Catalogue


Citizens more than soldiers : the Kentucky militia and society in the early republic /
Harry S. Laver.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007.
description
ix, 216 p.
ISBN
0803229704 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780803229709 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007.
isbn
0803229704 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780803229709 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6247288
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 199-210) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-11-01:
Laver's brief but solid volume seeks to undo the stereotypes of Kentucky's early republic militia as a disorganized horde of drunken and militarily ill-prepared ruffians. In contrast, he posits that the state's citizen-soldiery thrived as a robust and viral social, political, and economic organization that served as an integral institution that contributed greatly to the state's civic maturation. Utilizing a vast array of primary sources, Laver (Southeastern Louisiana Univ.) explores the role of the militiaman in developing Kentucky society: promoting democratic political participation, espousing masculine values, and nurturing community involvement. Moreover, the order and stability provided by the militia as a constabulary force allowed both the economy and population to blossom in the early 19th century. The author's analysis successfully examines the militia's role in the broader US civil-military tradition by cogently cultivating its key themes (heritage, political activism, gender roles, social standing). However, the rare identification of any of the militia's institutional failures receives little development. Regardless, this exceptional look into the non-military contributions of the post-Revolution militia to US society is useful to any historian of the early republic or civil-military relations. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. B. A. Wineman Marine Corps University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Scholars and students of the American militia system will find this well organized and well written book to be an insightful and valuable addition to their professional libraries. Mr. Laver accomplishes his goal of interpreting the militia's impact on the early republic's growth. The arguments put forth widen the scope of existing studies and provide depth for the exploration of militia influences on local communities, politics, and masculinity today. Citizens More Than Soldiers is an excellent social history of a military subject." Journal of Military History
"Scholars and students of the American militia system will find this well organized and well written book to be an insightful and valuable addition to their professional libraries. Mr. Laver accomplishes his goal of interpreting the militia's impact on the early republic's growth. The arguments put forth widen the scope of existing studies and provide depth for the exploration of militia influences on local communities, politics, and masculinity today.Citizens More Than Soldiersis an excellent social history of a military subject."Journal of Military History
"This exceptional look into the non-military contributions of the post-Revolution militia to U.S. society is useful to any historian of the early republic or civil-military relations." B. A. Wineman, Choice
"This exceptional look into the non-military contributions of the post-Revolution militia to U.S. society is useful to any historian of the early republic or civil-military relations."-B. A. Wineman, Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Citizens More than Soldiers' demonstrates that the militia remained an active civil institution in the early 19th century, affecting the era's great social, political and economic transitions.
Long Description
Historians typically depict nineteenth-century militiamen as drunken buffoons who stumbled into crooked lines, poked each other with cornstalk weapons, and inevitably shot their commander in the backside with a rusty, antiquated musket. "Citizens More than Soldiers" demonstrates that, to the contrary, the militia remained an active civil institution in the early nineteenth century, affecting the era's great social, political, and economic transitions. In fact, given their degree of community involvement, militiamen were more influential in Kentucky's maturation than any other formal community organization. "Citizens More than Soldiers" reveals that the militia was not the atrophied remnant of the Revolution's minutemen but an ongoing organization that maintained an important presence in American society. This study also shows that citizen-soldiers participated in their communities by establishing local, regional, and national identities, reinforcing the social hierarchy, advancing democratization and party politics, keeping the public peace, encouraging economic activity, and defining concepts of masculinity. A more accurate understanding of the militia's contribution to American society extends our comprehension of the evolutionary processes of a maturing nation, showing, for example, how citizen-soldiers promoted nationalism, encouraged democratization, and maintained civil order. "Citizens More than Soldiers" is not a traditional military history of campaigns and battles but rather the story of citizen-soldiers and their contribution to the transformation of American society in the nineteenth century.
Main Description
Historians typically depict nineteenth-century militiamen as drunken buffoons who stumbled into crooked lines, poked each other with cornstalk weapons, and inevitably shot their commander in the backside with a rusty, antiquated musket.Citizens More than Soldiersdemonstrates that, to the contrary, the militia remained an active civil institution in the early nineteenth century, affecting the era's great social, political, and economic transitions. In fact, given their degree of community involvement, militiamen were more influential in Kentucky's maturation than any other formal community organization. Citizens More than Soldiersreveals that the militia was not the atrophied remnant of the Revolution's minutemen but an ongoing organization that maintained an important presence in American society. This study also shows that citizen-soldiers participated in their communities by establishing local, regional, and national identities, reinforcing the social hierarchy, advancing democratization and party politics, keeping the public peace, encouraging economic activity, and defining concepts of masculinity. A more accurate understanding of the militia's contribution to American society extends our comprehension of the evolutionary processes of a maturing nation, showing, for example, how citizen-soldiers promoted nationalism, encouraged democratization, and maintained civil order.Citizens More than Soldiersis not a traditional military history of campaigns and battles but rather the story of citizen-soldiers and their contribution to the transformation of American society in the nineteenth century.
Main Description
Historians typically depict nineteenth-century militiamen as drunken buffoons who stumbled into crooked lines, poked each other with cornstalk weapons, and inevitably shot their commander in the backside with a rusty, antiquated musket.Citizens More than Soldiersdemonstrates that, to the contrary, the militia remained an active civil institution in the early nineteenth century, affecting the era's great social, political, and economic transitions. In fact, given their degree of community involvement, militiamen were more influential in Kentucky's maturation than any other formal community organization.Citizens More than Soldiersreveals that the militia was not the atrophied remnant of the Revolution's minutemen but an ongoing organization that maintained an important presence in American society. This study also shows that citizen-soldiers participated in their communities by establishing local, regional, and national identities, reinforcing the social hierarchy, advancing democratization and party politics, keeping the public peace, encouraging economic activity, and defining concepts of masculinity. A more accurate understanding of the militia's contribution to American society extends our comprehension of the evolutionary processes of a maturing nation, showing, for example, how citizen-soldiers promoted nationalism, encouraged democratization, and maintained civil order.Citizens More than Soldiersis not a traditional military history of campaigns and battles but rather the story of citizen-soldiers and their contribution to the transformation of American society in the nineteenth century.
Main Description
Historians typically depict nineteenth-century militiamen as drunken buffoons who stumbled into crooked lines, poked each other with cornstalk weapons, and inevitably shot their commander in the backside with a rusty, antiquated musket. Citizens More than Soldiers demonstrates that, to the contrary, the militia remained an active civil institution in the early nineteenth century, affecting the era's great social, political, and economic transitions. In fact, given their degree of community involvement, militiamen were more influential in Kentucky's maturation than any other formal community organization. Citizens More than Soldiers reveals that the militia was not the atrophied remnant of the Revolution's minutemen but an ongoing organization that maintained an important presence in American society. This study also shows that citizen-soldiers participated in their communities by establishing local, regional, and national identities, reinforcing the social hierarchy, advancing democratization and party politics, keeping the public peace, encouraging economic activity, and defining concepts of masculinity. A more accurate understanding of the militia's contribution to American society extends our comprehension of the evolutionary processes of a maturing nation, showing, for example, how citizen-soldiers promoted nationalism, encouraged democratization, and maintained civil order. Citizens More than Soldiers is not a traditional military history of campaigns and battles but rather the story of citizen-soldiers and their contribution to the transformation of American society in the nineteenth century.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Rethinking the Social Role of the Militiap. 1
The Hunters of Kentuckyp. 9
Public Gatherings and Social Orderp. 20
Stability and Security in a Time of Transitionp. 48
Proponents of Democracy and Partisanshipp. 66
A Refuge of Manhoodp. 98
Fighters, Protectors, and Menp. 128
Conclusion: Citizens More than Soldiersp. 144
Appendixp. 147
Notesp. 155
Bibliographyp. 199
Indexp. 211
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem