Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The House of Lords in the reign of Charles II /
Andrew Swatland.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
description
xv, 288 p.
ISBN
0521554586 (hc)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
isbn
0521554586 (hc)
catalogue key
622463
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-03-01:
Swatland has written a thoroughly researched and well-reasoned monograph on a previously neglected topic: the "restored House of Lords." He argues for an enlarged role for the House of Lords as an institution that helped to make policy and shape politics during the reign of Charles II. While the noble lords were more likely than the commons to support Charles II's liberal interpretation of his prerogative, the House was not a pliable instrument of the crown. Despite carefully conceived attempts to manage the House, the Lords could prove refractory when a question of justice was involved (as with the impeachment of the Earl of Clarendon) or when the "safety" of the Church of England was at stake (e.g., during the 1670s, when a pathological fear of Catholicism infected the peerage as well as the nation at large). Swatland follows Mark Knights in his view that the Popish Plot and exclusion crisis did not lead to the birth of the Whig and Tory parties, but, rather, that this conflict originated in court and country divisions that emerged earlier. Two superb appendixes list the membership of the House of Lords. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. R. Bisson Belmont University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...fills a long-standing in the literature and does so in a fashion that will make his a much-consulted work." Albion
"His study will prove essential reading for those interested in all Restoration religious persuasions." Gary S. De Krey, Church History
"Swatland has written a thoroughly researched and well-reasoned monograph on a previously neglected topic: the 'restored House of Lords"....Two superb appendixes list the membership of the House of Lords." D.R. Bisson, Choice
"Swatland's book fills a long-standing gap in the literature and does so in a fashion that will make his a much-consulted work by students of Restoration politics and seventeenth-century parliamentary history." Henry Horwitz, Albion
"The book is very sensibly orgranized. ...this book,...is a fine work of scholarship."Keith L. Sprunger, American Historical Review
"The work is best suited for undergraduate libraries"History
"This book is meticulously researched. Historians wilfind many useful references regarding individual peers, in the text and notes. This book is now the standard source and invites now a study of both houses in parliament and their relationship to the king." Frank T. Melton, Canadian Journal of History
"...this is a fine book that deserves a wide readership."Tim Harris, American Journal of Legal History
"This monograph...will supersede all previous published and unpublished work on Charles II's House of Lords, from those of A.S. Turberville to those of Maxfield Schoenfeld and Richard Davis. Swatland's book fills a long-standing gap... and does so in a fashion that will make his a much-consulted work by students of Restoration politics and seventeenth-century parliamentary history." Henry Horwitz, Albion
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Andrew Swatland examines the House of Lords' institutional and political activities during the reign of Charles II, and reveals the vital role played by the peerage in Caroline parliaments.
Description for Bookstore
This is the first comprehensive study of the House of Lords in the reign of Charles II. It examines the House's institutional and political activities, and reveals the vital role played by the peerage in Caroline parliaments, making it an important contribution to the history of Restoration politics and political culture.
Description for Library
This is the first comprehensive study of the House of Lords in the reign of Charles II. It examines the House's institutional and political activities, and reveals the vital role played by the peerage in Caroline parliaments. Andrew Swatland also describes the emergence of political parties, reinterpreting the origins of 'Toryism' and 'Whiggism'. This detailed and balanced study is both a major institutional history and an important contribution to the history of Restoration politics and political culture.
Main Description
This is a study of the House of Lords in the reign of Charles II. It examines the House's institutional and political activities, and reveals the vital role played by the peerage in Caroline parliaments. Andrew Swatland draws on an extensive range of sources to analyse the membership and procedural developments of the House of Lords, relating these to legislative, judicial and political issues in Restoration England. He sheds light on the Lords' relations with the king and the Commons, and assesses the contribution made by peers and bishops to the Restoration church settlement. He also describes the emergence of political parties, reinterpreting 'Toryism' and 'Whiggism' during the succession crisis of 1679-81. This detailed and balanced study is both a major institutional history and an important contribution to the history of Restoration politics and political culture.
Table of Contents
Introduction
From Abolition to Restoration
In the wilderness, 1649-1660
Members and the Business of the House
Membership, attendance and privileges
Legislation
Justice
King, Lords and Commons
King and Lords
Lords and Commons
Religion
Religious composition
Church settlement
Religious nonconformity
Politics
Factions, country peers and the 'Whig' party
Court and 'Tory' peers
Conclusion
Appendices
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem