Catalogue


From yellow dog Democrats to red state Republicans : Florida and its politics since 1940 /
David R. Colburn.
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida ; Tampa, Fla. : published in cooperation with USF Libraries' Flordia Studies Center c2007.
description
x, 262 p.
ISBN
0813031559 (alk. paper), 9780813031552 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Gainesville : University Press of Florida ; Tampa, Fla. : published in cooperation with USF Libraries' Flordia Studies Center c2007.
isbn
0813031559 (alk. paper)
9780813031552 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6238727
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-252) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-09-01:
Colburn (Univ. of Florida) places Florida's gubernatorial politics since 1940 in the context of the state's remarkable cultural, economic, and demographic transformation. Like other southern states, Florida has journeyed since WW II from a dependably Democratic stronghold to a Republican enclave, albeit for different reasons. Colburn describes Florida as "a dynamic democracy of newcomers, immigrants, natives, seniors, rednecks, [and] evangelicals," and the influx of midwesterners, northeasterners, Cubans, and other Hispanics made Florida unlike the states of the old Confederacy. People came to improve their prospects, and even though Florida had its share of racial discord, business trumped racism, allowing leaders such as Governor LeRoy Collins (1955-61) to support reform rather than fight desegregation. Democrats Reubin Askew, Bob Graham, and Lawton Chiles, each elected to two four-year terms, and each of whom claimed Collins as a mentor, provided honest, progressive leadership for 24 years prior to the election of Republican Jeb Bush (1999-2007), who benefited from Florida's realignment as a red state and instituted popular anti-tax and limited-government reforms. Colburn treats Florida's role in the 2000 election as evidence that divisions within the state reflected a similarly conflicted national electorate. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. A. J. Dunar University of Alabama in Huntsville
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Choice, September 2008
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The rise of Florida as bellwether for the politics of the South--and the nation "In this sweeping overview of modern Florida politics, Colburn challenges the country's preconceived notions of the Sunshine State's political leanings.From Yellow Dog Democrats to Red State Republicansis the result of a lifetime of observing and analyzing a once small and rural state that has transformed itself, in less than fifty years, into a political powerhouse and national weathervane."--Reubin O'D. Askew, Governor of Florida, 1971-1979 "An insightful analysis of how the Democrats lost--and the GOP gained--the most important swing state in the nation."--Cynthia Barnett, author ofMirage: Florida and the Vanishing Water of the Eastern U.S. Likely to raise hackles among Democrats and Republicans alike, this dynamic history of modern Florida argues that the Sunshine State has become the political and demographic future of the nation. David Colburn reveals how Florida gradually abandoned the traditions of race and personality that linked it to the Democratic Party. The book focuses particularly on the population growth and chaotic gubernatorial politics that altered the state from 1940, when it was a sleepy impoverished southern outpost, to the present and the emergence of a dominant Republican Party. In the twenty-first century, Colburn says, Florida is a dynamic, highly partisan, largely conservative state at the cultural, social, and economic intersection of the Western Hemisphere. But the transition hasn't been entirely felicitous. Allegations abound that the state is a "banana republic" favoring the wealthy, a piece of paradise that embraces "immigrants, natives, seniors, rednecks, evangelicals, and yes, flim-flam artists and mobile home salesmen. All of whom came to the state looking for ways to improve their lot in life." Colburn depicts the state's colorful governors at the center of every postwar development from Cracker to Sun Belt politics, from segregation to integration, from boosterism and modernization to economic and environmental crises. As the story of one of the most influential states in the nation, the book redefines Florida politics.
Main Description
Likely to raise hackles among Democrats and Republicans alike, this dynamic history of modern Florida argues that the Sunshine State has become the political and demographic future of the nation. David Colburn reveals how Florida gradually abandoned the traditions of race and personality that linked it to the Democratic Party. The book focuses particularly on the population growth and chaotic gubernatorial politics that altered the state from 1940, when it was a sleepy impoverished southern outpost, to the present and the emergence of a dominant Republican Party. In the twenty-first century, Colburn says, Florida is a dynamic, highly partisan, largely conservative state at the cultural, social, and economic intersection of the Western Hemisphere. But the transition hasn't been entirely felicitous. Allegations abound that the state is a "banana republic" favoring the wealthy, a piece of paradise that embraces "immigrants, natives, seniors, rednecks, evangelicals, and yes, flim-flam artists and mobile home salesmen. All of whom came to the state looking for ways to improve their lot in life." Colburn depicts the state's colorful governors at the center of every postwar development from Cracker to Sun Belt politics, from segregation to integration, from boosterism and modernization to economic and environmental crises. As the story of one of the most influential states in the nation, the book redefines Florida politics.
Description for Bookstore
The rise of Florida as bellwether for the politics of the South--and the nation "In this sweeping overview of modern Florida politics, Colburn challenges the country’s preconceived notions of the Sunshine State’s political leanings. From Yellow Dog Democrats to Red State Republicansis the result of a lifetime of observing and analyzing a once small and rural state that has transformed itself, in less than fifty years, into a political powerhouse and national weathervane."--Reubin O’D. Askew, Governor of Florida, 1971-1979 "An insightful analysis of how the Democrats lost--and the GOP gained--the most important swing state in the nation."--Cynthia Barnett, author of Mirage: Florida and the Vanishing Water of the Eastern U.S. Likely to raise hackles among Democrats and Republicans alike, this dynamic history of modern Florida argues that the Sunshine State has become the political and demographic future of the nation. David Colburn reveals how Florida gradually abandoned the traditions of race and personality that linked it to the Democratic Party. The book focuses particularly on the population growth and chaotic gubernatorial politics that altered the state from 1940, when it was a sleepy impoverished southern outpost, to the present and the emergence of a dominant Republican Party. In the twenty-first century, Colburn says, Florida is a dynamic, highly partisan, largely conservative state at the cultural, social, and economic intersection of the Western Hemisphere. But the transition hasn't been entirely felicitous. Allegations abound that the state is a "banana republic" favoring the wealthy, a piece of paradise that embraces "immigrants, natives, seniors, rednecks, evangelicals, and yes, flim-flam artists and mobile home salesmen. All of whom came to the state looking for ways to improve their lot in life." Colburn depicts the state's colorful governors at the center of every postwar development from Cracker to Sun Belt politics, from segregation to integration, from boosterism and modernization to economic and environmental crises. As the story of one of the most influential states in the nation, the book redefines Florida politics.
Description for Bookstore
The rise of Florida as bellwether for the politics of the South--and the nation "In this sweeping overview of modern Florida politics, Colburn challenges the country's preconceived notions of the Sunshine State's political leanings. From Yellow Dog Democrats to Red State Republicansis the result of a lifetime of observing and analyzing a once small and rural state that has transformed itself, in less than fifty years, into a political powerhouse and national weathervane."--Reubin O'D. Askew, Governor of Florida, 1971-1979 "An insightful analysis of how the Democrats lost--and the GOP gained--the most important swing state in the nation."--Cynthia Barnett, author of Mirage: Florida and the Vanishing Water of the Eastern U.S. Likely to raise hackles among Democrats and Republicans alike, this dynamic history of modern Florida argues that the Sunshine State has become the political and demographic future of the nation. David Colburn reveals how Florida gradually abandoned the traditions of race and personality that linked it to the Democratic Party. The book focuses particularly on the population growth and chaotic gubernatorial politics that altered the state from 1940, when it was a sleepy impoverished southern outpost, to the present and the emergence of a dominant Republican Party. In the twenty-first century, Colburn says, Florida is a dynamic, highly partisan, largely conservative state at the cultural, social, and economic intersection of the Western Hemisphere. But the transition hasn't been entirely felicitous. Allegations abound that the state is a "banana republic" favoring the wealthy, a piece of paradise that embraces "immigrants, natives, seniors, rednecks, evangelicals, and yes, flim-flam artists and mobile home salesmen. All of whom came to the state looking for ways to improve their lot in life." Colburn depicts the state's colorful governors at the center of every postwar development from Cracker to Sun Belt politics, from segregation to integration, from boosterism and modernization to economic and environmental crises. As the story of one of the most influential states in the nation, the book redefines Florida politics.
Table of Contents
From darkness to sunshine : World War II, race, and the emergence of modern Floridap. 11
Racial protest and the emergence of fault lines in the Democratic hegemonyp. 41
Reubin Askew, Lawton Chiles, and the reinvention of the Democratic Partyp. 73
An era of political transitionp. 99
Migration of the middle class, the search for community, and the emerging Hispanic presencep. 115
Holding back the Republican tide, but for how long?p. 136
From blue to red : the era of Jeb Bush and Republican hegemonyp. 157
The presidential election of 2000 : what happened in Florida?p. 176
So what does the future hold for Florida?p. 199
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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