Catalogue


Swimming up the Tigris : real life encounters with Iraq /
Barbara Nimri Aziz.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.
description
xviii, 314 p.
ISBN
0813031443 (alk. paper), 9780813031446 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.
isbn
0813031443 (alk. paper)
9780813031446 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6238927
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [307]-310) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-08-01:
Aziz, an Arab American anthropologist and journalist, began reporting on Iraq in 1989, the year that marked the end of the terrible and mutually destructive eight-year war between Iraq and Iran. She subsequently made a number of visits to assess the impact of the UN-imposed harsh economic sanctions that lasted 12 years, ending with the 2003 military invasion and occupation of the country by the US and its allies. The result is this collection of sensitive, carefully reported accounts of the hardships suffered by the Iraqis and their struggle to cope with the rapid deterioration of their country's health, education, and economic systems and subsequent degradation of their quality of life. Through her empathic personal portraits of a number of Iraqi men and women, Aziz powerfully conveys the pain, confusion, and outrage of the Iraqis as they cope with food rationing, lack of medicine, rampant corruption, breakdown of civility, and a crumbling infrastructure. This angry and compassionate book puts a human face on the Iraqi people's ordeal through years of cruel dictatorship, a harsh embargo, and a war with no end in sight. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. A. Rassam emerita, CUNY Queens College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Captures the depth of Iraqi suffering under the impact of the inhuman sanctions and wars like no other book has."
"Few could encapsulate, as Barbara Nimri Aziz has done, the spirit, laughter, courage, and tears of the people of this extraordinary, complex land, where civilization flourished before Mohammed or Christ walked the earth. Every American and British politician should read this book and sink to their knees in shame."
"This first-hand account of the effects of sanctions on the Iraqi people is rich in description and provides a much-needed human perspective on the beleaguered Iraqi people."
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2008
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Day-to-day achievements of ordinary Iraqis in extraordinary times. "Few could encapsulate, as Barbara Nimri Aziz has done, the spirit, laughter, courage, and tears of the people of this extraordinary, complex land, where civilization flourished before Mohammed or Christ walked the earth. Every American and British politician should read this book and sink to their knees in shame."--Felicity Arbuthnot, journalist, broadcaster, and senior researcher for John Pilger's award-winning documentary “Paying the Price: Killing the Children of Iraq” "This first-hand account of the effects of sanctions on the Iraqi people is rich in description and provides a much-needed human perspective on the beleaguered Iraqi people."--Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban, Rhode Island College "Captures the depth of Iraqi suffering under the impact of the inhuman sanctions and wars like no other book has."--Naseer H. Aruri, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth As Americans went about their daily lives in the 1990s, few could imagine what Iraqi men and women faced under the brutal sanctions imposed by the UN and enforced by the United States. Barbara Nimri Aziz, a frequent visitor to Iraq, saw first-hand what life was like for Iraqis during the long years of the embargo. Swimming Up the Tigrisreveals Aziz's skill as both a journalist and an anthropologist. In the book, she allows ordinary Iraqis to speak directly to us. We learn of the breakdown of Iraq's once exemplary medical system, and of needless deaths as a result of poor healthcare. We hear of deprivations, aerial bombardments, and local efforts to fight an embargo viewed by many as unjust. Drawing on intimate sources inside Iraq, the author reveals disparities between news reports of unfolding events and what Iraqi men and women were actually experiencing in the months preceding the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. By revisiting this critical period, Aziz sheds light on the illegal and questionable tactics used by the United States to destroy Iraq through the sanctions, well before the WMD ruse, and provides context to more fully understand the current failed occupation and worldwide anti-U.S. sentiments.
Description for Bookstore
Day-to-day achievements of ordinary Iraqis in extraordinary times. "Few could encapsulate, as Barbara Nimri Aziz has done, the spirit, laughter, courage, and tears of the people of this extraordinary, complex land, where civilization flourished before Mohammed or Christ walked the earth. Every American and British politician should read this book and sink to their knees in shame."--Felicity Arbuthnot, journalist, broadcaster, and senior researcher for John Pilger's award-winning documentary "Paying the Price: Killing the Children of Iraq" "This first-hand account of the effects of sanctions on the Iraqi people is rich in description and provides a much-needed human perspective on the beleaguered Iraqi people."--Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban, Rhode Island College "Captures the depth of Iraqi suffering under the impact of the inhuman sanctions and wars like no other book has."--Naseer H. Aruri, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth As Americans went about their daily lives in the 1990s, few could imagine what Iraqi men and women faced under the brutal sanctions imposed by the UN and enforced by the United States. Barbara Nimri Aziz, a frequent visitor to Iraq, saw first-hand what life was like for Iraqis during the long years of the embargo. Swimming Up the Tigrisreveals Aziz's skill as both a journalist and an anthropologist. In the book, she allows ordinary Iraqis to speak directly to us. We learn of the breakdown of Iraq's once exemplary medical system, and of needless deaths as a result of poor healthcare. We hear of deprivations, aerial bombardments, and local efforts to fight an embargo viewed by many as unjust. Drawing on intimate sources inside Iraq, the author reveals disparities between news reports of unfolding events and what Iraqi men and women were actually experiencing in the months preceding the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. By revisiting this critical period, Aziz sheds light on the illegal and questionable tactics used by the United States to destroy Iraq through the sanctions, well before the WMD ruse, and provides context to more fully understand the current failed occupation and worldwide anti-U.S. sentiments.
Long Description
As Americans went about their daily lives in the 1990s, few could imagine what Iraqi men and women faced under the brutal sanctions imposed by the UN and enforced by the United States. Barbara Nimri Aziz, a frequent visitor to Iraq, saw first-hand what life was like for Iraqis during the long years of the embargo. Swimming Up the Tigris reveals Aziz's skill as both a journalist and an anthropologist. In the book, she allows ordinary Iraqis to speak directly to us. We learn of the breakdown of Iraq's once exemplary medical system, and of needless deaths as a result of poor healthcare. We hear of deprivations, aerial bombardments, and local efforts to fight an embargo viewed by many as unjust. Drawing on intimate sources inside Iraq, the author reveals disparities between news reports of unfolding events and what Iraqi men and women were actually experiencing in the months preceding the U.S.-led invasion in 2003. By revisiting this critical period, Aziz sheds light on the illegal and questionable tactics used by the United States to destroy Iraq through the sanctions, well before the WMD ruse, and provides context to more fully understand the current failed occupation and worldwide anti-U.S. sentiments.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
List of Field Notesp. x
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Abbreviationsp. xix
Mapp. xx
Introductionp. 1
War Comingp. 27
Just Imagine: Baghdad, March 8, 2003, International Women's Dayp. 41
Adnan in America (Forget about Iraq), 2001p. 48
Mehdip. 58
"I Love My Country"p. 68
There Goes the Medical Systemp. 91
One Iraqi Child and Her Father, 1996p. 103
Books Break Sanctionsp. 110
Just Businessp. 121
Who Gets Whatp. 130
Trade or Aid?p. 141
A Little Lootp. 145
Skies over Baghdad, 2000p. 154
One Farmer's Messagep. 165
"Him!"p. 177
Sabaar and the Boys at the Officep. 191
The Pharmacyp. 201
Facing the Childrenp. 210
Empty Playgroundsp. 223
"Ah, the Border"p. 228
Gravesites: Environmental Ruin in Iraqp. 239
Targets, Not Victimsp. 250
Where Is Amaar?p. 262
"You Are My Guest"p. 271
Birds of a Featherp. 277
Notesp. 289
Select Bibliographyp. 307
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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