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People and space in the Middle Ages, 300-1300 /
edited by Wendy Davies, Guy Halsall and Andrew Reynolds ; with illustrations by Alex Langlands.
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, 2006.
description
ix, 366 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
2503515266 (hbk.), 9782503515267 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Turnhout : Brepols, 2006.
isbn
2503515266 (hbk.)
9782503515267 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6252337
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [321]-346) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2007
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Chapters include: 'Social Identities on the Macro Scale: A Maximum View of Wansdyke', 'Geography, Communities and Socio- Political Organization in Medieval Northern Ireland', 'The Ending of the Roman City: The Case of Clunia in the Northern Plateau of Spain' and 'Villas, Territories and Communities in Merovingian Northern Gaul'.
Long Description
This book compares community definition and change in the temperate zones of southern Britain and northern France with the starkly contrasting regions of the Spanish meseta and Iceland. Local communities were fundamental to human societies in the pre-industrial world, crucial in supporting their members and regulating their relationships, as well as in wider society. While geographical and biological work on territoriality is very good, existing archaeological literature is rarely time-specific and lacks wider social context; most of its premises are too simple for the interdependencies of the early medieval world. Historical work, by contrast, has a weak sense of territory and no sense of scale; like much archaeological work, there is confusion about distinctions - and relationships - between kin groups, neighbourhood groups, collections of tenants and small polities. The contributors to this book address what determined the size and shape of communities in the early historic past and the ways that communities delineated themselves in physical terms. The roles of the environment, labour patterns, the church and the physical proximity of residences in determining community identity are also examined. Additional themes include social exclusion, the community as an elite body, and the various stimuli for change in community structure. Major issues surrounding relationships between the local and the governmental are investigated: did larger polities exploit pre-existing communities, or did developments in governance call local communities into being? The contributors to this book address what determined the size and shape of communities in Britain, France, Spain and Iceland in the early historic past, and the ways that these communities delineated themselves in physical terms. "
Long Description
This book is about the relationship between populations, territory and community membership in the Middle Ages in western Europe. The contributors believe that a strong awareness of land and landscape in the present is essential to understanding the relationships between people and territory in the past. They address such issues as: what determined the size and shape of communities in the early historic past? What were the roles of the environment, of labor patterns, of the church, of the physical proximity of residences in determining community identity?
Long Description
This book is about the relationship between populations, territory and community membership in the Middle Ages in western Europe. The contributors compare community definition, the ways that changed, and the reasons for the changes in the temperate zones of southern Britain and northern France with the starkly contrasting regions of the Spanish meseta and Iceland. The existence of local communities is fundamental to the organization of human societies in the pre-industrial world; they had a crucial role in supporting their members and regulating their relationships, as well as a role in a wider society. There is plenty of scholarly literature on the subject but it has limitations: geographical and biological work on territoriality is very good but it is rarely time-specific and lacks wider social context; most of its premises are too simple for the interdependencies of the early medieval world. Historical work, on the other hand, has a weak sense of territory and no sense of scale; like much archaeological work, it is also riddled with confusions about the distinctions - and relationships - between kin groups, neighbourhood groups, collections of tenants and small polities. The contributors to this book believe that a strong awareness of land and landscape in the present is essential to understanding the relationships between people and territory in the past. They will address such issues as: what determined the size and shape of communities in the early historic past? Did communities leave markers on the ground, to be picked up and traced centuries later? What were the roles of the environment, of labour patterns, of the church, of the physical proximity of residences, for example, in determining community identity? What about social exclusion within discrete populations - in what circumstances was the community an elite body, and what stimulated change in community structure? There are also major issues surrounding the relationships between the local and the governmental: did the larger polity depend on building blocks of pre-existing communities? Or did the needs of the government in effect call local communities into being?
Main Description
This book compares community definition and change in the temperature zones of southern Britain and northern France with the starkly contrasting regions of the Spanish meseta and Iceland. Local communities were fundamental to human societies in the pre-industrial world; crucial in supporting their members and regulating their relationships, as well as in wider society. While geographical and biological work on territoriality is very good, existing archaelogical literature is rarely time-specific and lacks wider social context; most of its premises are too simple for the interdependencies of the early medieval world. Historical work, by contrast, has a weak sense of territory and no sense of scale; like much archaelogical work, there is confusion about distinctions - and relationships - between kin groups, neighbourhood groups, collections of tenants and small polities.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Photosp. x
List of Platesp. xi
List of Tablesp. xii
Note on Glossary Entriesp. xiii
Acknowledgementsp. xiv
List of Abbreviationsp. xv
Introduction: Community Definition and Community Formation in the Early Middle Ages - Some Questionsp. 1
Social Identities on the Macro Scale: A Maximum View of Wansdykep. 13
Settlement Organization and Farm Abandonment: The Curious Landscape of Reykjahvetfi, North-East Icelandp. 45
Geography, Communities and Socio-Political Organization in Medieval Northern Icelandp. 65
Communities of Dispersed Settlements: Social Organization at the Ground Level in Tenth- to Thirteenth-Century Icelandp. 87
Boundaries of Knowledge: Mapping the Land Units of Late Anglo-Saxon and Norman Englandp. 115
Mapping Scale Change: Hierarchization and Fission in Castilian Rural Communities during the Tenth and Eleventh Centuriesp. 143
Central Places and the Territorial Organization of Communities: The Occupation of Hilltop Sites in Early Medieval Northern Castilep. 167
The Ending of the Roman City: The Case of Clunia in the Northern Plateau of Spainp. 187
Villas, Territories and Communities in Merovingian Northern Gaulp. 209
Community, Identity and the Later Anglo-Saxon Town: The Case of Southern Englandp. 233
Marmoutier: Familia versus Family. The Relations between Monastery and Serfs in Eleventh-Century North-West Francep. 255
Narrating Places: Memory and Space in Medieval Monasteriesp. 275
Populations, Territory and Community Membership: Contrasts and Conclusionsp. 295
Glossaryp. 309
Bibliographyp. 321
Indexp. 347
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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