Catalogue


Plays in American periodicals, 1890-1918 /
by Susan Harris Smith.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
description
xvii, 224 p. : ill.
ISBN
1403977658 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
isbn
1403977658 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6225369
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Susan Harris Smith is Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2008-02-01:
Although many scholars consider American drama a wasteland before Eugene O'Neill's emergence in the 1920s as a preeminent American playwright, in recent years scholars have turned their attention to early US drama. For example, Odai Johnson explored the Colonial period in Absence and Memory in Colonial American Theatre (CH, Dec'06, 44-2041) and, in a collaboration with William Burling, The Colonial American Stage, 1665-1774 (2001). Smith (Univ. of Pittsburgh) has tracked down more than 125 American, English, Irish, and Anglo-Indian plays, by more than 70 playwrights, published around the turn of the 20th century in such periodicals as The Atlantic Monthly, Forum, Harper's Monthly, McClure's, Scribner's, and other popular magazines of the day. A handful of essays offer analytical discussions of the plays; an extensive list of the plays, including publication details, is also included. The latter feature alone makes this book a valuable contribution to scholarly research and required reading. Future scholars will be glad to have this study of a period of American drama that has until now been somewhat neglected, Arthur Hobson Quinn's two-volume History of American Drama (1936) notwithstanding. Smith writes well, and her coverage--comprehensive, detailed, and meticulously researched--is commendable. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals. R. B. Shuman emeritus, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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Summaries
Long Description
Between 1890 and 1918, over 125 American, English, Irish and AngloIndian plays by 70 dramatists were published in 14 American general interest periodicals aimed at the middle-class reader and consumer. Ranging from elite publications such as "The Atlantic Monthly" and "Scribner's" to more mid-level venues such as "McClure's" and "Everybody's Magazine" to progressive magazines such as "Arena" and "Forum," the plays dramatized a wide range of American concerns, including anxieties about "race suicide," immigration, "white slavery," the New Woman, class distinctions, global warfare, and the creation of a unique national identity. These plays show Americans to have been "dis/contented" citizens, conflicted by the demands of a dynamically changing nation.
Main Description
Between 1890 and 1918, over 125 American, English, Irish and AngloIndian plays by 70 dramatists were published in 14 American general interest periodicals aimed at the middle-class reader and consumer. Ranging from elite publications such asThe Atlantic MonthlyandScribner'sto more mid-level venues such asMcClure'sandEverybody's Magazineto progressive magazines such asArenaandForum, the plays dramatized a wide range of American concerns, including anxieties about "race suicide," immigration, "white slavery," the New Woman, class distinctions, global warfare, and the creation of a unique national identity. These plays show Americans to have been "dis/contented" citizens, conflicted by the demands of a dynamically changing nation.
Main Description
Between 1890 and 1918, over 125 American, English, Irish and AngloIndian plays by 70 dramatists were published in 14 American general interest periodicals aimed at the middle-class reader and consumer. Ranging from elite publications such as The Atlantic Monthly and Scribner's to more mid-level venues such as McClure's and Everybody's Magazine to progressive magazines such as Arena and Forum , the plays dramatized a wide range of American concerns, including anxieties about " race suicide," immigration, " white slavery," the New Woman, class distinctions, global warfare, and the creation of a unique national identity. These plays show Americans to have been " dis/contented" citizens, conflicted by the demands of a dynamically changing nation.
Main Description
Between 1890 and 1918, over 125 American, English, Irish and AngloIndian plays by 70 dramatists were published in 14 American general interest periodicals aimed at the middle-class reader and consumer. Ranging from elite publications such as The Atlantic Monthly and Scribner's to more mid-level venues such as McClure's and Everybody's Magazine to progressive magazines such as Arena and Forum , the plays dramatized a wide range of American concerns, including anxieties about "race suicide," immigration, "white slavery," the New Woman, class distinctions, global warfare, and the creation of a unique national identity. These plays show Americans to have been "dis/contented" citizens, conflicted by the demands of a dynamically changing nation.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This publication examines over 125 American, English, Irish and Anglo-Indian plays by 70 dramatists which were published in 14 American general interest periodicals aimed at the middle-class reader and consumer.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Varieties of Dramatic Experiencep. 1
Cultures of Social Distance and Differencep. 35
Women as American Citizensp. 77
Cultural Displacementp. 117
Dis/Contented Citizensp. 149
Plays in Periodicalsp. 191
Works Citedp. 197
Indexp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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