-class hikers, both suppressed by the Nazis. The next two chapters turn to the middle class's youth hiking movement. Chapter 3 deals with the conflict in the late Wilhelmian era between adolescents and their leaders, while chapter 4 describes the continued effort of youth specialists to achieve their goal of teaching youth how to be good citizens by using youth hostels and group activities in the Weimar Republic. Chapter 5 continues the story into the Nazi years, when hostels and hiking were eventually replaced by the Hitler Youth's camping and marching. Chapter 6 deals with middle-class male elite support of conservation, informed by a stress on homeland and racial nationalism. The whole provides convincing evidence for Williams' thesis. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. H. D. Andrews emeritus, Towson University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Joining the chorus of recent works that have as their center analyses of the rich variety of reform movements of the late Wilhelmine Empire is a fine contribution by John Alexander Williams. In this book Williams combines several historiographical trends that explore the nuance, fragility, and potential of early twentieth-century reform movements." -- American Historical Review
"Joining the chorus of recent works that have as their center analyses of the rich variety of reform movements of the late Wilhelmine Empire is a fine contribution by John Alexander Williams. In this book Williams combines several historiographical trends that explore the nuance, fragility, and potential of early twentieth-century reform movements." --American Historical Review
"The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany's passage to modernity than in other countries. Turning to Natureargues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health thro
"The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany's passage to modernity than in other countries.Turning to Natureargues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health through nature as an antidote to urban ills. Williams advances an original argument, revisionist in thrust, that goes against oversimplifications that see all traditions logically ending in National Socialism." Konrad H. Jarausch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany's passage to modernity than in other countries.Turning to Natureargues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health through nature as an antidote to urban ills. Williams advances an original argument, revisionist in thrust, that goes against oversimplifications that see all traditions logically ending in National Socialism."Konrad H. Jarausch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
" The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany ' s passage to modernity than in other countries. Turning to Nature argues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health through nature as an antidote to urban ills. Williams advances an original argument, revisionist in thrust, that goes against oversimplifications that see all traditions logically ending in National Socialism. " -- Konrad H. Jarausch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
" The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany' s passage to modernity than in other countries. "Turning to Nature" argues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health through nature as an antidote to urban ills. Williams advances an original argument, revisionist in thrust, that goes against oversimplifications that see all traditions logically ending in National Socialism." -- Konrad H. Jarausch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany's passage to modernity than in other countries. "Turning to Nature" argues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health through nature as an antidote to urban ills. Williams advances an original argument, revisionist in thrust, that goes against oversimplifications that see all traditions logically ending in National Socialism." --Konrad H. Jarausch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany's passage to modernity than in other countries. Turning to Natureargues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health through nature as an antidote to urban ills. Williams advances an original argument, revisionist in thrust, that goes against oversimplifications that see all traditions logically ending in National Socialism."--Konrad H. Jarausch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"The symbolic as well as the practical role of nature was more significant in Germany's passage to modernity than in other countries.Turning to Natureargues that overlapping and competing movements attempted to restore the balance of health through nature as an antidote to urban ills. Williams advances an original argument, revisionist in thrust, that goes against oversimplifications that see all traditions logically ending in National Socialism."--Konrad H. Jarausch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
"This study...is about hiking and forms the most nuanced analysis that has appeared so far--since George Mosse and Walter Laqueur started looking at the youth movement in the 1960s. Although the Wandervogelhave been covered extensively before, Williams adds fresh detail."--Geoffrey Giles, German Studies Review
"This study...is about hiking and forms the most nuanced analysis that has appeared so far--since George Mosse and Walter Laqueur started looking at the youth movement in the 1960s. Although theWandervogelhave been covered extensively before, Williams adds fresh detail."--Geoffrey Giles,German Studies Review
" Turning to Nature in Germanymakes an important argument about the normality of German history and about notinterpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad
"Turning to Nature in Germanymakes an important argument about the normality of German history and aboutnotinterpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad range of historical research. His discussions of socialist hiking organizations and attitudes toward nature and youth hiking are really excellentdensely researched, beautifully organized, vigorously and persuasively argued." Celia Applegate, University of Rochester
"Turning to Nature in Germanymakes an important argument about the normality of German history and aboutnotinterpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad range of historical research. His discussions of socialist hiking organizations and attitudes toward nature and youth hiking are really excellentdensely researched, beautifully organized, vigorously and persuasively argued."Celia Applegate, University of Rochester
" "Turning to Nature in Germany" makes an important argument about the normality of German history and about "not" interpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad range of historical research. His discussions of socialist hiking organizations and attitudes toward nature and youth hiking are really excellent-- densely researched, beautifully organized, vigorously and persuasively argued." -- Celia Applegate, University of Rochester
" Turning to Nature in Germany makes an important argument about the normality of German history and about not interpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad range of historical research. His discussions of socialist hiking organizations and attitudes toward nature and youth hiking are really excellent -- densely researched, beautifully organized, vigorously and persuasively argued. " -- Celia Applegate, University of Rochester
""Turning to Nature in Germany" makes an important argument about the normality of German history and about "not" interpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad range of historical research. His discussions of socialist hiking organizations and attitudes toward nature and youth hiking are really excellent--densely researched, beautifully organized, vigorously and persuasively argued." --Celia Applegate, University of Rochester
" Turning to Nature in Germanymakes an important argument about the normality of German history and about notinterpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad range of historical research. His discussions of socialist hiking organizations and attitudes toward nature and youth hiking are really excellent--densely researched, beautifully organized, vigorously and persuasively argued."--Celia Applegate, University of Rochester
"Turning to Nature in Germanymakes an important argument about the normality of German history and aboutnotinterpreting the past in the dark light Nazism casts on it. Williams has a compelling perspective and incorporates a rich and broad range of historical research. His discussions of socialist hiking organizations and attitudes toward nature and youth hiking are really excellent--densely researched, beautifully organized, vigorously and persuasively argued."--Celia Applegate, University of Rochester
"[ Turning to Nature in Germany] offers a comprehensive overview of reform, youth, and nature movements in Germany during the first four decades of the twentieth century with a thematic focus on three areas: nudism, youth hiking, and nature conservatism . . . John Alexander Williams has written an engaging and nuanced book that deserves a broad readership."--Carl Niekerk, Monatshefte
" [Turning to Nature in Germany] offers a valuable corrective to long-held assumptions about nature movements in Germany . . . [It] is a fine contribution to the scholarship on nature movements, German culture, and youth. Unlike many other works on twentieth-century Germany, it manages to show continuities across the major milestones of 1914, 1918, and 1933. Beyond an admirable ability to move across historical breaks, Williams manages to make cogent connections to broader cultural phenomena, especially sexuality. In grouping nudism, youth, and conservation together, he creates fertile connections and promotes a deeper understanding of the role of nature in German society."Jason Tebbe, The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth
"Williams offers valuable new insights...revealing some striking similarities but also some important differences in the way in which class impacted on German attitudes to nature." --Matthew Jefferies, University of Manchester
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2008
Choice, July 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Williams offers a study of mass movements that aimed to bring the German people into closer contact with nature. He shows how manifestations of popular culture reflected the concerns and hopes of their time.
Long Description
"Turning to Nature in Germany" is a study of mass movements that aimed to bring the German people into closer contact with nature. In the early twentieth century organized hikers, nudists, and conservationists all looked to nature for solutions to the nation's political crises. Following these movements over three political eras--the Second Empire, the Weimar Republic, and the Third Reich--the book shows how manifestations of popular culture reflected the concerns and hopes of their time. Williams breaks with historians who have long seen nature movements as anti-modern and irrational by arguing that naturists were calling not for Germany to turn back the clock, but for the nation to find a way to navigate the treacherous waters of contemporary life and strive toward a brighter future.
Main Description
Turning to Nature in Germanyis a study of mass movements that aimed to bring the German people into closer contact with nature. In the early twentieth century organized hikers, nudists, and conservationists all looked to nature for solutions to the nation's political crises. Following these movements over three political eras--the Second Empire, the Weimar Republic, and the Third Reich--the book shows how manifestations of popular culture reflected the concerns and hopes of their time. Williams breaks with historians who have long seen nature movements as anti-modern and irrational by arguing that naturists were calling not for Germany to turn back the clock, but for the nation to find a way to navigate the treacherous waters of contemporary life and strive toward a brighter future.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: The Ideology of Naturism in Early Twentieth-Century Germanyp. 1
Socialists and Nature
"The Body Demands Its Rights": The Workers' Nudist Movementp. 23
Social Hiking: The Naturfreunde Movementp. 67
Youth Hiking
The Roots of Organized Youth Hiking: Wandervogel, Youth Cultivators, and Moral Panic, 1900-1915p. 107
Between Authority and Freedom: Youth Cultivation Through Hiking, 1916-1928p. 147
The Assault on Youth Hiking, 1929-1940p. 185
Conservation
From Preserving to Planning Nature: The Bourgeois Conservationistsp. 219
Conclusion: The Cultural Appropriation of Nature from the Kaiserreich to the Third Reichp. 257
Abbreviationsp. 265
Notesp. 267
German Archives and Periodicals Consultedp. 325
Bibliographyp. 331
Indexp. 351
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem