Catalogue


The archaeology of race and racialization in historic America /
Charles E. Orser, Jr. ; foreword by Michael S. Nassaney.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.
description
xiii, 213 p.
ISBN
9780813031439 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.
isbn
9780813031439 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6251272
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Charles E. Orser, Jr., is distinguished professor of anthropology at Illinois State University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-07-01:
Orser (Illinois State Univ.) has spent the last quarter century conducting historical archaeological research on the social category of race. He has a political agenda, in that he believes that most archaeological work on race sidesteps the sociopolitical aspects of the question by limiting investigations to ethnicity. However, studies of ethnicity do not account for the harmful social effects of racial ideology, which modern world archaeology must address to have relevance today. Having written extensively on African American historical archaeology, Orser examines the "racialization" of Irish and Chinese immigrants to show the broader analytical utility of racialization as a research tool. He suggests employing a methodology of concepts that he defines as "epochal structures, network relations, socio-spatial dialectic, habitus, capital and fields." Historical archaeology has particularly relevant methods for investigating material culture and spatiality, including the practical and symbolic functions of social space, enriching other approaches. Orser is a recognized leader in the field, making the volume a must for historical archaeologists and other social scientists involved in the historical aspects of ethnicity and class. This is his clearest, most concise statement of methodology to date. Four dozen figures and tables, a strong bibliography, and a solid index. Summing Up: Essential. All academic levels/libraries. D. L. Browman Washington University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Orser's analysis of race and racialization as ongoing historical processes liberates us from the commonly accepted idea that race is a fixed social reality. In examining the material lives of the Irish in New York and the Chinese in California, Orser demonstrates the vast impact that the process of racialization has had on immigrant communities in the United States. A must read for any historical archaeologist seriously interested in understanding the meanings of race and ethnicity."
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
"Orser's analysis of race and racialization as ongoing historical processes liberates us from the commonly accepted idea that race is a fixed social reality. In examining the material lives of the Irish in New York and the Chinese in California, Orser demonstrates the vast impact that the process of racialization has had on immigrant communities in the United States. A must read for any historical archaeologist seriously interested in understanding the meanings of race and ethnicity."--James A. Delle, Kutztown University With the advent of this book, the ability of archaeologists to contribute to the study of race no longer can be doubted. By focusing on "racialization," the marginalizing process in which racial categories are imposed on groups of people based on some outward characteristic, Charles Orser shows how historical archaeology can contribute to the study of race through the conscious examination of material culture. He demonstrates this in two case studies, one from the Five Points excavation in New York City focusing on an immigrant Irish population, the second from a Chinese laundry in Stockton, California. Orser argues that race has not always been defined by skin color; through time, its meaning has changed. The process of racialization has marked most groups who came to the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; this book demonstrates ways that historical archaeology can contribute to understanding a fundamental element of the American immigrant experience.
Description for Bookstore
"Orser's analysis of race and racialization as ongoing historical processes liberates us from the commonly accepted idea that race is a fixed social reality. In examining the material lives of the Irish in New York and the Chinese in California, Orser demonstrates the vast impact that the process of racialization has had on immigrant communities in the United States. A must read for any historical archaeologist seriously interested in understanding the meanings of race and ethnicity."--James A. Delle, Kutztown University With the advent of this book, the ability of archaeologists to contribute to the study of race no longer can be doubted. By focusing on "racialization," the marginalizing process in which racial categories are imposed on groups of people based on some outward characteristic, Charles Orser shows how historical archaeology can contribute to the study of race through the conscious examination of material culture. He demonstrates this in two case studies, one from the Five Points excavation in New York City focusing on an immigrant Irish population, the second from a Chinese laundry in Stockton, California. Orser argues that race has not always been defined by skin col∨ through time, its meaning has changed. The process of racialization has marked most groups who came to the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; this book demonstrates ways that historical archaeology can contribute to understanding a fundamental element of the American immigrant experience.
Title Summary
"By focusing on "racialization" - the marginalizing process in which racial categories are imposed on groups of people based on an outward characteristic - Charles Orser shows how historical archaeology can contribute to the study of race through the conscious examination of material culture. He demonstrates this in two case studies, one from the Five Points excavation in New York City, focusing on an immigrant Irish population, and the second from a Chinese laundry in Stockton, California." "Orser argues that race has not always been defined by skin color; through time its meaning has changed. The process of racialization has marked most groups who came to the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and The Archaeology of Race and Racialization in Historic America demonstrates ways that historical archaeology can contribute to understanding a fundamental element of the American immigrant experience."--BOOK JACKET.
Main Description
With the advent of this book, the ability of archaeologists to contribute to the study of race no longer can be doubted. By focusing on "racialization," the marginalizing process in which racial categories are imposed on groups of people based on some outward characteristic, Charles Orser shows how historical archaeology can contribute to the study of race through the conscious examination of material culture. He demonstrates this in two case studies, one from the Five Points excavation in New York City focusing on an immigrant Irish population, the second from a Chinese laundry in Stockton, California. Orser argues that race has not always been defined by skin col∨ through time, its meaning has changed. The process of racialization has marked most groups who came to the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; this book demonstrates ways that historical archaeology can contribute to understanding a fundamental element of the American immigrant experience.
Long Description
With the advent of this book, the ability of archaeologists to contribute to the study of race no longer can be doubted. By focusing on "racialization," the marginalizing process in which racial categories are imposed on groups of people based on some outward characteristic, Charles Orser shows how historical archaeology can contribute to the study of race through the conscious examination of material culture. He demonstrates this in two case studies, one from the Five Points excavation in New York City focusing on an immigrant Irish population, the second from a Chinese laundry in Stockton, California. Orser argues that race has not always been defined by skin color; through time, its meaning has changed. The process of racialization has marked most groups who came to the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; this book demonstrates ways that historical archaeology can contribute to understanding a fundamental element of the American immigrant experience.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
List of Figuresp. ix
Forewordp. xi
Prefacep. xv
Race, Racialization, and Why Archaeologists Should Carep. 1
Race in American Archaeologyp. 3
Historical Archaeology and Diversityp. 7
Racializationp. 9
Racialization and American Historical Archaeologistsp. 15
The Early Yearsp. 16
The Middle Yearsp. 20
The Recent Yearsp. 28
Racialization in Summaryp. 34
Race, Class, and the Archaeology of the Modern Worldp. 41
A Question of Scalep. 41
A Question of Classp. 44
Epochal Structuresp. 52
Network Relationsp. 54
The Socio-Spatial Dialecticp. 57
Habitusp. 57
Capitalp. 59
Fieldsp. 61
Modern-World Archaeology and Racializationp. 64
Seeing Race in Thingsp. 66
Racing the Pastp. 70
The Irish in New York Cityp. 72
Background of Excavationp. 73
The Irish at the 472 Pearl Street Tenementp. 75
Homegrown Habitusp. 79
Epochal Structures in Irish Americap. 88
Learned Habitus of Race in Irish Americap. 109
Segregating the Irish, New York Stylep. 111
The Material Possessions of the Racialized Irish in a New York Tenementp. 112
The Chinese in Northern Californiap. 125
Background of Excavationp. 125
The Chinese at 117-123 Channel Streetp. 127
The Chinese in Northern Californiap. 130
The Chinese at Homep. 133
Epochal Structures of Chinese Racialization in Americap. 139
Learned Habitus of Race in Chinese Americap. 158
The Chinese Laundry in Northern Californiap. 159
The Materiality of Chinese Racialization in Stocktonp. 164
Race and the Chinese Laundry Workers in Stocktonp. 175
Modern-World Archaeology and Racializationp. 179
The Role of Structurep. 181
The Fixity of Identityp. 182
Bibliographyp. 187
Indexp. 205
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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